Hearing in Time

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OUP USA, 24 mag 2012 - 234 pagine
Our sense that a waltz is "in three" or a blues song is "in four with a shuffle" comes from our sense of musical meter. Hearing in Time explores the metric aspect of our musical experience from a psychological point of view. Musical meter is taken as a musically-specific instance entrainment, that is, our more general ability to synchronize our actions to the rhythms around us. As such, musical meter is subject to a number of fundamental perceptual and cognitive constraints. These constraints are the cornerstones of Hearing in Time's account of musical meter. Hearing in Time also takes into account the fact that listening to music, like many other rhythmic activities, is something that we do a lot. It also approaches musical meter in the context of music as it is actually performed, with nuances of timing and dynamics, rather than as a theoretical ideal. Hearing in Time's approach to meter is not based on any particular musical style or cultural practice, and so it discusses musical examples from a wide range of musical styles and cultures--from Beethoven and Bach to Brubeck and Ghanaian (Ewe) drumming. In taking this broad approach a number of fundamental similarities between a variety of different metric phenomena--such as the difference between so-called simple versus complex or additive meters--become apparent. Hearing in Time is written for musicians, musicologists, music theorists and psychologists who are interested in rhythm and meter. Only a modest ability read a musical score is presumed, and most musical examples are taken from familiar popular and classical repertory.
 

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Indice

Introduction
3
1 Meter as a Kind of Attentional Behavior
9
2 Relevant Research on Rhythmic Perception and Production
25
3 The Neurobiology and Development of Rhythm
48
Ground Rules
65
5 Metric Representations and Metric WellFormedness
77
Problems
99
7 Metric Flux in Beethovens Fifth
110
8 NonIsochronous Meters
121
9 NI Meters in Theory and Practice
143
10 The Many Meters Hypothesis
171
Conclusion
190
Notes
199
Bibliography
207
Index
227
Copyright

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Justin London is Professor of Music at Carleton College in Northfield, MN, USA. Trained as a classical guitarist, he holds the Ph.D. in Music History and Theory from the University of Pennsylvania where he studied with Leonard Meyer. His main research area is the perception and cognition of musical meter, though he is also interested in musical aesthetics, linguistic pragmatics, and the Delta Blues. He served as President of the Society for Music Theory in 2007-2009.

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