Reminiscences of an Octogenarian of the City of New York (1816 to 1860)

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Harper & Brothers, 1896 - 581 pagine
 

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Pagina 366 - We have repeatedly said, and we once more insist, that the great principle embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of American Independence, that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, is sound and just; and that if the slave States, the cotton States, or the gulf States only, choose to form an independent nation THEY HAVE A CLEAR MORAL RIGHT TO DO so.
Pagina 367 - The Tribune," as its name imports, will labor to advance the interests of the People, and to promote their Moral, Social and Political well-being. The immoral and degrading Police Reports, Advertisements and other matter which have been allowed to disgrace the columns of our leading Penny Papers will be carefully excluded from this, and no exertion spared to render it worthy of the hearty approval of the virtuous and refined, and a welcome visitant at the family fireside.
Pagina 366 - Southern people have become conclusively alienated from the Union, and anxious to escape from it, WE WILL DO OUR BEST TO FORWARD THEIR VIEWS.
Pagina 16 - This was the last night of that suburban place of amusement ; and, lo and behold ! when I entered, I found myself on the floor of the most splendid and largest theatre I ever saw, — a place capable of seating comfortably six or eight thousand persons. The pit or area of the pavilion is provided with some hundred small white tables and movable chairs, by which people are enabled to congregate into little squads, and take their ices between the acts. In front of the stage is a beautiful fountain,...
Pagina 394 - A CARD: The widow, brother and nephew Lorenzo of the late much respected John Delmonico tender their heartfelt thanks to the friends, Benevolent societies and Northern Liberty Fire Engine Company, who accompanied his remains to his last home. The establishment will be reopened to-day, under the same firm of Delmonico Brothers, and no pains of the bereft family will be spared to give general satisfaction. Restaurant, bar-room, and private dinners, No. 2 South William Street; furnished rooms No. 76...
Pagina 94 - ... fortunate brethren; Washington Square, Union Square, Madison Square, and Bryant Park, all owing their existence as pleasure-grounds to prior use as pauper burial-places. About this time an ordinance was enacted prohibiting the interment of human bodies below Grand Street, under a penalty of $250. 1822. At No. 269 Broadway, near Warren Street, there was the confectionery shop of Peter Cotte, who occasionally received a bunch of bananas, which he displayed outside to the wonder of a great proportion...
Pagina 137 - Atlantic in steamers of ten or fifteen thousand tons' burthen, will probably be surprised to learn that the tonnage of the Liverpool and Havre packets did not reach four hundred. The Edward Quesnel was but 325, and the Queen Mab and Don Quixote were much less; I am of the conviction the tonnage was in both cases under 250. In this year a stage ran from the Bull's Head, in the Bowery, to Manhattanville. Samuel Woodworth founded the Weekly Mirror in 1822, and in this year joined George P. Morris and...
Pagina 136 - In the matter of public groups, the necessities of the poor have greatly ministered to the advantage of their more fortunate brethren; Washington Square, Union Square, Madison Square, and Bryant Park, all owing their existence as pleasure-grounds to prior use as pauper burial-places. About this time an ordinance was enacted prohibiting the interment of human bodies below Grand Street, under a penalty of $250.
Pagina 30 - Corporation having granted the ground free fora period of ten years, with the condition that the building was to become the property of the city at the termination of the grant.
Pagina 152 - Prince of Wales. Castle Garden (Castle Clinton), originally a small fortified island off the Battery, known as Fort George, had been leased by the city to a Mr. Marsh, who converted it into a day and evening resort. The entire portion facing the bay and river at the top of the parapet wall was floored for a very convenient width, with seats at the sides, and being protected by awnings in the day, it was, in connection with the character of the citizens that patronized it both day and evening, without...

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