Biotic Regulation of the Environment: Key Issues of Global Change

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 14, 2000 - Nature - 367 pages
It is not possible to understand the apparent stability of the Earth's climate and environment unless we can fully understand how the best possible environmental conditions may be maintained for life to exist. Human colonization of areas with natural biota, for industrial or agricultural activities, will lead to degradation of those natural communities and violation of the BRE (biotic regulation of the environment) principle.
Thus to maintain an environment on Earth that is suitable for life it is necessary to preserve and allow the natural recovery of natural biotic communities, both in the oceans and on land. This book is devoted to a quantitative version of the BRE concept, and is built on a foundation of modern scientific knowledge accumulated in the fields of physics and biology.
 

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Contents

General overview
1
12 ADAPTATION TO OR REGULATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT?
3
13 MAJOR INCONSISTENCIES IN THE GENETIC ADAPTATION PARADIGM
5
15 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FORMED BY THE NATURAL BIOTA
8
16 BIOTIC REGULATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT
9
17 CONCEPTS OF GENETIC ADAPTATION AND BIOTIC REGULATION ARE MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE
11
18 EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FOR THE BIOTIC REGULATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT
13
19 STABILITY OF LIFE ORGANISATION
15
63 GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE CHANGE
154
64 HISTORICAL DYNAMICS OF THE GLOBAL CHANGE
162
65 STOPPING THE GLOBAL CARBON CHANGE
168
66 THE WATER CYCLE
171
RECOVERY OF FOREST COMMUNITIES AFTER PERTURBATIONS
177
ANALYSIS OF EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE
182
682 Recovery Dynamics
188
Natural Periodicity
193

110 MECHANISM OF BIOTIC REGULATION
17
111 NATURAL DISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION OVER INDIVIDUALS OF DIFFERENT BODY SIZE
19
112 CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY OR BIOTIC REGULATION?
23
113 BIOTIC REGULATION CANNOT BE REPLACED BY TECHNOLOGY
24
115 DEMOGRAPHY
28
What is Life?
33
22 PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL STABILITY
35
23 SEXUAL DIMORPHISM
39
24 COMPETITIVENESS AND ORGANISATION OF LIFE
41
25 ALTRUISTIC INTERACTION OF INDIVIDUALS
43
26 NOTORIOUS GROUP SELECTION
47
27 THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF BIOLOGY
49
28 IMPOSSIBILITY OF GLOBALLYCORRELATED LIVING OBJECTS
50
29 NORM AND DEFECT
51
210 THE QUANTUM NATURE OF LIFE
53
211 THE ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY AS THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF BIOLOGICAL ORGANISATION
57
Ecology of Organisms with Different Body Sizes
60
32 BODY SIZE LIMITS
63
33 ENERGETICS AND BODY SIZE OF PHOTOSYNTHESISING PLANTS
67
34 SENSITIVITY OF THE BIOTA
70
35 FLUCTUATIONS OF SYNTHESIS AND DESTRUCTION OF ORGANIC MATTER
71
36 IMMOBILE AND LOCOMOTIVE ORGANISMS
74
37 DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMPTION BY HETEROTROPHS WITH RESPECT TO THEIR BODY SIZE
78
38 DISTRIBUTION OF BIOMASS OF HETEROTROPHS WITH RESPECT TO THEIR BODY SIZE
82
Ecology of Locomotive Animals
86
42 THE MAXIMUM SPEED OF MOVEMENT FOR ANIMALS
88
43 MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE SHARE OF BIOMASS CONSUMPTION BY LOCOMOTIVE ANIMALS
93
44 SETTLED AND NOMADIC LIFESTYLE OF LOCOMOTIVE ANIMALS
94
45 CARNIVORES
97
46 DIFFUSION OF EXCRETA
100
47 CONCLUSIONS
102
Ecological Principles of Biotic Regulation
109
52 BIOTIC AND INORGANIC FLUXES OF MATTER IN THE BIOSPHERE
110
53 EVOLUTIONARY PROGRESS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION
111
54 MATTER CYCLES IN THE BIOSPHERE
116
55 ENVIRONMENTAL HOMEOSTASIS AND INTERPRETATION OF THE BIOTIC LE CHATELIER PRINCIPLE
119
56 BIOTIC REGULATION OF MATTER CYCLES
125
RENEWABLE AND NONRENEWABLE
133
58 IMMIGRATION IN THE ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY
138
Biotic Regulation in Action
145
62 CHANGING PRODUCTION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN THE OCEAN
153
684 The Climate Issue
198
685 Current State of Forest Communities
199
Energy and Information
201
72 SOLAR ENERGY
203
73 STORES AND FLUXES OF INFORMATION IN NATURAL BIOTA AND CIVILISATION
205
74 ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION OF LARGE ANIMALS
215
Unique Nature of Climate Stability on Earth
217
82 SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THERMAL RADIATION
222
83 TRADITIONAL ESTIMATES OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DIFFERENT GREENHOUSE GASES TO THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT
224
84 DEPENDENCE OF THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT ON CONCENTRATIONS OF THE GREENHOUSE GASES
226
85 POSSIBLE CLIMATES ON EARTH AND THEIR STABILITY
231
86 PHYSICAL STABILITY OF THE EARTHS CLIMATE
233
87 BIOTIC STABILITY OF THE MODERN CLIMATE OF EARTH
236
Genetic Bases of Biotic Regulation and Life Stability Theoretical Consideration
242
92 POPULATION IN THE ABSENCE OF STABILISING SELECTION
245
93 STABILISATION OF GENETIC INFORMATION OF SPECIES
250
94 SENSITIVITY OF COMPETITIVE INTERACTION
254
95 NORMAL GENOTYPES AND THE NORMAL GENOME
255
96 NORMAL DECAY AND ADAPTIVE POLYMORPHISM IN A POPULATION
262
97 STABILITY OF BIOLOGICAL SPECIES UNDER NATURAL CONDITIONS
265
98 STABILITY OF BIOLOGICAL SPECIES UNDER UNNATURAL CONDITIONS
268
DEFINITION
274
Genetic Bases of Biotic Regulation and Life Stability Analysis of Empirical Evidence
278
102 SEXUAL DIMORPHISM AND REGULATION OF BIRTH RATE OF DECAY INDIVIDUALS
281
103 HAPLOIDY AND DIPLOIDY
284
AUTOSOMAL HETEROZYGOSITY AND SEX HEMIZYGOSITY
287
105 THRESHOLD HETEROZYGOSITY VALUES AND HALDANES RULE
290
106 ESTIMATES OF LETHAL AND HYBRID HETEROZYGOSITIES
293
107 BRIEF ACCOUNT OF DIFFERENT VIEWS ON THE NATURE OF INTRASPECIFIC VARIABILITY
295
108 POISSON DISTRIBUTION OF THE NUMBER OF POLYMORPHIC LOCI
299
109 NATURAL LEVEL OF HETEROZYGOSITY IN MAMMALS
306
1010 HETEROZYGOSITY DEPENDENCE OF BODY MASS AND GENOME SIZE
307
Evolution
315
112 ORIGIN OF NEW SPECIES
316
113 EVOLUTION OF PROKARYOTES AND EUKARYOTES
320
114 UNIFORMITY OF EVOLUTIONARY TEMPO IN DIFFERENT BIOLOGICAL TAXA
326
115 CONCLUSIONS
328
Conclusions Can the Biosphere Be Treated as a Resource?
329
References
340
Index
365
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