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LOUIS LOEB, 1866-1909.

Drawing by Leo Mielziner at the Metropolitan Museum, New York.

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Obituaries
October, 1907, to October, 1909

AIKEN, WILLIAM MARTIN, F. A. I. A.—An architect, died in New York City, Dec. 7, 1908. He was born in Charleston, S. C., April 1, 1855; he received his .# education in the private schools of that city; attended University of the Sout 1872.745. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1877-79. He was in the office of H. H. Richardson 1880-82, William R. Emerson 1882-84, and practiced in Cincinnati 1886-95. As Supervising Architect of the Treasury, Washington, D. C., 1895-97, he , designed the Government Buildings for the expositions at Atlanta, Nashville and Omaha, the U. S. Mint at Denver, and numerous post-offices, court houses, and custom houses. While Consulting Architect for the Borough of Manhattan, New York City, 1901-02, he remodeled the interior of the City Hall and of the County Court, House. , Among his more recent works are the Roper Hospital in Charleston, S., C., and the Twenty-third Street Public Baths in the City of New York, in which latter work he was associated with Mr. Arnold W. Brunner. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1889; was a member of the New York. Chapter, of the Architectural League of New York, and of the Century Association. He collaborated with Russell Sturgis in compiling the Dictionary of Architecture. ALDEN, FRANK E.—An architect, died Sept. 15, 1908, at his summer residence at Edgartown, Mass., aged forty-nine years. . He was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. At the time of his death he was a member of the firm of Alden & Harrow of Pittsburg, architects of the Carnegie Institute Building, and of most of the large office buildings in that city. He was a member of the Architectural. League 9t. New York, ARMBRUSTER, OTTO HERMAN.—An illustrator and scene painter, died in New York o, A"; 15, 1908. He was born in Cincinnati, O., Aug. 28, 1865, and was a pupil of M. Armbruster. He was a member of the Salmagundi and Kitokat Clubs in New York. ARNOLD, JOHN KNOWLTON.—A portrait painter, died in Providence, R. I., Ma 31, 1909, aged 75 years. Several governors and other distinguished men of Rhode Island were, among his sitters, AVRAM, NATHANIEL.—A sculptor, died early in November, 1907, in New York. He was born in Roumania twenty-three years ago, and came to New York when eighteen #5 of age. He had worked with H. A. MacNeil and Karl Bitter. BACHER, OTTO HENRY, A.N.A.—A painter, etcher and illustrator, died at his home in Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y., Aug. 16, 1909. He was born in Cleveland, Q., March 31, 1856. He was a pupil of Duveneck in Cincinnatio of Carolus. Duran, Boulanger and Lefebvre in Paris, and spent some time with Whistler in Venice. His book, “With Whistler in Venice,” was published in 1908. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1906, was a member of the Society of American Artists, and of the Society of Illustrators. He received an honorable mention at the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901, and a silver medal for etching at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. BARNARD, EDWARD HERBERT.-A painter, died April 16, 1909, in Westerly, Mass. He was born at Belmont, Mass., July 10, 1855. He studied architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and painting at the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and later in Paris with Boulanger, Lefebvre and Collin. He received the second Jordan prize in Boston, medals from the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association of Boston, and honorable mention at the Tennessee Centennial, Nashville, 1897. He was a member of the St. Botolph Club and the Boston Water Color Club. - - BECK, CAROL H.-A portrait painter, died in Philadelphia, Oct. 15, 1908. She was born in Philadelphia, forty-nine years ago; was a pupil of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and also studied in Dresden and in Paris. She was awarded the Mary Smith prize at the Pennsylvania *ś in 1899. From the foundation of the Wilstach Collection, now in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, she edited its catalog. . She was a member of the Plastic Club and of the Fellowship of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She painted portraits of o prominent men, among them Governor Pattison for the State Capitol of Pennsylvania; Swathmore College has several of her works and others are in the Masonic Temple and the University of Pennsylvania. Her brother, the Hon. James, M. Beck, has established the Carol H. Beck Memorial Gold Medal, to be awarded annually to the best portrait shown at the exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, painted by an American artist within three years of the time of its exhibition. he first award was made in 1909

BRICHER, ALFRED THOMPSON, A.N.A.—A marine painter, died at his home, New Dorp, Staten Island, N. Y., Sept. 30, 1908. . He was born at Portsmouth, N., H., April 10, 1837, and was educated at the Academy of Newburyport, Mass. In 1851 he entered a mercantile house in Boston and studied art in his leisure hours; in 1858 he took up art as a profession and ten years later settled in New York. He was elected a member of the American Water Color Society in 1873, an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1879, and was also a member of the Boston

Art Club. BRISTOL, JOHN BUNYON, N.A.—A landscape painter, died Aug. 31, 1909, in New York City. He was born at Hillsdale, N. Y., in 1826, and was chiefly self-taught, although for a short time he studied with Henry Ary at Hudson, N. Y. He received a medal at the Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia, 1876, honorable mention at the Paris Exposition of 1889 and a bronze medal at the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1861 and an Academician in 1875; and was a member of the Artists' Fund

Society. BRUCE, JOSEPH A.—A painter of fruits and flowers, died at his home in Brooklyn, New York City, June 8, 1909. He was seventy years of age and a native of Eng

land. BUSH, CHARLES GREEN.—A caricaturist, died at Camden, S. C., May 21, 1909. He was born in Boston in September, 1842; his father, was the first American consul at Hong §§ He was educated at the Boston Latin School and for a time was a çadet at the Naval Academy, at Annapolis; leaving there he became an illustrator for Harper's and later studied in Paris under Bonnat. On his return to the United States he became caricaturist for the “New York Herald,” and since 1897 had been on the staff of the “World.” CHAMPNEY, BENJAMIN.—A landscape Fo died Dec. 11, 1907, at his home in oburn, Mass. He was born in New Ipswich, N. H., Nov. 20, 1817; obtained his first experience in drawing at the lithographic establishment of Pendleton in Boston, and in 1841, on the advice of Washington Allston, went to Paris to study. He exhibited at the Salons of 1843 and 1844, and in 1847 painted a panorama of the Rhine, which he brought back with him to Boston. He was one of the founders of the Boston Art Club and one of its early presidents. He published “Sixty Years' Memoirs of Art and Artists.” CHILDS, JOSEPH.-An illustrator, whose home was in New York, died in Westport, Conn., Sept. 10, 1909, ago. about forty years. CLARK, THEODORE MINOT, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in Boston April 30, 1909. He was born in Boston in 1845 and was graduated from Harvard at the age of twenty. For twenty-seven years he was editor of the “American Architect,” and from 1880 to 1887 was professor in charge of the department of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was the author of “Building Superintendence,” “Rural School Architecture” and other works; was actively interested in civics and a director of the Working men's Building Association. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1877 and a Fellow in 1881. CLARKE, CHARLES JULIAN, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died March 10, 1908. He was born at Locust Grove, Franklin Co., Ky., Dec. 16, 1836; studied architecture under Dr. E. A. Grant, in Louisville, and after the War became associated with the firm of Bradshaw & iro, architects of that city; in 1891 he formed a partnership with Arthur Loomis under the name of Clarke & Loomis. He was elected a member of the Western Association of Architects in 1884, and by act of consolidation became a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1889; a charter member of the Engineers and Architects Club, he became its president in 1896 and was the first president, of the Louisville Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, formed in 1908, but did not live to assume his duties. COB B, OSCAR, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in Seattle, Wash., May 12, 1908. He was born at Robinsons, Aroostook Co., Me., March 12, 1842; began as a carpenter and joiner, and, as was customary at that time, made plans and drawings for, buildings; in 1871 he went to Chicago while that city was still burning, and opened an architectural office. About jo he commenced building theatres and made this work his specialty, and was the architect of over two hundred. He was elected a member of the Western Association of Architects in 1884, and, by act of consolidation in 1889, became a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. COLLIER, CHARLES MY LES.—A marine painter, died at his summer home, Gloucester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1908. He was born at Hampton, Va., in 1836, and was selftaught. or many years he lived in Memphis, Tenn.; fought in the navy, and retired with the rank of colonel. Recently his home was in New York City, where he devoted himself to painting. He received a silver medal at the Charleston Ex|. in 1902 and the Isidor prize at the Salmagundi Club, of which he was a in ender. COMAN, SARAH.—An art teacher for many years in the New York Public Schools, died in M. city Nov. 2, 1908, in her sixty-fourth year. She was born in Cummings, Mass. COOK, JAMES PARTHOLOMEW, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died, at his home in Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 21, 1909. He was born near London, England, in 1826, and received his education at King's College. He erected the first iron bridge over the Thames and supervised the erection of the Crystal Palace at Hyde Park in 1851. In 1854 he came to the United States, and in 1860 settled in Memphis. During the Civil War he was appointed chief of submarine batteries under William R. Hunt and after the close of the war resumed his profession. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1870 and served as a Director for three years from 1897. COPELAND, ALFRED BRYANT-A painter, died in his studio in Boston, Jan. 30 1909. He was born in that cio lived for many years in Antwerp and Paris, an returned to America in 1896. e was at one time art professor at the University of St. Louis; exhibited in the Paris Salon of 1877; his “Falling Leaves” was bought by the Boston Athenaeum. CONLEY, , WILLIAM J.-A portrait painter, died in New York City, June 10, 1909, aged about sixty years. CRAPSEY, CHARLES.—An architect, died at his home in Cincinnati, O., July 26, 1909. He was born in, that city, and had practiced his profession for thirty-four years. Most of his work, consisted of church buildings, among which may be mentioned the . Presbyterian Church at Seattle, Wash., said to be the largest church on the *iocoast. He was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects from 1881 o CURRIER, J. FRANK.—A painter, died in January, 1909, near Boston. He was born in Boston, Nov. 21, 1843; was a pupil of the Academy of . Fine Arts, in Munich Bavaria, and was a leader in the American colony there, which included Chase and Duveneck. He returned to this country only a few years ago, and an exhibition of landscape sketches, was held in New York and other cities. He is represented in the permanent collections of the Herron Art Gallery, Indianapolis, and in the St. Louis Museum. DARLING, DANIEL M.—An architect, died in New York City June 20, 1909, aged sixty-four years. He had been for many years an architect and builder in Massachusetts, but came to New York about three years ago, as the architect of the Hanover National Bank. DE CRANO, FELIX-A painter and sculptor, died at his home at Wallingford, Pa., Sept. 15, 1908. He was born in France and studied in Paris, London and Rome and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia. He was a member of the Art Club of Philadelphia and of the Philadelphia Artists' Fund Society. He had a studio in Philadelphia. DE LEMOS, THEODORE W. E., F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in New York City, April 10, 1909. He was born in Germany, June 13, 1850; studied architecture at the Berlin Royal Academy of Buildings; came to the United States in 1881. He became associated with the late . Henry Fernbach in designing the Eden Musée, and completed it after the death of Mr. Fernbach in 1883. The following ear he formed a partnership with A. W. Cordes and under the firm name of De emos & Cordes built some of the largest department stores and office buildings in New York City, among them being the Siegel-Cooper, Macy and Adams department stores; the Speyer & Co., Kuhn, Loeb & Co., and the New York Count National Bank buildings; the Arion Club and the Grand Central Palace, as well as many country homes. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1886 and a Fellow in 1889. EIDLITZ, LEOPOLD, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in New York City March 22, 1908. e was born in Prague, Austria, March 29, 1823; was educated at the Polytechnic in Vienna; and came to the United States when twenty years of age. When about twenty-five years of age his designs for St. George's Church in Soon, Square, New York, were accepted. Later he erected the Tabernacle at 34th St. and Sixth Ave., and the Synagogue at Fifth Ave. and 43d St., New York; and also Christ's Church in St. Louis, which has since been made the Cathedral. . Among the secular buildings designed by him are the old Produce. Exchange; the American, Exchange National Bank, the Dry, Dock Savings. Bank, the old Academy of Music in Brooklyn. He was associated with H. H. Richardson, in his work on the Capitol at Albany, and was Commissioner to overlook the work, prior to 1875. He was the author of the book “The Nature and Function of Art,” and wrote various papers for the professional press. He was one of the founders of the so Institute of Architects in 1857, and retained an active membership until is death. FEN ELLOSA, ERNEST FRANCISCO. —Educator, author, orientalist, died in London, England, Sept. 21, 1908. He was born at Salem, Mass., Feb. 18, 1853, and was aduated from Harvard in 1874 with the highest honors, in philosophy. Four years ater he went to Tokio, Japan, as Professor of Political Economy and Philosophy in the University of Tokio: in 1886 and 1887 he was Imperial Fine Arts Commissioner of Japan, and was afterward, appointed professor of aesthetics, and manager of the Tokio Fine Arts Academy, and manager of the art department of the Imperial Museum at Tokio. . He returned to the United States in 1890, and for six years was curator of the department of oriental art in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. He was professor of English literature, in the Imperial Normal, School, Tokio, from 1897 to 1900, and after that lectured extensively on oriental subjects. ... He was decorated by the Emperor of Japan, with the Qrder of the Rising Sun, and the Sacred Mirror. He wrote, two volumes of poems, “East and West,” and “The Discovery of America,” and left manuscripts of several works on Japanese and, Chinese art which will be edited and published by his widow, who is herself the author o several novels, and is known by the pen, name of Sidney McCall.” He has been interred at the family home, on.” Spring Hill, Ala.

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