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Artists in 1905; and first prize, Society of Washington Artists, 1906. He is represented in several public galleries, his “Temple of the Winds” being at the Metro: politan Museum of Art, New York. He was elected an Associate of the National og of Design, in 1901, and an Academician in 1906; he had been a member of the Society of American Artists since 1900, the Architectural League of New York from 1902, and of the Society of Illustrators. (See portrait.) LOOP, JEANNETTE SHEPPERD HARRISON, A.N.A.—A painter, died at her home at Saratoga, N. Y., April 17, 1909. She was born at New Haven, Conn., March 5, 1840, and was a pupil of Louis Bail in New Haven and of Henry A. Loop in New York, whom she married in 1865. In 1875 she was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design, to which she frequently sent large decorative canvases, as well as portraits. MacDONALD, JAMES ALEXANDER WILSON.—A sculptor, died at his home in Yonkers, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1908. He was born at Steubenville, O., Aug. 25, 1824, and was, in the publishing business in St. Louis, but from his thirtieth year he devoted himself to art. He made the first portrait bust cut in marble west of the Mississippi—that of Senator James T. Benton of Missouri. After the Civil War he came to New York, and his bust of Charles O'Connor is in the Appellate Court, and that of James T. Brady is in the Law Library, while his bronze statue of FitzGreene Halleck is in Central park, and his Washington Irving in Prospect Park,

rooklyn. MARCIUS-SIMONS, PINCKNEY.—A painter, died at Bayreuth, Bavaria, July 17, 1909. He was born in New York City in 1867, and began painting at twelve years of age. He was chiefly self-taught, haunting the studios of artists and studying architecture, perspective, and anatomy. He was first known for his genre pictures; his success, however, was attained in his ideal works, and culminated in the poetic ren: dering of the “Nibelungen Ring” in a series of elaborate pictures, wherein he tried to orchestrate his pictures as a musician scores. MALLETTE, JAMES C.—Formerly professor of architecture at Peddle Institute, died at Trenton, N. J., Feb. 22, 1908. McCORD, PETER B.-An illustrator and caricaturist, died at his home in Newark, N. J., Nov. 9, 1908. He was about forty years old and a native of St. Louis. For the last eight years he had been employed on the Newark Evening News. He recently wrote a book, “The Wolf,” which he also illustrated. McCORD, GEORGE HERBERT, A.N.A.—A landscape and marine painter, died at his home in New York, April 6, 1909. He was born in that city Aug. 1, 1848, and studied art under Moses Morse and later traveled extensively in Europe. He received a medal at the New Orleans Exposition in 1885; one at the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Institute at Boston, and a bronze medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1880 and was a member of the American Water Color Society, the Brooklyn Art Club, the Salmagundi Club, the Artists Fund Society and the Lotos Club. McKIM, CHARLES FOLLEN, F.A.I.A.—One of the foremost American architects, died Sept. 14, 1909, at his summer home at St. James, Long Island, N. Y. He was born in Chester County, Pa. Aug. 24, 1847. He spent a year at the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard University and in 1867 went to Paris and entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts as a pupil of Daumet. On his return from Europe in 1872 he established himself as an architect in New York; in 1877 he was joined in partnership by William R. Mead, and two years later by Stanford White, when the firm of McKim, Mead and White was formed. Some of the best known works executed by the firm are: The Boston Public Library; the Rhode Island State House at Providence; Madison Square Garden, New York; the Agricultural Building at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago. In New York they erected Columbia, University Library, the Hall of Fame of the New York University, the Museum of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, University and Century clubs, the J. P. Morgan o, (see frontispiece) and the Pennsylvania Railroad Station, now being constructed. e received a gold medal at the Paris Exposition of 1900; King Edward of England presented him a gold medal in 1903 for valuable services to architecture, and the American Institute of Architects, awarded him its gold medal in 1909, although the presentation was not made until . December 15, 1909, when it was received by his partner, Mr. Mead. (See portrait and addresses on presentation of medal.) Harvard gave him the degree of M.A. in 1893; Columbia that of Litt.D. in 1904, and the University of Pennsylvania the degree of LL.D. in 1909. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1875 and a Fellow in 1877 and was its o; from 1902 to 1903; he was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1905 and an Academician in 1907. He was president of the American Academy at Rome; was an honorary member of the National Society of Mural Painters and the National Sculpture Society; had been a member of the Architectural League of New York since 1889; was a charter member of the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects, a trustee of the Metropolitan Museum or Art, besides serving on the Congressional Commission for the Improvement of the Park System of the City of Washington, etc. MINOTT, JOSEPH OTIS.—A painter, died at Paris, France, May 14, 1909. His home was in New York but he had lived abroad for some years, and at the time of his death was arranging to {{ the portraits of King Edward and Queen Alexandra. MUNZIG, GEORGE CHICKERING.-A portrait painter, died in New York, March 5, 1908. He was born in Boston in 1859 and studied at the Brimmer Art School in that city and later in Paris. Returned to Boston in 1872 and worked there until a few years ago, when he settled in New York. He painted portraits of many society people and of Madame Melba and other artists.

MYERS, ELIJAH E.—An architect, died at his home in Detroit, March 5, 1909. He was born in Philadelphia in 1832 and was noted for having designed a number of State Capitols, including those of Michigan, Texas, Colorado, Idaho and Utah, and the Parliament Buildings at Rio Janeiro, Brazil. NICKERSON, EDWARD IRVING, A.A.I.A.—Died at his home in Providence, R. I., March 15, 1908. He was born in Pawtucket, R. I., Sept. 13, 1845. About 1862 he entered the office of Clifton A. Hall as a student of architecture and in 1871 began business for himself. . Among the buildings erected by him were the chapel of the Beneficent Congregational Church in Providence, the Miller Building in Pawtucket and, many private residences. He became an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1875 and was one of the founders of the Rhode Island Chapter, of which he was an officer from 1882 to 1903, being president four times during this period. His, architectural library, was given to the Providence Public Library. NOE, THEQDORE CUYLER.—An art dealer, died at his home in Orange, N. J., Jan. 18, o . He was fifty-one years old and had been in business in New York a number of years. NOCROSS, EMILY D.—A painter and art teacher, died at her home in Cambridge, Mass., on March 31, 1909, aged sixty years. She studied art in Venice and Paris and for the last few years had been manager of the School of Painting of the Boston Museum. NORTON, CHARLES, ELIOT.-A writer and art critic, died at his home in Cambridge, Mass, Oct; 21, 1908. He was born in Cambridge, Nov. 16, 1827; was graduated from Harvard University in 1846; traveled , extensively in Europe and there met John Ruskin, whose literary executor he later became. Among his writings was a monograph on “The Portraits of Dante,” “Historical Studies of Church Building in the Middle Ages” and “Notes of Travel and Study in Italy.” He was professor of the History of Art at Harvard from 1874 until 1898 and was then elected Professor Emeritus. NOWOTTNY, VINCENT.—A painter, was killed in a runaway accident at Alderson, W. Va., on Aug. 30, 1908, aged fifty-four years. He was born in Cincinnati, O., and at the time of his death was an instructor in the Art Academy of that city. He was a pupil of Loefftz in Munich and of Bouguereau in Paris. He was a member of the Cincinnati Art Club and of the Society of Western Artists. ORTGIES, JOHN.—An art dealer, died at his home at Ardsley, N. Y., on Oct. 15, 1908. He was born in New York in 1836 and began selling pictures and art objects when still a boy. In partnership with his brother-in-law, Robert Sommerville, he organized the Fifth Avenue Art Č..." just above the old Stewart mansion at 34th Street, and handled there many important auction sales. From 1889 until his death he was connected with the American Art Association. Some of the important art collections sold under his auspices were those of John Taylor Johnston 1878; Daniel Cottier 1878; John Wolfe 1883; Albert Spencer 1879 and 1888; J. Abner Harper 1880

and 1890. OSGOOD, JULIA.—A painter and lecturer, of New York, died as the result of an automobile accident Nov. 29, 1908. PIATTI, EMILIO F.—A sculptor, died at his home in Englewood, N. J., Aug. 22, 1909, aged forty-nine years. He came from a !"; line of Italian statuaries. His best works were “Grief” for the Mausoleum of George Westcott, a statue of General Spinola and a bust of Bertha Galland. POINDEXTER, WILLIAM M., F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 20, 1908. He was born in Richmond, Va.; in 1868 he entered the office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department, and in 1874 began private practice. Among the many buildings erected by him in Washington are the Hospital of the Soldiers' Home, Columbian University Building; he designed the State Library at Richmond, Va., as well as many hotels and business structures in that State. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1882 and a Fellow in 1889; he was one of the founders of the Washington Chapter, of which he was twice president. - PORTER, BENJAMIN CURTIS, N.A.—A portrait painter, died at his home in New York, April 2, 1908. He was born at Melrose, Mass, Aug. 29, 1845. He was a pupil of Dr. Rimmer and of A. H. Bicknell in Boston and also studied in Europe. On his return he opened a studio in Boston where he was ve successful as a portrait painter; in 1883, he opened a studio in New York, and for a number 9 ears divided his time between the two cities. He received a bronze medal at the Paris Exposition of 1900; a silver medal at the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901, and silver medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1878 and an Academician in 1880, and was also a member of the Society of American Artists, National Sculpture Society, National Arts Club and Não Institute of Arts and Letters. PRANG. LOUIS.—An engraver, lithographer and art publisher, died in Los Angeles, Cal., on June 15, 1909, in the eighty-sixth year of , his age. He was born in Breslau and came to America in 1848, , when he settled in Boston. He , made a reputation through his reproductions in color of famous paintings and art objects. PURDY, ALBERT J.—A portrait painter, died at Ithaca, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1909, aged seventy-four years. His sitters in former years included many, prominent persons. RECKHARD, GARDNER ARNOLD.—A landscape painter, died at his home at Pough: keepsie, N. Y., on Dec. 22, 1908. He was born in that city in 1858 and received his art training in New York. He was president of the Vassar Arts and Crafts Society and Art Director of Vassar Institute.

SATTERLEE, WALTER, A.N.A.—A painter and illustrator, died at his home in New York, on May 28, 1908, in the sixty-fifth year of his age. He was born in Brooklyn in 1844 and was graduated from Columbia College in 1863; he was a pupil of the National Academy of Design and of Edwin White in New York; of Bonnät in Paris and Freeman in Rome. e received the Clarke prize at the National Academy of Design in 1886. . He was an Associate of the National Academy of Design and a member of , the American Water Color, Society, the New York Etching Club, the Artists' Aid Society and the Century Association. SCHELL, FRANCIS H.--A military painter, died at his home in Germantown, Pa., March 31, 1909, aged seventy-five years. During the Civil War he represented "Frank Leslie's Magazine” at the front and after the War was in charge of Leslie's Art Department. ater he formed a partnership with Thomas Hogan and for thirty years these two artists worked together as illustrators. SEARS, CHARLES PAYNE-A, painter, died at Atlantic Highlands, N. J., June 23, 1908. . He was born in New York in 1864, began studying art at fourteen and two years, later, exhibited in the National Academy of Design. SECOR, DAVID PELL.-An artist and art critic, died at Bridgeport, Conn., March 30, 1909, aged eighty-five Fo He was born in Brooklyn, N. Y. He presented to the Stanford University of California the Hervey herborium collection and to the Bridge. *ść Scientific Society a collection of Indian relics. SELINGER, JEAN PAUL.—A figure painter, died at his home in Boston, Sept. 11, 1909. He was, born in that city June 24, 1850; studied at the Lowell Institute in Boston and at the Academy of Finé Arts in Munich under feibei foreceived a silver medal at the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association in 1882 and was awarded the 1,000 prize for the most popular picture in the Osborne Exhibition, New York, 1905. e was a member of the Boston Art Club. SMILLIE, JAMES DAVID, N.A.—An engraver, died at his home in New York, Sept. 14, 19 He was born in that city July 16, 1833, and learned steel engraving from his father, but as a painter was self-taught. He traveled widely in this country painting the Sierras, Adirondacks, Rocky, White and Catskill Mountains. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1868 and an Academician in 1876, the following year becoming a member of the Council and treasurer from 1894 to 1900; he was one of the founders of the American Water Color Society in 1866, was the first treasurer and its president from 1873 to 1878. SMITH, HENRY PERBER.—A landscape painter, died at Asbury Park, N. #. Oct. 16 1907. He was born at Waterford, Conn., Feb. 20, 1854; he was self-taught; traveled extensively in Europe, and had a studio in New York City. He was a member of the American Water Color Society and of the Artists Fund Society. SMITHMEYER, JOHN L., F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in Washington, D. C., March 12, 1908. . He was born in Vienna, Austria; came to this country in 1848, and settled in Chicago where he studied architecture. . He then removed to Indianapolis and after the Civil War was appointed superintendent of the construction of government buildings in the South. e settled in Washington and became associated with Paul J. Pelz, and the designs of this firm were accepted for the Congressional Library in 1873, although the work was not started until 1886. Among other buildings erected by Smithmeyer & Pelz are the Georgetown College at Washington; Carnegie Library, Allegheny, Pa., and the Army and Navy Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1875 and a Fellow in 1886. . He was a member of the Washington Chapter and served three terms as its president. STAIR, MRS. IDA. M.–A sculptor, died at her home in Denver, Colo., March 27, 1908. She was born at Logansport, Ind., Feb. 4, 1857, and was a pupil of Preston Powers, of Chase in New York, and of Taft at the Art Institute of Chicago. She was awarded a medal at the Omaha Exposition in 1898. She was a member of the Artists’ Club of Denver and an instructor at the Art Students Class of the Women's Club in Denver. She modeled statues of Myron Reed and ex-Governor Gilpin for parks in Denver and executed busts of Judge Merrick A. Rogers, John Clark Ridpath

and others. STONE, ALFRED, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at Peterboro, N. H., Sept. 4, 1908. He was born in East Machais, Me, July 29, 1834. . He studied surveying and drawing in the High School at Salem, Mass., and worked in the offices of various architects until in 1859 he entered that of Alpheus C. Morse, of Providence, and in 1864 he opened an office of his own in that city. The firm at the time of his death was Stone, Carpenter and Sheldon. ... Among the buildings designed by Mr. Stone and his associates in Providence are: The County Court House, Public Library, Y. M. C. A. Building, Slater Hall and other buildings of Brown niversity, Exchange Bank, Pendleton Museum and numerous private houses. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1870 and a Fellow in 1896, was its secretary from 1893 to 1898, and served on the Board of Directors until his death. He was an active member of the Rhode Island Chapter, of which he was president at the time of his death. STURGIS, RUSSELL, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in New York, Feb. 11, 1909. He was born in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 16, 1836, was graduated from the College of the o of New York with the degree of A.B. in 1856; in 1870 received the degree of A.M. from Yale, which conferred upon him in 1893 the degree of Ph.D. He studied in architects' offices in New York City and in Munich and practiced in New York from 1863 to 1880. Among the buildings constructed by him were those for Yale University. He was chiefly active, however, as a writer and lecturer on art and was for many years editor of the art department of Scribner's Magazine. Among the books written by him are: “European Architecture, an Historical Study,” “How to Judge Architecture,” “Appreciation of Sculpture,” “Appreciation of Pictures,”, “The Artist's Way of Working,” “The Interdependence of the Arts of Design” (the Scammon course of lectures delivered at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1904), and a “History of Architecture,” the third volume of which has not yet been published. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1865 and was a member of the New York Chapter. He was president of the Architotural League of New York for four terms, was the first president of the Fine Arts Federation of New York and was an honorary member of the National Society of ural Painters and of the National Sculpture Society. TAIT, JOHN ROBINSON.—A landscape painter, died at his home in Baltimore, Md., W; 29, 1909. . He was, born at Cincinnati, O., Jan. 14, 1834; was a pupil of , A. eber in Düsseldorf and of A. Lier and H. Baisch in Munich. He received medals at the Cincinnati Industrial Expositions of 1871 and 1872. He was an honorary member of the Charcoal Club of Baltimore. TALCOTT, ALLEN BUTLER.—A landscape painter, died at Lyme, Conn., June 1, 1908. He was born at Hartford, Conn., April 8, 1867; was graduated. from o College in 1890, and studied art at the Art Students' League in New York and wit Laurens and Benjamin-Constant in Paris. His studio was in New York where he was a member of the Salmagundi Club. He was an exhibitor at the regular annual exhibitions and received a silver medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, 1904. THARP, NEWTON J.—An architect, died in New York City, May 12, 1909. He was born at Mount Pleasant, Ia., July 28, 1867, and with his parents moved to California in 1874. He spent four years at the San Francisco School of Design and in 1896 he went to Europe to study. At the time of his death he was City Architect of San Francisco and among the public buildings designed by him in this capacity are the Hall of Justice, the Infirmary and a group of hospital ão. TIFF ANY, WILLIAM SHAW-A painter, died at his home in New York, Sept. 28, 1907, at the age of eighty-three years. He was graduated from Harvard University in 1845; studied in Paris under Ary Sheffer, Couture, Troy on and Benjamin-Constant. He was a friend of William Morris Hunt. Returning to America in 1854 he settled in Baltimore. His “St. Christopher Bearing the Christ Child” is in Memorial Hall

at Harvard. TREGO, WILLIAM T.—A figure painter, died at his home North Wales, Pa., June 24, 1 He was born at Yardley, Bucks Co., Pa., in 1859, and studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, later going to Paris for three years. He had a picture in the Salon of 1888 and after his return to America his work was seen at the annual exhibitions. He was awarded the Tappan prize at the Pennsylvania Academy. ULRICH, CHARLES FREDERIC, A.N.A.—Died in Berlin, Germany, May 15, 1908. He was born in New York City, Oct. 18, 1858, and studied at the National Academy of Design in New York and with Loefftz and Lindenschmidt in Munich. In 1884 he was the first recipient of the Clarke prize at the National Academy of Design, and this picture, “The Land of Promise,” now belongs to the National Gallery of Art at Washington, D. C.; he received a $2,500 prize from the American Art Association New York, in 1886; honorable mention at the Paris Exposition of 1889, and a mosai at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. He was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in 1883 and was a member of the Salmagundi Club. His painting, “The Glass Blowers of Murano,” is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The last few years of his life were spent in Europe. VONNEGUT, BERNARD, F.A.I.A.—An architect, died at his home in Indianapolis, Aug. 7, 1908, having been born in that city Aug. 8, 1855. He took the course in architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and later studied at the Polytechnic Institute of Hanover, Germany. On his return he entered the office of George B. Post in New York and a few yeo later went back to Indianapolis, where, in 1888, he formed a partnership with Arthur Bohn under the firm name of Vonnegut & Bohn. Among the important buildings erected by this firm are: The Herron Art Institute, the Ayres Building, Students Building of Indiana University, Delaware Street Temple, Shortridge High School, Federal Building at Vincennes and many residences and business buildings in Indianapolis. He was elected a member of the Western Association of Architects in 1886 and, by act of consolidation with the American Institute of Architects, became a Fellow of the Institute in 1889. He was also a member of the Architectural League of America. WALLINGFORD, C. A., F.A.I.A.—An architect, died in the summer of 1909 at Indianapolis, Ind. He was born in St. Louis, Mo., Feb. 3, 1854; was graduated from the aval Academy at Annapolis and then took up the study of architecture in the office of Edwin May in Indianapolis, in which city he later, opened his own office. . He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1882 and was also a member of the Indianapolis Architects' Association. WIKSTROM, BROR ANDERS.—A painter, died in New York, April 27, 1909. He was born at Stora Lassana, Sweden, about seventy years ago, and was a pupil of the Academy of Stockholm and of Edward Perseus. is home was in New §. where, for about thirty-five years, he had designed the majority of the floats used in the Mardi Gras Carnivals. He had been engaged by the Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commission to design the floats for the historical and carnival parades and had finished about fifty of these at the time of his death.

WINSLOW, WALTER THATCHER, A.A.I.A.—An architect, died Jan. 31, 1909. . He was born in Cambridge, Mass., Feb. 13, 1843; was educated at a private school near Boston and then entered the office of the Boston architect, J. N. Bradlee. At the time of his death he was a member of the firm of Winslow & Bigelow. Among the prominent buildings with which he was identified are the Tremont Building, Hotel Touraine, Board of Trade. Building and the Hen Siegel department store. He was elected an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1901.

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