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Copyright 1921 New York Education Co.
Entered as second class mail matter in the Post Office at Albany, N. Y.

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Hotel Continental
Broadway at 41st Street

When You Visit Buffalo New York City or Niagara Falls

.\dd to your pleasure and com

in the Heart of the City

sort by stopping at the Lenox. A Modern. Up-to-Date High Class Hotel
(Juietly situated, vet very con- Five minutes from the Pennsylvania and
". . . . . . . - , , o ator (;rand Central Terminals, within easy access
venient to busin, ss, theater and of the retail shopping district and sur-
shopping districts. rounded by forty theaters.
European plan. Fireproof, modern. Ex- - -
ck ptional cuisine. Every room an outside 3OO Outside Rooms

room. From $2.50 per day up.

Each with private bath Bool. 1, ts, rates and full in formation on request. –––.

(". A. M IN ER, Managing Director - - - ... "
North Street at I), laware Ave. RATES-Single, $2.50 per Day Upward

I3uffalo, N. Y. Double. $5.00 Upward
HOTEL LENOX Comfort of our guests our first consideration

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18 Y
Horatio M. Pollock, M. S., Ph. D.
Auth, or of the American Examination and Review Book and Editor of American 2
Education

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The Examination Book in American History and Civics contains five hundred Regents' Questions with answers in American History and Civics and the biographies of one hundred leading Americans and other valuable material. such as important dates and associated events. The questions. with answers are arranged chronologically and cover the entire history of the United States from the period of discovery to the present time. Every period is fully treated. The answers are authentic and complete.

This volume will be found of great help to teachers for review purposes and to pupils who are preparing for examinations.

Cloth Bound, Price Postpaid, 6o Cents
The Book and American Education for one year, $1.85

New York Education Co., Albany, N. Y. .

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Issued the tenth day of every month except July and August Owned and Published by THE NEW YORK EDUCATION CO., 50 State St., Albany, N. Y.

HORATIO M. POLLOCK
CHARLES W. BLESSING

GEORGE S. PAINTER
JOHN L. WARNER

| Associate

| Editors | Editors

ADVISORY BOARD OF EDITORS

PRESIDENT A. R. BRUBACHER, PH. D., NEw York STATE College For TEACHERs
PRESIDENT HENRY SUZZALO, PH. D., UNIVERSITY of WASHINGTON
CHARLES ALLEN PROSSER, PII. D., DIRECTOR. DUN woody INSTITUTE, MINNEAPOLIs
PROFESSOR EDWARD F. BUCHNER, PH. D., Johns Hopkins UNIversity
WILLIAM PAXTON BURRIS DEAN College For TEACHERs, UNIVERSITY of CINCINNATI
PRESIDENT LOUIS W. RAPEER, PH. D., RESEARCH UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C.
ALBERT LEONARD, PH. D., SUPT. of Schools, NEw Roch ELLE, N. Y.
H. B. WILSON, SUPT. of ScHools, BERKELEY, CALIFoRNIA
E. C. BROOME, Ph. D., SUPT. of SCHOOLs, PHILADELPHIA PA.
JAMES WINGATE, Ass'T IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, N. Y. STATE DEP'T of EDUCATION
DR. A. C. HILL, NEw York STATE DEPARTMENT of EDUCATION
PROFESSOR: WILLIAM S. MORGAN, PH. D., BERKELEY. CALIFoRNIA
CLINTON P. McCORD, M. D., HEALTH DIRECTOR, PUBLIC SCHools, ALBANY, N. Y.
PROFESSOR DANIEL E. PHILLIPS, PH. D., UNIVERSITY OF DENVER

WOL. XXV NOVEMBER No. 3 CONTENTS FOR NOVEMBER 105 Editorials 108. The Teaching Personality Quotient A. R. Brubacher 113 Education and Individual Liberty Nicholas Murray Butler 116 The Convocation of the University of the State of New York 119 Successful Educators: Jesse II. Newlon 120 Program Annual Meeting of the New York State Teachers’ Association 122 Educational News and Comment: General News, College Notes. New York State Section 134 Regents' Questions and Answers: Physiology and Hygiene 136 Book Notices

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SPALDIN G'S Examination and Review Series

Athletic Library REGENTS’ QUESTIONS

No matter what sport you may be in

terested in, the Spalding Athletic Library AND ANSWERS

Series contains one or more books on the

1Ia subject. Send for complete list. New York Chicago San Francisco

(Stores in all other principal cities.) These books cover the New York State

Regents' semi-annual examinations. The answers have been prepared by an expert, are accurate and immediately follow ques

tions. Multiply Your Chances They give young students a correct idea of the kind and scope of questions asked

of securing the kind of position you and of acceptable answers. They have desire proven invaluable for review purposes.

Chemistry, 12 complete sets, 1914-1919.

Send for free folder and Price 40 cents postpaid. Physics, 14 com

plete sets, 1913-1919. Price 40 cents postpaid. Ten per cent discount on orders for

NEW YORK STATE 10 or more copies. TEACHERS’ BUREAU NEW YORK EDUCATION COMPANY 50 State St., Albany, N. Y. 50 State St. Albany, N. Y.

registration blank.

ENTERS ITS FORTY-SECOND YEAR AND VOLUME, SEPT., 1921

THE MAGAZINE “EDUCATION”

FRANK HERBERT PALMER, A. M., Editor $4.00 a Year 40 cents per Number Canadian Postage 20c; Foreign Postage 40c

The Oldest High-class Monthly Educational Magazine in the United States. Monthly,
Except July and August. Volume Title Page and Table of Contents for
Year in June Issue.

On our subscription list we have the names of leading educators in every state in the United States; also a select clientele in each of the following lands: South America, Mexico, New Zealand, New South Wales, Australia, England, Belgium, France, Sweden, Switzerland, India, China, Japan, Straits Settlements, Korea, Philippine Islands, Hawaii, Porto Rico, the Maritime Provinces, and all parts of Canada.

If you take other periodicals, let us quote lowest clubbing rates on your entire list.

SAMPLE TESTIMONIALS

“Education is appreciated everywhere."—Geo. E. Walk, Lecturer on Education, N. Y. University.
“A magazine which we much enjoy.”—Sister Mary Evangela, St. Xavier's Convent, Chicago, Iil.
“Of greatest value to all who are trying to formulate an educational theory.”—Pres. Faunce,
Brown University, R. I.
“The finest sample of educational journalism on the American market today.”—Dr. Wm. H.
Thaler, St. Louis, Mo.
“I have prized its visits as one prizes the coming of a friend.”—Betty A. Dutton, Cleveland, O.

The PALMER COMPANY, Publishers, 120 Boylston St. Boston, Mass.

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FROM KINDERGARTEN TO COLLEGE

NOVEMBER

VOL. XXV
N every section of the country college

attendance this year surpasses the

record of all previous years. On account of lack of room, not a

Better few colleges have had to Teaching refuse admission to hunin Colleges dreds of students. With

out trying to analyze the causes of this increased attendance at our higher institutions, it may be said that the larger number of young people seeking the benefit of college training means that the colleges and universities of the nation are in a position to exercise an ever-widening circle of influence upon the ideals of the nation. While this magazine does not wish to minimize the incalcuable good that our colleges and universities have brought to the American people, there is ample justification for saying that the contribution these institutions might make to the national life would be greatly increased if more attention were given to the question of how to secure better teaching in our college classrooms. A good deal is being written and spoken these days about the relation that popular education has to the realization of a complete vision of democratic education, but the colleges and universitics have a much larger share in helping the nation to reach this goal of democratic education than they seem to realize. The first essential toward the educational betterment of the American nation is better teaching in college classrooms. Educational progress is from the

EDITORIALS

top downward. Our secondary schools can never carry out their highest purpose until our college classrooms become centers of inspirational as well as scholarly teaching. The quality of the teaching in the high schools is shaped in a large measure by the spirit and methods of teaching found in the colleges. In turn the atmosphere of the high school classrooms determines the quality of the teaching in the elementary schools. It becomes, therefore, that better teaching in college classrooms is the first condition of progress toward universal education of a kind that will raise the whole population of the nation to a higher level of intelligence, conduct, and happiness. Our college officials may talk in glowing terms of the need of popula: education as a means of realizing the hopes of democracy, but this zeal for education could be most usefully shown in seeing to it that effective, stimulating teaching is found in the classrooms of our colleges and universities. College teaching which does not sel students on fire intellectually fails to reach the first goal of higher education. To make college students intellectually keen about something worth while must always remain the chief obligation of the college. This obligation can be mes only by having inspiring teaching in the classroom. College authorities charged with the responsibility of selecting in structors should place the value of teach. ers who have the knowledge-loving spirit in combination with the power to inspire

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