Theory of Elastic Stability

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Courier Corporation, 4 mag 2012 - 560 pagine
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The best available guide to the elastic stability of large structures, this book introduces the principles and theory of structural stability. It was co-authored by the father of modern engineering mechanics, Stephen Timoshenko, and James Gere, who updated the materials and worked closely with Dr. Timoshenko. Relevant to aspects of civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering, this classic covers the essentials of static and dynamic instabilities.
Topics range from theoretical explanations of 2- and 3-D stress and strain to practical applications such as torsion, bending, thermal stress, and wave propagation through solids. Additional subjects include beam columns, curved bars and arches, buckling of rings, and experiments and design formulas. Particularly suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of engineering, this volume is also an indispensable reference for professionals.
 

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Informazioni sull'autore (2012)

James M. Gere (1925-2008) earned his undergraduate and master's degree in Civil Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1949 and 1951, respectively. He worked as an instructor and later as a Research Associate for Rensselaer. He was awarded one of the first NSF Fellowships, and chose to study at Stanford. He received his Ph.D. in 1954 and was offered a faculty position in Civil Engineering, beginning a 34-year career of engaging his students in challenging topics in mechanics, and structural and earthquake engineering. He authored nine texts on various engineering subjects starting in 1972 with Mechanics of Materials. He served as Department Chair and Associate Dean of Engineering and in 1974 co-founded the John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center at Stanford. In 1980, Jim Gere also became the founding head of the Stanford Committee on Earthquake Preparedness. That same year, he was invited as one of the first foreigners to study the earthquake-devastated city of Tangshan, China. Jim retired from Stanford in 1988 but continued to be an active and most valuable member of the Stanford community.

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