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COPYRIGHT, 1906, BY

ALBERT HARKNESS.

ORATIONS OF CICERO.

W. P. I

11687797

C

PREFACE

THE volume now offered to the public is intended to be emphatically a student's edition of the orations most frequently read in a Latin course preparatory for college. The orations which it contains are all fine specimens of Roman eloquence, and they illustrate the forensic, senatorial, and judicial departments of Roman oratory. They are arranged in the order in which, it is thought, they can be studied to best advantage. Before the text of each oration is placed a special introduction, intended to furnish the pupil with such information in regard to the occasion and the subject as the orator assumes to be already in the possession of his hearers. The principal rhetorical divisions of the orations are designated by the technical Latin terms usually employed by the ancient rhetoricians.

The text is that of C. F. W. Mueller, Leipzig, 1895 and 1896. Long vowels are marked in the first five orations only, as it is deemed important for the student of Cicero to have some practice in reading Latin without such aid.

The notes are intended to aid and guide the efforts of the student who has already had some experience in the reading of a Latin classic and is now just beginning the study of Roman oratory, a subject intimately connected with the public life of the Romans, and one which the student ought to find not only highly instructive, but deeply interesting. They aim, therefore, to give him the key to all really difficult passages, and at the same time to furnish him such collateral information upon Roman manners and customs, upon Roman history and life, as will enable him to understand, appreciate, and enjoy these

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masterpieces of Roman oratory. Care has, however, been ta not to interfere with that special course of direct instruc and illustration which belongs exclusively to the teacher.

In the notes questions are inserted at intervals to aid student in adding to his stock of knowledge in a definite fi such grammatical and historical information as his author pla within his reach or such as he may readily find elsewhere. 1 feature of the work, it is hoped, may also prove helpful to teacher in the difficult task of keeping the subject matter of orations steadily before the minds of his pupils, and may t enable him greatly to enrich his class-room work and to thi around it an interest which would otherwise be absolut impossible.

The volume is supplied with the needed maps and plans a with various pictorial illustrations inserted in the introduct and text, not for ornament, but for use. The learner will dou less find them helpful in his attempts to appreciate Rom life.

In the vocabulary the editors have aimed to give the prima meanings of words with such other meanings as the stude will need in translating the orations. They have also endea ored to treat the important subject of etymology in a simp and practical way, and thus to give the learner the advanta of seeing the significant elements which unite in forming con pound and derivative words.

The general introduction to this edition contains an outlir of the life of Cicero, a brief history of Roman oratory, a chron logical table of contemporaneous Roman history, and a sho treatise on Roman public life, giving an account of the divisior of the people, the powers and duties of the magistrates, of th senate, of the popular assemblies, and of the courts of justice This large amount of introductory matter seemed to be de manded to meet the special needs of the student of Roma oratory, and it will doubtless be welcomed by teachers in vier

ces of Roman oratory. Care has, however, been taken terfere with that special course of direct instruction ation which belongs exclusively to the teacher.

notes questions are inserted at intervals to aid the 1 adding to his stock of knowledge in a definite form imatical and historical information as his author places reach or such as he may readily find elsewhere. This the work, it is hoped, may also prove helpful to the the difficult task of keeping the subject-matter of the teadily before the minds of his pupils, and may thus m greatly to enrich his class-room work and to throw

an interest which would otherwise be absolutely

of the interest now taken in historical and political questions both in school and in college.

The notes and the vocabulary are the product of the joint labors of the three editors whose names stand on the title-page. For the introductions and the illustrations the senior editor alone is responsible.

My thanks are due to Harper & Company for permission to use the illustration of the Tumulus of Achilles from the “Ilios” of Dr. Schliemann, and to Houghton, Mifflin & Company and The Macmillan Company for the use of illustrations from Lanciani's "Ancient Rome" and Kelsey's edition of Mau's “ Pompeii," and to E. Becchetti of Rome for the use of his valuable drawings of the Restoration of the Forum and its Surroundings.

My thanks are also due to Professor J. H. Dickason of Wooster, Ohio, for his kindness in reading the proof and in making valuable suggestions.

In conclusion I desire once more to convey my sincere thanks to the classical teachers of the country, who by their fidelity and skill in the use of my previous books have contributed so largely to their success.

To their hands this volume is now respectfully and gratefully committed.

ume is supplied with the needed maps and plans and us pictorial illustrations inserted in the introduction hot for ornament, but for use. The learner will doubtthem helpful in his attempts to appreciate Roman

ALBERT HARKNESS.

BROWN UNIVERSITY.

'ocabulary the editors have aimed to give the primary of words with such other meanings as the student in translating the orations. They have also endeaveat the important subject of etymology in a simple cal way, and thus to give the learner the advantage he significant elements which unite in forming com

derivative words. Jeral introduction to this edition contains an outline of Cicero, a brief history of Roman oratory, a chronole of contemporaneous Roman history, and a short Roman public life, giving an account of the divisions ple, the powers and duties of the magistrates, of the he popular assemblies, and of the courts of justice. amount of introductory matter seemed to be demeet the special needs of the student of Roman d it will doubtless be welcomed by teachers in view

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