The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability

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Oxford University Press, 2016 - 200 pagine
Elizabeth Barnes argues compellingly that disability is primarily a social phenomenon--a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes even with scorn. The goal of this book is to articulate and defend a version of the view of disability that is common in the Disability Rights movement. Elizabeth Barnes argues that to be physically disabled is not to have a defective body, but simply to have a minority body.
 

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Sommario

Constructing Disability
9
BadDifference and MereDifference
54
The ValueNeutral Model
78
Taking Their Word for It
119
Causing Disability
143
Disability Pride
168
Bibliography
187
Index
199
Copyright

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Informazioni sull'autore (2016)


Elizabeth Barnes is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Virginia. She works on metaphysics, ethics, and social and feminist philosophy--and is especially interested in the places where these areas overlap.

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