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FFOULKE, CHARLES MATHER.—A tapestry expert, died in New York City, April 14, 1909. . He was born in Quakertown, Bucks County, Pa., in 1841, and was educated in the schools of the Quakers. From 1861 to isz2 he was in the wool busi. ness in Philadelphia, and then went to Europe for two years, to study art, and again in 1885 for five years. He accumulated one of the largest and most varied collection of tapestries in the world, including the famous, Barberini set. . He established near Florence, Italy, a school for the repairing of tapestries, and he wrote a number of works on tapestries and also lectured on the subject. . His home was in Washington, D. C., and he was the president of the Nii. Society of the Fine Arts of that city. FLORIAN, WALTER.—A painter, died in New York City, April 1, 1909. He was born in that city in 1878, and, as a mere boy, began copyin at the Metropolitan Museum. He studied at the Art Students' League of New York, and later went to Paris and studied at Julian's, where he won a gold medal; he spent two years in Spain and one in Holland, during which time he painted a portrait of Joseph Israels, which was exhibited at the National Academy of Design in New York and at the St. Louis Exposition, where it won a silver medal. Other portraits by him are those of Çarl Schurz, Gen. Joseph Wheeler, Father Ducey ind" the children of Chief Justice Fuller. He also studied sculpture and was a pupil of Augustus Saint

Gaudens. FREER, FREDERICK WARREN, A.N.A.—A painter, died at his home in Chicago, March 7, 1908. He was born in Chicago, June 16, 1849; was educated in the public schools of that city, and studied art at the Royal Academy in Munich. From 1880 to 1890 he lived in New York; then returned to his native city, and was instructor of drawing and painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. He was awarded a medal at the Columbian, Exposition, Chicago, 1893; a bronze medal at the Pan-American £o Buffalo, 1901 ; a silver medal at the Charleston Exposition, 1902; the Cahn prize at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1902; the Chicago Art Club medal and prize in 1902; and a bronze medal at the flouisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. He was an Associate of the National Academy of Design, a member of the American Water. Color Society, New York, Water Color Club Artists' Fund Society, Chicago, Society of , Artists, Society of Western Artists, and o since 1906, of the Chicago Academy of Design. GOTT, JACKSON COALE, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in Baltimore, July 8, 1909. He was born September 10, 1829, near Lake Roland, Baltimore County, Md. Among the principal buildings erected by him are: Western Maryland College, Westminster; Maryland Penitentiary: Masonic Temple, and Peninsula Hospital at Salisbury, Md. ; and many private homes and business buildings in Baltimore. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1871 and a Fellow in 1889. HALE, HERBERT DUDLEY, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in New York City, Nov. 10, 1908. He was a son of Dr. Edward Everett Hale, and was born in Dorchester, Mass., {*} 22, 1866. After being graduated from Harvard in 1888, he went to Paris and studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. On his return to this country, he formed a partnership with James G., Rogers, and, under the firm name of Hale & Rogers, designed the Engineers Building, New York City; Shelby County Court House, Memphis, Tenn., and the South Boston High School. , He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1902 and a Fellow in 1907; was a member of the New York Chapter of the A.I.A., of the Beaux-Arts Society, and University, Players and Harvard clubs. HAMMATT, EDWARD SEY MOUR, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home at Davenport, Ia., Aug. 24, 1907. He was born at Geneseo, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1856; studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston, and then spent four ears in the office of Ware and Van Brunt in that city, and later four years with ardenbergh & Le Brun in New York. In 1883 he opened an office at Davenport, Ia., and continued in business there until a few months before his death. Amon the more notable buildings, erected by him may be mentioned four schools in Roc Island, many business buildings and churches in Davenport, and Episcopal churches in many Iowa towns and cities. . He was elected a member of the Western Association of Architects in 1884, and, by the act of consolidation, became a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1889. HARDING, GEORGE EDWARD, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in , New Jersey in October, 1907. He was born at Bath, Me., in 1843; acquired his education in engineering, at Columbia, College, New York City, and for many years had, as partner William Tyson Gooch. Among the notable buildings designed by , Harding Gooch are the Postal Telegraph o: Cable building, the Holland House, and other commercial buildings in New York. He became a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1894. HARRIS, C. HARTMAN K.—A young painter, was drowned in the Charles River, near Boston, Aug. 11, 1909. is home was at Devon, Pa. He was a pupil, of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, and had exhibited there for several years. HASKELL, još. G., F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at Lawrence, Kan., Nov. 25, 1907. He was born in Milton, Vt., Feb. 5, 1832. When eleven years of age, he was obliged to earn his own living, and worked on a farm, but determined to be an architect, and at seventeen apprenticed himself, to a carpenter; at twenty-one he entered Wesleyan Seminary at Wilbraham , and later went, to Brown, University, Providence, supporting himself meanwhile by working at his trade during vacations. In 1855 he entered an architect's office in Boston; in 1857 he went to Kansas to live, and practiced his profession constantly, except during the War, when he was quartermaster. Among the noted buildings which he erected are the State §. the University of Lawrence, the State Insane Asylum, and Washburn College at Topeka. He was elected a member of the Western Association of Architects in 1885, and, by the act of consolidation, became a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1889. HILL, THOMAS.—A landscape painter, died at his home at Raymond, Madera County Cal., July 1, 1908. He was born at Birmingham, England, Sept. 11, 1829, and came to the United States in 1841, settling with his parents at Taunton, Mass. He moved to Philadelphia and became a pupil of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, but was principally self-taught. Going west in 1861, he painted portraits and did other figure !. for six years, receiving first prize at the Art Union in San Francisco in 1865. His later works, however, were all landscapes, the best known being his “Yosemite Valley.” . He received a medai and diploma at the Philadelphia Exposition in 1876, and the Temple silver medal at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1884; in all he received thirty-one awards. At the time of his death he was a member of the Boston Art Club and of the San Francisco Art Association. HILTON, HOWARD KING, A.A.I.A.—An architect, died at Fowey, a seaport town of Cornwall, England, whither he had gone in search of health, on July 22, 1909. He was born in Providence, R. I., April 17, 1867; was graduated from Mowry and Goff’s school in 1885; , entered the office of W. H. Colwell; in 1892 began the independent practice of architecture, and in 1902 took into partnership F. Ellis Jackson of Providence. Among his works are the Centerville M. A. Church, the girls' dormitory at the East Greenwich Academy, the East Providence public library, the surgical ward and operating theatre of the Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital, and the residence of Hon. Robert B. Treat at Centerville, and of M. K. Washburn, at East Greenwich. He became a member of the Rhode Island Chapter of the A.I.A. in 1897, and was its secretary from 1903 to 1904, and treasurer 1904 to 1907; he was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1901. fiOEGGER, AUGUSTU.S.—A painter, died Jan. 2, 1908, as the result of injuries received while trying to save his paintings from a fire in his Philadelphia studio. He was born in Switzerland, came to this country when a youth, and was sixty-two ears old at the time of his death. HOPKIN, ROBERT.—A marine painter, died at his home in Detroit, Mich., March 21, 1909. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, Jan. 3, 1832, and went to Detroit with his parents eleven years later. . His most io public work is a series of six paintings for the Cotton Exchange, New Orleans; he painted many drop curtains for Chicago, Denver, Toronto, and other cities. He was at, one time presi; dent of the Detroit Association of Arts, and was also a member of the Society of Western Artists and of the Detroit Water Color Society. HORNBLOWER, JOSEPH COERTEN, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at The Hague, Holland, Aug. 21, 1908. He was born in Patterson, N.J., in 1848, was graduated from Yale in 1869, and completed his architectural studies in the atelier of J. L. Pascal in Paris. In the practice of his profession in Washington he was associated with James. Rush, Marshall for about thirty years, under the firm name of Horn; blower & Marshall. Th; won, in competition, the Baltimore Custom House, and they are the architects of the New National Museum; many private residences in Washington were designed by them. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1893, and at one time was a director. HOSM ER, HARRIET.—A sculptor, died at her home in Watertown, Mass., Feb. 21 1908. She was born in that town Oct. 6, 1830; was educated at Lenox, and studied drawing and modeling in Boston, and anatomy at the Medical College, St. Louis. In 1852, she went to Rome, and became a pupil of John Gibson, the English sculptor. She, executed many ideal, figures, among the most popular being a statue of “Puck”; her “Beatrice Cenci” is in the St. Louis public library. She was also noted for her writing of both prose, and poetry. HOWARTH, F. M.—An illustrator, died at his home in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 22, 1908, at the age of forty-three. His work appeared regularly in “Life,” “Puck,” and “Judge,” until he became connected with a Chicago syndicate. How LAND, Ai FRED CöR ÉLitjš. N.A.—A, painter, died at Pasadena, Cal, March 17, 1909. He was born at Walpole, N. H., Feb. 12, 1838; after graduating from the Walpole Academy, he studied art in Boston and New York, was a pupil of the Royal Academy and of Albert Flamm in Düsseldorf and of Emile Lambinet in Paris. e was elected an Associate of the National *** of Design in 1874 and became an Academician in 1882; and was a member of the Artists' Fund Society of New York and of the Century Association. ... He was a regular, exhibitor in New York and his work was frequently seen in Paris and Munich; he is represented in the ermanent collections of the Layton Art Gallery, Milwaukee, and Yale University, K. Haven. His summer home was the Roof-Tree, Williamstown, Mass., and during the winter he had a studio in New York. . - - HOWE, FRANK MAYNARD, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home , in Kansas City, Jan. 4, 1909. He was born in Arlington, Mass., July 20, 1849, where he received his early education at the public schools and at Cotting Academy. He , took a course at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and in 1868 entered the office of Ware and Van Brunt of Boston. In 1878 he went abroad for study, and a few years after his return he became associated with Henry Van Brunt, and the firm ofo, Brunt & Howe was formed, which lasted twenty-five years. In 1885 the firm, opened an office in Kansas City, of which Mr. Howe was in charge. Among their most important buildings in the East are the Harvard Medical School, several of the buildings at Wellesley, and the public library at Cambridge; in the West they erected, the library of the University of Michigan, and the railroad terminals at Portland, Ore. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1899 and a Fellow in 1901. HOWE, JOHN EDWARD.—An architect, died at Southampton, Long Island, Sept. 16, 1908, in his forty-fifth year. He was born in Cambridge, Mass., and, after graduating from Harvard University in 1884, studied architecture successively with the firms of Hartwell & Richardson and Andrews & Jaques in Boston, and McKim, Mead & White in New York. At the time of his death he was a member of the firm of Warren & Wetmore of New York. HYNEMAN, HERMAN N.—A painter, died in Philadelphia, Dec. 23, 1907. He was born in that city, July 27, 1859; studied in Paris under Bonnát. The latter part of his life he had a studio in New York. He was a member of the Art Club of Philadelphia and of the Salmagundi Club of New York. JOHNSON, DAVID, N. A.—A landscape painter, died at his home at Walden, Orange County, N. Y., on Jan. 30, 1908. e was born in New York, May 10, 1827, and was chiefly self-taught, although he had a few lessons from Jasper F. Cropsey. He was one of the last survivors of the “Hudson River School” of American landscape ainters. He never visited Europe, but exhibited his “Housatonic River” at the aris Salon of 1877. He received a medal at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876, and a medal in 1878, from the Massachusetts Charitable, Mechanics Association of Boston. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Design in 1861. KOEIILER, PAUL R.—A landscape painter, died at Colorado Springs, Colo., in July (?) 1909. He was born in New York about thirty-four years ago, and was entirely self-taught. Although obliged to do commercial work, he found time to execute a few landscapes in pastel which gave promise. KURTZ, CHARLES M.–Director of the Alogo; Art Gallery, Buffalo, died March 21, 1909. He was born in Newcastle, Pa., in 1855, and was graduated from Washington and Jefferson of: in 1876, receiving from his alma mater the degree of A.M. in 1879 and that of Ph.D. in 1902. For three years he was a student at the National Academy of Design, New York, and later was for many years an art writer. For nine years he was editor of “National Academy Notes,” an annual publication, givin illustrations and notes of the pictures in the Spring Exhibition of the National Academy of Design. In 1891 he left newspaper work to become assistant chief of the Department of Fine Arts of the World's Columbian . Exposition at Chicago, at the close of which he was tendered the art directorship of the St. Louis Exposition. In 1894, and during the five years following, he visited the art centres of this country and Europe in the interests of that exposition. He was appointed assistant chief of the Department of Art of , the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in August, 1901, and directed the installation of the paintings in the United States section, for which he was awarded a fo! medal. For services in the interest of Bulgarian art, he was created officer of the Order of Merit, by prince Ferdinand. He became director of the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, in January, 1905, which position he held at the time of his death. (See portrait.) LAMBERT, JOHN.—A portrait, painter, died at his home in Jenkintown, Pa., Dec. 29, 1907. He was born in Philadelphia, March 10, 1861; was a pupil of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, of the Art Students' League of New York and of Merson in Paris. He was a member of the Art Club of Philadelphia, and of the Fellowship of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. LEONARD, HELEN.—An illustrator, died in Wilmington, Del., April 21, 1908, at the age of twenty-three. . She came originally from San Francisco, studied with Frank Brangwyn in London and at the time of her death was working with How

ard Pyle. LIND, EDMUND GEORGE, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at Wilmington, Del., July 14, 1909. He was born in London, England, June 18, 1829, and studied at the Government School of Design at Somerset House. He practiced in London from 1852 until 1855, when he went to Baltimore. His most important works were the Peabody Institute, Masonic Temple, Franklin Square Church, and Johns Memorial Church in Baltimore ; the Louise Home and the Arlington Hotel in Washington, and many notable buildings in Virginia, North Carolina and . Georgia. During Grant's administration he was made assistant supervising architect, and, at that time built the United States Custom House and Post office at Mobile, Ala. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1857 and a Fellow in 1870; he was its vice-president, 1871-72, and again in 1876-77; was a charter member of the Baltimore Chapter of the Institute and at one time was resident. LOEB, LOUIS, N. A.—A painter and illustrator, died at Canterbury, N. H., July 12, 190 He was born in Cleveland, O., Nov. 7, 1866, but lived the latter part of his life in New York. He studied with Gérôme in Paris. His first recognition was an honorable mention in the Paris Salon of 1895; he received a third class medal at the Salon in 1897, a silver medal for drawing and a silver medal for painting at the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, , 1901; the Hallgarten prize, at the National Academy of Design in 1902; the Webb prize at the Society of American Artists, 1903; a silver medal for painting and a silver medal for illustration at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904; the Carnegie prize at the Society of American

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