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pleated skirt reaching to the knees, a full blouse something on the sailor order, with wide collar and revers, and short sleeves in one big puff, finished with an elastic band so that they can be pushed up almost to the shoulder, leaving the arms free. Either full knickerbockers or bathing tights are worn, but the skirt is so well cut and so full that it is not necessary to have the trousers of the same material, as was formerly the case when the skirt was made on simpler and scanter lines. Black, bright blue, and red are the three favorite colors; and the smartest suits are not trimmed with braid. The revers are of silk, and are either of the same color as the gown or of white. All of these bathing suits are becoming and are most carefully cut and fitted. As a rule, bathing corsets are worn with them—very thin affairs, with only a few bones, and never tight. A wide belt of leather or of silk (if of the latter, with sash ends knotted at the side) finishes the skirt and waist. Tennis gowns are much more elaborate than they were a few years ago, and are more elaborate than the golf costumes, although the golf fashions also are decidedly more feminine than they were. There is more fulness to the skirt, although the circular skirt is decidedly the most comfortable to wear. Serge, cloth, Scotch tweed, and linen are all used for the golf skirts and also for the tennis skirts, but the tennis gowns are quite as elaborate as the ordinary short gown intended for summer mornings. The golf shirts are more businesslike in appearance and much more severe and plain than those worn for tennis. Indeed, the lace and embroidered linen blouses for tennis are quite fanciful and very attractive. The embroidered hats give a very picturesque effect, also, whereas the golf hats are all on the severe order. Automobile costumes are most singular in appearance when the entire outfit is seen at once, but there is no use in trying to be becomingly gowned when going on an automobile trip. What is practical should be worn. There may be a smart short costume—that is, a short skirt and attractive blouse and a short jacket to match the skirt; but if for cold weather there must be a long shapeless coat of heavy cloth or fur, with sleeves that fasten

Short Gown of natural-color pongee with raised square silk dots in a contrasting color; smoked-pearl buttons.

into a cuff at the wrist, and with doublebreasted fronts. A hood is by far the most comfortable sort of headgear, but a small hat with an automobile veil or with a long scarf that ties over the ears and in front is absolutely necessary. It is nonsense for a woman to go off on an automobile trip, or, in fact, to go in for any kind of sport, unless she is suitably dressed.

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It is by no means easy to combine the ble thing, and the first rule to be observed is practical and the becoming, but it is a possi- that the picturesque is to be most carefully

avoided. The picturesque woman

Blue Alpaca bathing suit with trimmings of white alpaca and narrow black - braid; flat braid rosettes on the waist and skirt. the dressing of American play

is out of place in outdoor sports. She looks picturesque if suitably dressed; otherwise she looks like a caricature, no matter how blessed she may be with natural beauty. Light shoes to wear with short skirts are in fashion again, and very much more attention is now paid to being well shod than has been the case for some time. When expense is no object these shoes are, as a rule, made to order. There are heavy tan shoes with high gaiters attached—the gaiters made of some checked material — that are thought very smart, but they are certainly heavy and very warm. Then there are shoes in tan leather with high gaiters or leggings to match, and there are also the low-cut tan shoes to be worn with spats of light or dark color. The water-proof shoe is a necessity for the woman who goes in for golf. For tennis there is, of course, the tennis shoe with the rubber sole; but even the simplest and plainest shoe is, in these days of luxury, expected to be suited to the foot of each wearer—that is, it must fit and must be well made, and above all things it must be kept in good order. American women have been famous abroad for their well shod feet, and now there is just as much care taken of shoes intended for outdoor wear as in choosing slippers to go with the ball gown. The heels are higher on the walking boots, but they are the military or Cuban heels — not the Louis XV. style, which are absurd even on a walking shoe and entirely impossible for outing shoes. For tennis, which will be the fashionable game this summer, it is necessary, in fact, to wear rubber - soled heelless shoes. This is a strict requirement of all clubs. A famous English woman golf-player said recently that what surprised her during her observations of a golfing season here was the contrast between

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ers on fair and on stormy days.

dressed than the English in
fine weather, but when obliged
to play in bad weather they
seemed to care nothing for ap-
pearances, whereas the English-
woman wears practically the
same costume under all kinds
of skies. This is a timely
criticism, as it is true of many
golf-players. The only way to
learn of our faults is to be told
of them, so the wise young
woman who reads this will do
well to adopt her last winter's
cravenette or cloth walking
skirt for wet golfing days or
tennis matches when the dew is
still on the grass.
The heavy brown linens in
the various weaves are about
the best material possible for
summer outing gowns. They
keep clean, launder well, and
have every virtue. They are
rather heavy in the close weave,
but for women and young girls
who object to this weight, there
are loose canvas weaves of
linen in the various shades of
écru and brown, and also in
colors, which are quite light in
weight.
Pongee in the natural color
is very useful, too, for tennis
gowns, being cool and light and
serviceable. It is made up, even for
such uses, in pretty blouses with inser-
tions of écru lace. The white pongees
are beautiful, and come in many grades.
They make handsomer frocks than does
white linen, but they are hardly more
useful or satisfactory. -
Many of these so-called outing gowns
are elaborately embroidered. In fact,
embroidered linen gowns have not in
the least gone out of favor, although
the designs and style of the embroidery
vary from season to season. Much
drawn-work and Norwegian open-work
are used, and cross-stitch embroidery in
colors on bands of linen canvas makes
a very pretty and effective trimming
for the linen and thin silk waists. On
brown linen it is especially good, as

She said that the American women were more smartly

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Bathing suit of white serge with blue edges and blue stitching; full white serge belt, with enamelled buckle.

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Girl's boilero And skirt of dark blue or red limen or galatea with a cord of the same on all edges; sleeve and bolero cut in one, with seam on shoulder continued down the arm.

pattern to follow and that taste is shown in the making. Even the silks that are so fashionable this year are perfectly possible for home workers. Silk is a very fashionable material at the present moment, and is not out of the reach even of women with small means. There never were so many attractive colorings and designs in lowpriced silks as are to be found at the present moment, and while it is fashionable to have clothes very elaborately trimmed, it is also fashionable to have rather plain effects—that is to say, the material itself can be used for trimming in place of lace and embroidery. A plain or figured taffeta silk, a pongee or a foulard gown, can be made up with a pleated skirt, or with a skirt gathered at the sides and back, and trimmed with ruchings of the material or tucks around the foot of the skirt, or with flounces of the material finished only with cordings or shirrings.

The waist can be in surplice effect, or there can be a short jacket, to be worn over a simple net waist and trimmed to match the skirt. In this way there need not be an inch of lace or embroidary bought for the gown.

White muslin frocks—and by muslin is meant all thin wash materials in white—are very fashionable. They may look rather smarter if they have a silk lining, but the colored lawn linings are just as effective, and in truth French dressmakers often use them in preference to the silk. There are several new linings this year that have a soft silk finish, and these are very effective under thin materials. Although rather too light to be satisfactory under heavy materials, they will wear well under thin goods.

Gown of old-rose linen with bands of pink and white embroidery; yoke and sleeve puff of tucked white mainsook or lawn.

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