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SPECIMENS

OF

ROMAN LITERATURE.

COMPANION VOLUME.

Second Edition.

A HISTORY F ROMAN LITERATURE: :

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE TIMES OF THE ANTOXINES.

BY

CHARLES THOMAS CRUTTWELL, M.A.,
FELLOW OF MERTON COLLEGE, OXFORD; HEAD MASTER OF BRADFIELD COLLEGE.

Crown 8vo, cloth, 88. 6d. "Mr. CRUTTWELL has done a real service to all Students of the Latin Language and Literature. ... Full of good scholarship and good criticism."—Athenæum.

"A most serviceable-indeed, indispensable-guide for the Student. The general reader' will be both charmed and instructed."-Saturday Revieto.

LONDON: CHARLES GRIFFIN AND COMPANY.

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THE WORKS OF LATIN AUTHORS (PROSE WRITERS AND POETS) FROM THE

EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE TIMES OF THE ANTONINES.

FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS.

EDITED BY

CHARLES THOMAS CRUTTWELL, M.A.,

FELLOW OF MERTOX COLLEGE, OXFORD; HEAD MASTER OF BRADFIELD COLLEGE ;

AND

PEAKE BANTON, B.A.,
SOMETIME SCHOLAR OF JESUS COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE; AND

COMPOSITION MASTER AT BRADFIELD COLLEGE,

LONDON:
CHARLES GRIFFIN AND COMPANY,

STATIONERS' HALL COURT.

All Rights Reserved.

PREFACE.

The present volume was undertaken at the request of several eminent Teachers, who had used the History of Roman Literature with their higher classes, and desired some companion volume of reference for passages which should illustrate the critical or exegetical remarks contained in that work. The Editors hope that the present selection containing over 900 representative passages of all styles and all ages) will be found useful for this purpose. It will also serve for Exercises in Unprepared Translation, a feature of school-work the importance of which is now fully recognised; as well as supply models for Composition, and a storehouse of Passages to be learnt by heart. The complete Index to the Specimens, and the Chronological Table of Authors, will, it is hoped, facilitate the employment of the book for all these objects.

The work consists of two divisions, the first embodying the main results of Roman thought on the three great subjects of Religion, Philosophy and Science, and Art and Letters; the second containing numerous examples of the Styles adopted by the best masters of the language.

In the former part it has been the Editors' aim, so far as possible, to confine themselves to what was genuinely Roman,* which may explain the omission of several well-known passages, and the insertion of others that make no pretension to literary merit. In the latter part, the more illustrious and familiar authors have not been drawn upon to an extent at all corre* Lucretius forms an unavoidable exception.

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