The Making of Modern Social Psychology: The Hidden Story of How an International Social Science was Created

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Wiley, Oct 6, 2006 - Psychology - 296 pages
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This fascinating book makes an important contribution to the history of the social sciences. It tells the largely hidden story of how social psychology became an international social science, vividly documenting the micro–politics of a virtually forgotten committee, the Committee on Transnational Social Psychology, whose work took place against the back–drop of some of the most momentous events of the twentieth century. Overcoming intellectual, institutional and political obstacles, including the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and the military coups in Chile or Argentine, the committee struggled to bring social psychology to global recognition, not as part of a programme of intellectual imperialism, but motivated by a mixture of intellectual philanthropy and self–interest. Few authors could tell this unique story. Serge Moscovici is undoubtedly the best–placed insider to do so, together with Ivana Markova providing a lucid, erudite and carefully documented account of the work of this remarkable group. This book will be an essential resource for any scholar interested in the history of social psychology, as well as upper–level students studying the history of the social sciences.

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About the author (2006)

Serge Moscovici is Professor of Social Psychology, l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris.

Ivana Markova is Professor of Social Psychology, University of Stirling.

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