The Great War in Russian Memory

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Indiana University Press, 14 lug 2011 - 408 pagine
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Karen Petrone shatters the notion that World War I was a forgotten war in the Soviet Union. Although never officially commemorated, the Great War was the subject of a lively discourse about religion, heroism, violence, and patriotism during the interwar period. Using memoirs, literature, films, military histories, and archival materials, Petrone reconstructs Soviet ideas regarding the motivations for fighting, the justification for killing, the nature of the enemy, and the qualities of a hero. She reveals how some of these ideas undermined Soviet notions of military honor and patriotism while others reinforced them. As the political culture changed and war with Germany loomed during the Stalinist 1930s, internationalist voices were silenced and a nationalist view of Russian military heroism and patriotism prevailed.

 

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Indice

1 Introduction The Great War in Russian Memory
1
2 Spirituality the Supernatural and the Memory of World War I
31
3 The Paradoxes of Gender in Soviet War Memory
75
4 Violence Morality and the Conscience of the Warrior
127
5 World War I and the Definition of Russianness
165
6 Arrested History
199
7 Disappearance and Reappearance
246
8 Legacies of the Great War
282
Notes
301
Bibliography
339
Index
359
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Informazioni sull'autore (2011)

Karen Petrone is Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky. She is author of Life Has Become More Joyous, Comrades: Celebrations in the Time of Stalin (IUP, 2000) and editor (with Valerie Kivelson, Michael S. Flier, and Nancy Shields Kollmann) of The New Muscovite Cultural History: A Collection in Honor of Daniel B. Rowland.

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