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deities are still the patrons of rites the most barbarous and obscene. Her annual sacrifice is the blood of thousands crushed beneath the car of Juggernaut, consumed on the funeral pile, or devoured by the monsters of the deep. Such, sir, is the moral history of millions of beings, who were created originally after the image of God, and destined for the most exalted enjoyment in his presence. Beings whom we must soon meet before the bar of God! Wherever you turn, what page soever of man's history you contemplate, from the attenuated refinements of Greece, or the golden days of Rome, to the monstrous barbarism of the Tartar, the Hottentot or the Hindoo; you meet with nothing that sweetens the enjoyments of domestic life, no precept that strengthens the bonds of more extended social intercourse; nothing that exalts, enlightens and refines the institutions of civil life; nothing that cau reclaim the abandoned, that can sustain the suffering, or whisper consolation to the dying.

We must pass over the animating description of the rise and progress of Bible institutions in Great Britain and America, and the allusion to the labours of Carey, Ward, Judson, Patterson and Morrison ; but, with the Rev. Gentleman, we would urge upon the attention of our countrymen and the world, the ancient adage“Nothing is DONE While any thing REMAINS TO BE DONE."

It is true, sir, (said Mr. S.) that since the formation of the first Bible Society, upwards of four millions of Bibles have been circulated; but we may say of these, what was said with reference to the five barley-loaves and two small fishes-what are they among so many ?

-Suppose a Bible to afford religious instructions to six persons, then twenty four millions of the human family have participated in your bounty ; but these Bibles have been distributed principally in countries where the light of salvation has sbined since the reformation. But even in those countries--in our own happy America and in this city, famous for its prompt, enlightened, and efficient zeal in the cause of Jesus, it must not be concealed, that thousands continue destitute of the Bible. What have we done to redecm the four hundred mil. Jions who sit in gross darkness and the shadow of death, ignorant of the precious Saviour driven forward by errors, the most destructive, victims of a sanguinary superstition, which every hour swells the catalogue of the dying and the damned. Have we laboured, have we prayed for those souls with an ardour becoming the disciples of Christ? Should the heathen now perishing for lack of vision, challenge us in eternity and say, these devouring flames which consume us, these ponderous chains with which we are loaded down, this dark and horrible abyss, we might have avoided through a more noble zeal of American Christians we could not plead guiltless.

When the famishing sons of Egypt cried to Pharaoh for bread, he said, Go to Joseph. Whither shall we direct the millions who are hungering after the bread of life, but to the store house of our spiritual Joseph ? Yes, sir, we will send them to the Bible Society, for there is bread enough, and to spare. And thus, when your charities. like Eden's liquid plain, pure as the expanse of heaven, shall have

Obituary.-Rer. Jonas Coe, D. D.

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spread from the rock on which the weather-beaten pilgrims landed, to the farthest promontory on our western shores, and from the Arctic Circle to Cape Horn, as you gaze with delight on a scene almost too splendid for the human eye, and see, as the result of your labours, the glory of the Redeemer irradiating the moral bemisphere of this new world, we will say to you what the poet said to Eve, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself.

Notices and acknowledgments.

" VERMONT" is under consideration. “A LANDSMAN” will perceive that liis communication came too late ; the last part, however, will be noticed in a future number. " Relation of Mrs. S- A-" is received.

Book for Children. The Memoir of Harriet Newell Truair, in our last muinber, has been published in a neat 18mo. form, and is for sale at this ofiice, and the Sunday School Depository, 59 Fulton-street.

The life of the Rev. Thomas Scoll, author of a Commentary on the Bible, will be published in a few days, by J. P. Haven of this city, in a 12mo, volume of about 450 pages, with a likeness of Mr. Scott, at the low price of $1 20. It is with pleasure we notice the publication of the Life and Letters" of this distinguished divine, in this country. We have perused a part of the volume, and fecl assured it will be found highly interesting to others, as it hias been to ourselves.

Health of the City. - Various and contradictory reports have goue abroad with respect to the existence of Yellow Ferer in our city, and we presume our country friends will be obliged by our informing them that several cases of Bilious Ferer have been reported by the Board of Health, but no cases of yellow fever. It is the opinion, however, of many respectable Physiciavs, that a number of cases of yellow fever have occurred in Rector-strect. The disease, whatever it should be called, is confined to a small district, and the city at large enjoys usual health.

INSTALLATION.-The Rev. THOMAS Mc AULEY, D.D. LL.D. late Professor in Union College, was installed by the Rev. Presbytery of New York, Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, in Rutgers'-street, in this city, on the 1st inst. The Rev. William Gray preached the sermon, the Rev. Dr. Romeyn delivered the charge to the Pastor, and the Rev. W. Stafford, the charge to the people. There was a large and respectable audience, and the exercises were solemn and interesting.,

Obituary.

Departed this life, at Troy, N. Y. on Sunday July 14th, the Rev. Jonas Coe, D. D. pastor of the Presbyterian church in that city. It has seldom fallen to our lot to record the death of a man so much beloved, and so extensively useful. He has been a faithful and laborious servant in the vineyard of his Lord and Master. He has been a practical, an every day preacher of the gospel. In the sacred desk, he has faithfully exhibited the humbling and purifying doctrines oi' the cross; in his daily walk and conversation he has given a constan! and living reproof to the profane, to the worldly minded Christian and the cold professor. In his life, he exemplified the Christian duties; in his death, the Christian graces. His private character was truly

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deities are still the patrons of rites the most barbarous an Her annual sacrifice is the blood of thousands crushed bene of Juggernaut, consumed on the funeral pile, or devoured by sters of the deep. Such, sir, is the moral history of millions who were created originally after the image of God, and d. the most exalted enjoyment in his presence. Beings whon soon meet before the bar of God! Wherever you turn, soever of man's history you contemplate, from the attenui ments of Greece, or the golden days of Rome, to the barbarism of the Tartar, the Hottentot or the Hindoo; you nothing that sweetens the enjoyments of domestic life, no pi strengthens the bonds of more extended social intercourse that exalts, enlightens and refines the institutions of civil life that cau reclaim the abandoned, that can sustain the su whisper consolation to the dying.

We must pass over the animating description of the rise and Bible institutions in Great Britain and America, and the allusion to of Carey, Ward, Judson, Patterson and Morrison ; but, with the F man, we would urge upon the attention of our countrymen and the ancient adage“Nothing is DONE WHILE any thing REMAINS TO BE DONE.”

It is true, sir, (said Mr. S.) that since the formation o Bible Society, upwards of four millions of Bibles have been c but we may say of these, what was said with reference to barley-loaves and two small fishes—what are they among

-Suppose a Bible to afford religious instruction' to six pers twenty four millions of the human family have participate bounty ; but these Bibles have been distributed principally tries where the light of salvation has shined since the ref But even in those countries in our own happy Americacity, famous for its prompt, enlightened, and efficient zeal in of Jesus, it must not be concealed, that thousands continue of the Bible. What have we done to redeem the four hur lions who sit in gross darkness and the shadow of death, ig tüe precious Saviour driven forward by errors, the most de victims of a sanguinary superstition, which every hours catalogue of the dying and the damned. Have we labou we prayed for those souls with an ardour becoming the di Christ? Should the heathen now perisbing for lack of vis lenge us in eternity and say, these devouring flames which us, these ponderous chains with which we are loaded d dark and horrible abyss, we might have avoided through a m zeal of American Christians we could not plead guiltless.

When the famishing sons of Egypt cried to Pharaoh for said, Go to Joseph. Whither shall we direct the millions hungering after the bread of life, but to the store house of tual Joseph ? Yes, sir, we will send them to the Bible So there is bread enough, and to spare. And thus, when your like Eden's liquid plain, pare as the expanse of heaven, s

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amiable. He was an affectionate husband, and the tenderest of parents. In his intercourse with society, he was truly polite, for his ac. tions were regulated by the essence of politeness--true benevolence :

CIVIL RETROSPECT.

FOREIGN. Russia and Turkey.—The news from Europe since our last article: has been of a more pacific aspect than heretofore. Not only is the additional delay, at this season, in the commencement of hostilities favourable to the belief that war will not take place, but there are reports that the Turkish armies are withdrawing from their positions on the Russian frontier, and the evacuation by the Turkish forces, of Wallacbia and Moldavia, is confidently spoken of. We do not, however, lessen our confidence in the importance of the transactions which have taken place in the south-eastern quarter of Europe. We cannot doubt, that if peace be preserved, it will be by the accession of Turkey to terms which shall guarantee some measure of security to the Greeks, and authorize some of the high powers of Europe to assume, more intimately than heretofore, the character of protectors of the Greeks, and of Christians in general. Nor will it be a small consideration, that Europe has been taught, that Turkey, who has so often in former days trampled upon the laws and the rights of nations, and made her sword alone her rule of conduct, is herself the subject of intimidation; and that the mere demonstration of the force of her powerful neighbours is enough to bring her to the terms of civilized negotiation, and to drive her to court the favourable offices even of Christian powers. In short, we deem the events wbich have taken place, a proof that the Mahommedan pow. er is now inferior to that of Christendom, and that it must listen to the voice which the latter shall raise in favour of justice and civilized humanity.

Spain.--Spain still continues unsettled, having neither force enough in its government, nor virtue enough in its people, nor a sufficient preponderance of any factions, to give any stability to its institutions or security to the people at large. Every new account from that country informs us of new tumults and disorders. In addition to the remarks which, in a former number, we made on the situation of Spain, it deserves to be noted, that destitute as Spain is of the habits and principles which render a people orderly, and a government strong and stable, she also lies under the positive disadvantage of having bad all her institutions disturbed during the French invasion, her population accustomed to scenes of tumult and bloodshed, which took away from such scenes that terror which elsewhere unites a country to suppress them, and no small part of it engaged in a partisan warfare against the French, which fitted them more for the business of robbers than the duties of quiet citizens.

We observe that the news has been received there of the acknow.

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