Immagini della pagina
PDF
ePub

XXXXX

In accord with the REGENTS' LATEST REQUIREMENTS

THE MODERN ENGLISH COURSE, Two Books
By HENRY P. EMERSON, Superintendent of Education, Buffalo, New York, and

IDA C. BENDER, Supervisor of Primary Grades, Buffalo, New York.
A Complete Course for the Grades. These books are the work of authors who

know thoroughly the needs of the New York Schools and have kept them constantly in mind. Both Composition Work and Technical Grammar are provided for with a fine sense of proportion.

CHANNING'S HISTORIES First Lessons in United States History. Designed especially for the Sixth Year. A Short History of the United States. For the Grammar Grades. A Student's History of the United States. For the More Advanced High School

Classes.

SOURCE READERS IN AMERICAN HISTORY Selected and Annotated by Albert Bushnell Hart, Professor of History in

Harvard University. No. 1. Colonial Children.

No. 2. Camps and Firesides of the Revolution. No. 3. How Our Grandfathers Lived. No. 4. The Romance of the Civil War.

The best collection of source material from American History for the Grades, in existence. Adapted for pupils of the Intermediate and Grammar Grades. Each volume is appropriately illustrated.

TARR AND MCMURRY'S GEOGRAPHIES A thoroughly modern and carefully graded series, covering all grades in which

geography is taught.

FOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES
BOTSFORD'S ANCIENT HISTORY FOR BEGINNERS.
COMAN AND KENDALL'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.

TARR'S NEW. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

64-66 Fifth Avenue, New York CHICAGO BOSTON, ATLANTA SAN FRANCISCO XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

THE SEARCH-LIGHT

THROWN ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE WORLD

W

“Your paper is what everyone has more or less consciously been waiting for and wanting—a vitascope of the world of civilization as it grows before our eyes. Whatever other periodicals one may read, no one, I should suppose, could afford to do without yours.'

Julian Hawthorne. A sample copy, to be had for the asking, will explain Mr. Hawthorne's enthusiasm. AN ILLUSTRATED NEWS WEEKLY

The SEARCH-LIGHT puts its readers in touch with all of importance that is going on in

this world-home of ours. It presents the clean news, winnowed of chaff-condensed, but not squeezed dry. Its pages form a living chronicle of human progress, the events standing out in vivid relief as the search-light is turned from point to point, over all phases of human interest.

A Unique Index

But in every case, and PRICE 5 CENTS October 28, 1905 $2.00 A YEAR this is the point of A continuous index

superiority THE

over - a real index, not a

all

other similar publicamere list of titles,

tions, the reader gets brought up to date in

(instead of unrelated each issue, makes in

fragments) a comstant reference possi

plete and continuous ble, and coordinates

digest of the news and the news in each de

a survey of the partment so that

world's progress in TEACHERS and

that particular field. study clubs can follow current events readily and intelli

A Time Saver gently.

The complexity of The Department

modern life makes Method

such a classification

both a luxury and a All the news is clas

necessity to those sified into sixty de

whose profession or partments, some ap

position in society re

CONDENSEO WELRY OF THE pearing every week,

quires them to keep others less frequently,

well-informed and according to their rel

whose time is too preative importance.

cious to be wasted. FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

The ease with which, under this systematic treatment, it is possible to acquire a broad and comprehensive knowledge of our own times makes THE SEARCH-Light invaluable also to the young people in school and college, who need above all things to learn to understand the real tendencies of the world in the work of which they are soon to take an active part. IN A NUT SHELL It is the paper you need for yourself and your family, as you will realize if you heed the

MORAL: SUBSCRIBE TO-DAY Published weekly at $2.00 a year. To schools in clubs of ten or more $1.50. At the newstands 5 cents a copy.

SPECIAL CLUBBING OFFERS. List sent on application. This is a sample: THE SEARCH-Light, Review of Reviews, Cosmopolitan and American Education, one year, $3.50, just half the regular price.

[graphic]

The Search-Light Publishing Co., 24-20 Murray St.

Modern Language Text-Books

THE INTERNATIONAL MODERN LANGUAGE SERIES

Ninety volumes presenting, in convenient form, the best works of modern foreign literature.

À price list of the books in the series will be sent, postpaid, to any address on request. ALDRICH AND FOSTER'S FOUNDATIONS OF FRENCH

A valuable book for beginners in secondary schools or in the freshman year at college. In the method of presentation practical class-room consid

erations have everywhere been kept uppermost. DUERR'S ESSENTIALS OF GERMAN GRAMMAR

"Essentials of German Grammar" is intended for use in secondary schools. It has been written in the hope of doing away with superfluous memorizing, and of developing instead the few great principles which are in

constant evidence in German accidence and syntax. COLLAR'S FIRST YEAR GERMAN

The aim of this book is to lay out in orderly progression for beginners having not less than four lessons a week, one year's work in speaking, reading and writing German.

GINN & COMPANY el Publishers

BOSTON

NEW YORK

CHICAGO

LONDON

| Text Books of Art Education

The Seventh Year Book Now Ready

Combined pencil and color effects, printed on tinted paper, are one of the distinctive features of this attractive and helpful book. Increased attention has been given to Geometric Problems and Industrial Drawing, and more definite study to the

NATION AND STATE
By GEORGE M. PHILIPS, Ph. D.

-JUST PUBLISHED-
fContains just enough mat-
ter to have it teachable.
Clear and definite. : : :

TRASKS
SCHOOL GYMNASTICS

By HARRIET E. TRASK
Graduate of the Boston School of

Gymnastics
(The only thoroughly grad-
ed and orderly book of teach-
able size for regular school

use. : : : : : : : : CHRISTOPHER SOWER CO.,

PUBLISHERS 614 ARCH ST., PHILADELPHIA.

Principles of
Perspective and Design
Book Seven has 126 pages, 16 of which con-

tain beautiful color reproductions. The
text explains how to work out the given
lessons, and sets forth principles to be
studied. It is accompanied by

Two Hundred Illustrations in black and white, including decorative treatment of landscapes, trees, plapt-forms, and still-life forms. There are also many reproductions from famous masterpieces.

Sample Copies, postpaid, 56c.
THE PRANG EDUCATIONAL CO.

New York Atlanta Chicago

A STRONG SERIES

ESSENTIALS IN HISTORY
Edited by Albert Bushnell Hart, LL. D., Professor of History,

Harvard University.

JUST PUBLISHED

ESSENTIALS IN MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN HISTORY By Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History,

Indiana University

$1.50 This work begins with a survey of the world from the fall of the Western Empire to the year 800. From the latter date there is given an account of the development of the various important countries which have influenced the progress of civilization. The author emphasizes the fact that mediæval civilization includes some of the great principles of ancient government, especially the tenacious concept of a world empire. At the very outset Professor Harding attacks and solves what are, for young people, the three most difficult problems in mediæval history -- the feudal state, the church, and the rivalry between the empire and the church. The maps and illustrations are particularly noteworthy. Not only are they numerous, but they have been prepared and collected with unusual care.

PREVIOUSLY ISSUED

ESSENTIALS IN ANCIENT HISTORY
By Arthur M. Wolfson, Ph. D., First Assistant in History,
De Witt Clinton High School, New York.

$1.50

ESSENTIALS IN ENGLISH HISTORY By Albert Perry Walker, A. M., Master in History, English High School,

Boston, Mass.

$1.50

ESSENTIALS IN AMERICAN HISTORY By Albert Bushnell Hart, LL D., Professor of History, Harvard University

$1.50

[blocks in formation]

FROM KINDERGARTEN TO COLLEGE

Vol. IX.

JANUARY, 1906

No. 5

IMAGINATION IN EDUCATION CARL HOLLIDAY, M. A., PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH, ALABAMA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL As one looks back through history it to educate himself—the purposeful train

would seem that the chief purpose ing of the purely mental man. But, with of education has ever been and continues to the beginning of the Christian era, it was be the preservation of man's normal con- seen that the moral man was degenerating, dition. By this I mean to say that the and history strongly substantiated this conscious or unconscious effort has been view as taken by the early fathers of the at all times to develop the human faculties church. Men were indeed lifted mentally in just such proportions as are best for from barbarism ; the culture of the moment inan's earthly and eternal welfare. Not had not been equalled by that of any prethat the exact proportion has ever been at vious stage of the world's growth; architained ; but the trend has in every age been tecture had made Greece and Rome cenin such a direction.

ters of majestic beauty; sculpture reached Thus, doubtless, the first great epoch in an excellence unsurpassed to this day; the purposeful education of man concerned literature had touched the ideal. And, yet, itself with his mental development, and amid all this mental perfection, the wickedthat alone. In those early days he prob- ness of Rome rose as a stench unto Heaven. ably was a creature more of instinct than Licentiousness, debauchery reveled in halls of reason. His body needed but little at- of grandeur; corruption throttled public tention; the earthly in him was too strong and private life; the empire, strong it as it was. The up-lifting of the mental seemed, as the eternal hills, was even then, man was the all-in-all. Of course, previous because of the rottenness of its individual to the Christian era, there was a certain members, tottering before its eternal downamount of intentional moral training, but, fall. with the exception of the Hebrew race, Then it was that the doctrine of the man no highly civilized people of the ancient Jesus was spread abroad: To know God days made it the predominant trait of man's is wisdom. The trend of educational endevelopment. Hence, the cultivated Greek deavors began to change. Through the era became a philosopher, who, if not indeed of the first Christian centuries with its conan unbeliever in all religion, at least reached secrated saints and self-torturing hermits, his religious conclusions, not through emo- on through the Dark Ages with their tions or belief in inspiration, but through church monarchy, on into the beginning processes of subtle reasoning. So it was of the Renaisance, the education of the with the cultured Roman who, giving up moral man gradually lifted itself above the his manifold gods, fell back upon the ad- merely mental. Then it was that the whole mirable mental powers which were his and world began to think upon religion. Marbelieved in no divinity.

tin Luther made the German universities Such, then, I should say, was the first a seething crater of theological strifes ; Oxnotable step in man's conscious endeavors ford and Cambridge became more like

« IndietroContinua »