Bananas: how the United Fruit Company shaped the world

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Canongate, 2007 - Business & Economics - 224 pages
24 Reviews
In this exploration of corporate maneuvering and subterfuge, journalist Chapman shows how the importer United Fruit set the precedent for the institutionalized power and influence of today's multinational companies. This infamous company was arguably the most controversial global corporation ever--from the jungles of Costa Rica to the dramatic suicide of its CEO, who leapt from an office on the 44th floor of the Pan Am building in New York City. From the marketing of the banana as the first fast food, to the company's involvement in an invasion of Honduras, the Bay of Pigs crisis, and a bloody coup in Guatemala, Chapman weaves a tale of big business, political deceit, and outright violence to show how one company wreaked havoc in the "banana republics" of Central America, and how terrifyingly similar the age of United Fruit is to our age of rapid globalization.--From publisher description.

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Review: Bananas!: How The United Fruit Company Shaped the World

User Review  - Laurie Tomchak - Goodreads

This book was chosen for a class I am going to teach in the fall. I think it was a good choice, because for a non-fiction book it is light and kind of jokey. I only detected one slight error: the ... Read full review

Review: Bananas!: How The United Fruit Company Shaped the World

User Review  - Connie - Goodreads

this topic has been of great interest to me since gabriel introduced me to it in 100 years of solitude. this company has been unlike any other. it was called the octopus bc its long reaching arms were ... Read full review

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Contents

From the Memory of Men
1
Lament for a Dying Fruit
13
Roots of Empire
25
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Peter Chapman is a senior lecturer at the University of Tasmania in Australia and was nominated for the Tasmanian Pacific Bicentenary History Prize for his editing ofHistorical Records of Australia Series III, Volume VIII.