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Belles-Lettres and Classical.

Temptation and Triumph, with other Stories. By VIRGINIA F. Town

SEND. 12mo., pp. 389. Cincinnati: Poe & Hitchcock. 1863. This book belongs to the class in which the realities of life have crowded all interest from our individual mind, and which we usually huddle into our “miscellaneous” list of titles. But for those who feel the “aching void” for fiction, and desire, that it may be supplied with aliment that will healthfully nourish the inner man, we recommend this as the right book, on the authority of the source from which it issues.

Periodicals.

The British American. A Monthly Magazine, devoted to Literature, Science, and Art. No. 7. Nov. 1863, 8vo., pp. 112. Toronto: Rollo & Adam.

We welcome to our Table every token that our Canadian brethren are prosecuting a career of intellectual advancement. Whatever our geographical boundary lines or political separations are, both belong to the REPUBLIC of Letters. It is of the very nature of a true democratic spirit to make any allowance for differences of positions and views; nor do we the less desire the prosperity of our Provincial neighbors because we prefer a President and they cherish a spirit of loyalty toward the noble Lady who now adorns with every womanly virtue the British throne. When the Prince of Wales rode up our Broadway, that street was spanned with the banner, “We honor the Mother and we welcome the Son.” Never was a public tribute more spontaneous, less gotten wp, than that ovation through our free states. Twice on our continent was the Prince insulted; once in Canada, and once, the moment he trod slave soil, in the streets of Richmond. How little did the American heart expect or realize that in a few short months, in response to all this, the British government would do all it dare against us and for the rebellious Confederacy of Richmond, and how madly the British press would open upon us its floodgates of insolence and calumny. To all this we have presented our Monitors and our defiance; we owe the moderation of these later days not to English justice or honor but to English discretion. They would but they dare not, and America will scarce forget it this half century. Yet we recognize the fact that the humble people are on our side. We shall not forget the heroism of the suffering artisans of Lancashire; we cherish the belief that the motherly heart of the British queen never has forgotten how

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once these free states poured forth their love and honor on her
son; and we yet hold fast the story that the hand of the dying
Albert employed its failing energy in softening the words of the
demand for reparation in the case of the Trent.
Our Canadian brother is of course very silly when he touches
upon our affairs. He is greatly in fear that we shall lose our lib-
erties. He considers us cursed with a “bridled press, a suspended
habeas corpus, a threatened military despotism " He may set his
heart at ease. At the approaching close of Mr. Lincoln's term of
office another presidential election will reinstate him, or supply a
successor in his office, as our free Republic pleases. All the
machinery of our Republican government will go on. Our free
institutions will be just as intact as though no army had
been raised and no habeas corpus suspended. His hopes
or fears that our liberties will be impaired or our institu-
tions unsettled, are as rational as some lunatic's panic lest the keel
of the Great Eastern should cut the Atlantic in two and let the
water out. The only institution that will disappear, if any, will
be Slavery, and that will leave us a higher, purer freedom, and a
perfected Union. The South will then commence her manufac-
tures, and both sections will be unanimous for a tariff that will
probably leave England the chance of being the consumer of our
manufactures provided she be not too poor to buy. The hero-arti-
sans of Lancashire we hope to import to a more congenial clime.
Besides some lighter literature the British American has an
entertaining semi-scientific article on “Frogs and their Kin,” and
a valuable article by the editor, II. Y. Hind, on the Fisheries of
the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador, and Newfoundland. The
book notices are mostly of our Free State publications. Of Cana-
dian periodicals are noticed “Transactions of the Literary and
Historical Society of Quebec,” and “the Canadian Naturalist and
Geologists.” The latter contains an article on “The Air-breathers
of the Coal Period,” by Dr. Dawson, the able author of Archaia.

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An Outline of the Elements of the English Language, for the Use of Students. By N. G. CLARK, Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in Union College. 12mo., pp. 220. New York: C. Scribner. 1863.

This little volume is not, as the title might seem to indicate, a grammar, but more properly a history of the English language. As such it is a valuable manual, written in a graceful style and ample mastery of the subject.

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The Every-Day Philosopher in Town and Country. By the author of “The Recreations of a Country Parson.” 12mo., pp. 320. Boston: Ticknor & Fields. 1863.

The Graver Thoughts of a Country Parson. By the author of “The Recreations of a Country Parson.” 12mo., pp. 307. Boston: Ticknor & Fields. 1863.

Our old friend after ruralizing a while drew near to town, and after philosophizing through a long series of efforts at last preaches. That he is truly serious and in earnest in this last performance need not be doubted. If heretofore he has appeared secular and worldly-wise, yet let it be remembered he never once denied or doffed his gown. He told you at start that he was a “parson;” that though out of his pulpit and out of his homiletics, he was not out of his sacred calling. It was indeed week-day and not Sunday; and he talked matters of prudential morality rather than of religion. But the thoughts of diviner strain that take hold of eternity, of Christ and redemption, are but held in reserve.

The “Graver Thoughts” are sermons. They are in much the same pure, mellow, flowing style with the essays. They are not mere ethical lectures like the sermons of Blair. They contain searching appeals to the conscience, and explicit presentations of Christ as the atoning Saviour. “Many of these words,” he tells us, “have been said to a little handful of kindly country people, and all of them to a large congregation of educated folk in a great city.”

Daily Walk with Wise Men; or, Religious Exercises for Every Day in the Year. Selected, arranged, and adapted by Rev. NATHAN HEAD. 12mo, pp. 782. New York: Harper & Brothers. 1861.

This is a book of devout readings for every day in the year, selected from Augustine, Calvin, Leighton, Chrysostom, Davenant, and a few others.

Man's Gift to God. A Discourse by ADoLPHE MONoD. Translated from the French by a Lady. 18mo., pp. 43. New York: Carlton & Porter. 1863.

About the most beautiful uninspired sermon we ever read: searching, philosophical, evangelical, and eloquent. It should have been done up in purple and gold.

Woman and her Saviour in Persia. By a Returned Missionary. With five Illustrations and a Map of the Nestorian Country. 12mo., pp. 308. Boston: Gould & Lincoln. 1863.

A gem in Missionary literature.

Chrestomathie Francaise, a French Reading Book, containing, 1. Selections
from the best French Writers with References to the Author's French
Grammar. , 2. The Masterpieces of Molieu, Racine, Boileau, and Wol-
taire. With Explanatory Notices and a Vocabulary. By WILLIAM J.
KNAPP, A.M., Professor of Modern Languages and Literature in Madison
University. 12mo., pp. 480. New York: Harper & Brothers. 1863.
The Ring of Amasis. From the Papers of a German Physician. By
RoBERT BULWER LYTTON. (“Owen Mercdith.”) 12mo., pp. 301. New
York: Harper & Brothers. 1863.
Peter Carradine ; or, the Martindale Pastoral. By CARoll NE CHESEBRo.
12mo., pp. 398. New York: Sheldon & Co. Boston : Gould & Lin-
coln. 1863.
The Mill Agent. By the author of “Opposite the Jail." 12mo, pp. 352.
Boston: Graves & Young. New York: Sheldon & Co. Cincinnati:
George S. Blanchard. 1864.
History of the Sioux War and Massacres of 1862 and 1863. By Is AAC V.
D. HEARD. With Portraits and Illustrations. 12mo., pp. 354. New
York: Harper & Brothers. 1863. -
The Yankee Boy at Home. 12mo., pp. 294. New York: James Miller,
(successor to C. S. Francis & Co.) 1864.
Broken Columns. 12mo., pp. 558. New York: Sheldon & Co. 1863.

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Notices of several books and pamphlets have been omitted or postponed for want of space.

--> Plan of Episcopal Visitation for February, March, and April, 1864.

Conference. Place. Time. IBishop. KENTUCKY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Augusta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 25*... SIMPson. BALTIMORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wesley Chapel, Washington. March 2 ... Scott. East BALTIMORE . . . . . . . . . Altoona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44. 2 ... JANEs. NEw JERSEY. . . . . . . . . . . . . Bridgeton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ** 2 ... St MPson. Missouri AND ARKANSAs... Jefferson City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 2 ... BAKER. PHILADELPHIA . . . . . . . . . . . Wilmington, Del............ {-k 9 ... AMEs. KANSAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leavenworth ............... t{ 10*... BAKER. NEwARK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Market-street, Paterson ..... i.. 16 ... SIMPson. PittsburgH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barnesville, Ohio ........... ** 16 ... Scott. WestERN VIRGINA....... Parkersburgh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . &t. 16 ... MoRRIs. PRoviDENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . New London, Conn......... ** 23 ... AMEs. WYOMING ... . . . . . . . . . . . . Waverly, N. Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * 23 ... JANEs. NEBRASKA ............... Omaha City................. {{ 24*... BAKER. NEw ENGLAND... . . . . . . . . Walnut-street, Chelsea...... tk 30 ... AMEs. TRoy ................... Amsterdam................. * * 30, ... SIMPson. NEw HAMPSHIRE. . . . . . . . . Lebanon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 6 ... JANEs. ONEIDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Norwich.................... ** 6 . . . Scott. North INDIANA. . . . . . . . . . Knightstown ............... 4. 6 . . . MoRRIs. NEw York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Newburgh.................. go 13 ... AMEs. NEw York EAst . . . . . . . . . Hartford.................... to 13 ... SIMPson. BLACK River............ Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to 13 ... BAKER. VERMonT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Johnsbury .............. {{ 13 ... JANEs. MAINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wesley Church, Bath ....... ** 14*... Scott.

* Thursday.

THE

METHODIST QUARTERLY REVIEW.

A PRIL, 1864.

ART. I. — MORAL PHILOSOPHY OF WATSON'S INSTITUTES.

[SECOND ARTICLE.]

MoRAL PHILOSOPHY we have already ventured to define as the Science of the Moral Law, and of the nature of man as the subject of moral law. In so doing we are claiming for the science a wider range than is usually assigned by ethical writers. Dr. Mahan, in his small but valuable work on Moral Philosophy, excludes from this field all questions as to the nature of man, remitting them to the department of pure psychology. “It belongs to the intellectual philosopher rather than to the moral philosopher to determine whether the elements necessary to moral agency exist in man.” Inasmuch, however, as a fundamental position of the doctor's philosophy, and, as we believe, of any true philosophy of morals is that moral law eacists in man, not only objectively, but subjectively—his reason imposing rules for the government of his conduct so that “he is a law unto himself” —and inasmuch as this fundamental truth is denied by the sensational school, its consideration is demanded in a complete treatise of moral philosophy. We think, also, that such a treatise would be essentially defective if it did not discuss, not merely the question, “What are the elements of moral agency?” but also “Do the constituents of accountability exist in man?” A true philosophy of morals must be grounded upon a true * “Moral Philosophy,” pp. 21, 22. FourTH SERIES, Vol. XVI.-12

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