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a Copious Index. By William HONE.

IX. HARVARD UNIVERSITY

216

Letter to Governor Lincoln in relation to Harvard

University. By F. C. Gray. Second Edition,

with an Appendix.

X. LIFE AND CHARACTER OF HENRY BROUGHAM 227

1. Speech of Henry Brougham, Esq. M. P. on

the Present State of the Law.

2. Practical Observations on Popular Education.

By H. BROUGHAM, Esq. M. P. F. R. S.

3. Publications of the Society for the Diffusion

of Useful Knowledge.

XI. NORTH-EASTERN AND NORTHERN BOUNDARY 262

1. Decision of His Majesty the King of the

Netherlands, on the Questions submitted to him

by the Governments of the United States and Great

Britain, for determining the Boundary Line be-

tween the United States and the British Provinces.

2. Protest of the Envoy Extraordinary and Min-

ister Plenipotentiary of the United States, against

the Decision of the King of the Netherlands, on

the Questions submitted to him, as Arbiter between

the United States and Great Britain, relative to the

Boundary of the United States.

3. Report of a Joint Committee of the Legislature

of the State of Maine, on the answer made by the

King of the Netherlands, in relation to the North-

eastern Boundary of the United States ; read and

accepted by both branches of the Legislature.

2. Message from the President of the United

States in compliance with a Resolution of the

Senate, relative to the execution of the Act of

March 30, 1802, to regulate Trade and Inter-

course with the Indian Tribes, and to preserve

Peace on the Frontiers, transmitted to the Senate

on the 22d of February, 1831.

VII. THE PROSPECT OF REFORM IN EUROPE

154

L'Avenir. Par M. J. L. de SISMONDI. Extrait

de la Revue Encyclopedique.

VIII. POPULAR SPORTS AND Festivals

191

The Sports and Pastimes of the People of Eng.

land. By Joseph STRUTT. A New Edition, with

a Copious Index. By William Hone.

IX. HARVARD UNIVERSITY

216

Letter to Governor Lincoln in relation to Harvard

University. By F. C. Gray. Second Edition,

with an Appendix.

X. LIFE AND CHARACTER OF Henry Brougham 227

1. Speech of Henry Brougham, Esq. M. P. on

the Present State of the Law.

2. Practical Observations on Popular Education.

By H. BROUGHAM, Esq. M. P. F. R. S.

3. Publications of the Society for the Diffusion

of Useful Knowledge.

XI. NORTH-EASTERN AND Northern BOUNDARY .. 262

1. Decision of His Majesty the King of the

Netherlands, on the Questions submitted to him

by the Governments of the United States and Great

Britain, for determining the Boundary Line be.

tween the United States and the British Provinces.

2. Protest of the Envoy Extraordinary and Min-

ister Plenipotentiary of the United States, against

the Decision of the King of the Netherlands, on

the Questions submitted to him, as Arbiter between

the United States and Great Britain, relative to the

Boundary of the United States.

3. Report of a Joint Committee of the Legislature

of the State of Maine, on the answer made by the

ART.

Page.

I. AMERICAN Poets

297

The American Common-Place Book of Poetry, with

Occasional Notes. By GEORGE B. CHEEVER.

II. ANGLO-Saxon LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

325

1. A Grammar of the Anglo-Saxon Tongue, with

a Praxis. By Erasmus Rask, Professor of Literary

History in, and Librarian to, the University of Co-

penhagen. A new Edition, enlarged and improved

by the Author. Translated from the Danish. By

B. THORPE, Honorary Member of the Icelandic Lit-

erary Society, &c.

2. Illustrations of Anglo-Saxon Poetry. By JOHN

Josias ('ONY BEARE, M. A. &c. Professor of Anglo-

Saxon and of Poetry in the University of Oxford.

Edited with additional Notes, &c. By his Brother,

William DANIEL CONYBEARE.

III. Life of HENRY CLAY.

351

Biography of Henry Clay. By GEORGE D. PREN-

TICE, Esq.

IV. MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY

397

Report of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society

upon the establishment of an Experimental Garden

and Rural Cemetery.

V. INDIAN BIOGRAPHY

107

The Fall of the Indian, with other Poems. By

Isaac McLELLAN, Jr.

King of the Netherlands, in relation to the North-
eastern Boundary of the United States ; read and
accepted by both branches of the Legislature.

by Jared SPARKS.

VII. Stewart's VOYAGE TO THE SOUTH SEA

484

A Visit to the South Seas in the United States'

Ship Vincennes, during the Years 1829 and 1830,

with Scenes in Brazil, Peru, Manilla, the Cape of

Good Hope, and St. Helena. By C. S. STEWART,

A. M. Chaplain, in the United States' Navy, and

Author of ' A Residence in the Sandwich Islands in

1823 and 1825.'

VIII. ExhibitiON OF PICTURES AT THE ATHENÆUM Gal-

506

Remarks upon the Atheneum Gallery of Paint-

ings for 1831.

IX. AMERICAN LIBRARY OF USEFUL KNOWLEDGE

515

American Library of Useful Knowledge, published

by authority of the Boston Society for the Diffusion

of Useful Knowledge.

LERY

NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. LXXII.

JULY, 1831.

ART. I.The Laws of Population and Wages.

1. Two Lectures on Population, delivered before the University of Oxford in Easter Term, 1828. By NASSAU William SENIOR, late Fellow of Magdalen College, A. M., Professor of Political Economy. To which is added, a Correspondence between its Author and the Rev. T. R. Malthus. Svo. pp. 90. London. 1828. . 2. Three Lectures on the Rate of Wages, delivered before the University of Oxford in Easter Term, 1830; with a Preface on the Causes and Remedies of the present Disturbances. By the same. 8vo. pp. 62. London. 1830. 3. Three Lectures on the Cost of obtaining Money, and on some Effects of Private and Government Paper Money, delivered before the University of Oxford in Trinity Term, 1829. By the same. 8vo. pp. 103. London. 1830. The author of these works appears before the public under the imposing character of Professor of Political Economy in the University of Oxford. This Prosessorship is a recent establishment. It was founded by the munificence of a private gentleman, Henry Drummond, Esq., upon a plan, as far as we are informed, before untried. The Professor is appointed for five years, and is bound by the charter to publish annually one or more of his lectures. He is not eligible for a second terin. One object of this arrangement is understood to be that of obtaining successively from the same chair, a developement of the different, and in some respects contradictory theories,

VOL. XXXIII.-NO. 72. 1

which prevail in different circles respecting some of the leading points in the science. It was also probably supposed, that, as the acceptance of a Professorship of this description would not

a be understood to involve an abandonment of other pursuits, a competent person might be secured at less expense than would be necessary on the usual system. Without inquiring at present whether the new plan be or be not on the whole an improvement, we have no hesitation in saying, that we know of no way in which the required amount of funds could have been employed with better effect for the advancement of knowledge, and the permanent satisfaction and reputation of their owner, than in founding this Professorship. We cannot but hope that the example may serve as a guide to the liberality of some of the munificent patrons of learning in this quarter of the Union, where there is yet no establishment devoted exclusively to instruction in this most important subject.

Mr. Senior, the first Professor on the foundation of Mr. Drummond, and whose term of service has, we believe, already expired, appears to have exhibited an industry and zeal in the discharge of his duties, which is creditable to himself, and may be thought to afford a favorable comment on the results of the new plan. His labors, though conducted with a laudable spirit, do not, however, strike us as of any great importance to the science; but as they have attracted some attention in this country, and have even been republished in extenso in some of our best newspapers, it

may

be

proper to give them a passing notice. We shall take the different works in the order in which they were published, and first, the Two Lectures on Population.

The causes that regulate the state of population and the effects that result from its increase and diminution, have been for many years past regarded, and with justice, as among the most interesting questions in political economy. The objections to the theory of Malthus on this subject have been repeatedly stated in this journal, and we have, on the same occasions, submitted to the consideration of our readers, what we consider as a more correct opinion.* The principles of Malthus were never, we believe, very generally adopted in this

* See our reviews of A. H. Everett's work on Population, Vol. XVII. p. 288; of McCulloch's Political Economy, Vo XXV. p. 112; and of Phillips's Manual of Political Economy, Vol. XXXII. p. 215.

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