The History of Huntingdon: From the Earliest to the Present Times

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A.P. Wood, 1824 - 338 pagine
 

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Pagina 213 - When they submitted, their officers were knocked on the head, and every tenth man of the soldiers killed ; and the rest shipped for the Barbadoes.
Pagina 226 - I vainly thought myself a courtly young gentleman (for we courtiers valued ourselves much upon our good clothes). Icame into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor...
Pagina 223 - Thy instruments, to depend more upon Thyself. Pardon such as desire to trample upon the dust of a poor worm, for they are Thy People too. And pardon the folly of this short Prayer : — Even for Jesus Christ's sake. And give us a good night, if it be Thy pleasure. Amen.
Pagina 200 - had been rejected, he would have sold all he had " the next morning, and never have seen England " more ; and he knew there were many other " honest men of the same resolution.
Pagina 156 - Cause I am poor, deform'd, and ignorant, And like a bow buckled and bent together, By some more strong in mischiefs than myself, Must I for that be made a common sink, For all the filth and rubbish of men's tongues To fall and run into ? Some call me Witch, And being ignorant of myself, they go About to teach me how to be one; urging, That my bad tongue (by their bad usage made so) Forespeaks their cattle,* doth bewitch their corn, Themselves, their servants, and their babes at nurse. This they enforce...
Pagina 224 - And Judah and Israel dwelt safely, every man under his vine and under his fig-tree, from Dan even to Beer-sheba, all the days of Solomon.
Pagina 156 - And why on me ? why should the envious world Throw all their scandalous malice upon me ? 'Cause I am poor, deform'd, and ignorant, And like a bow buckled and bent together By some more strong in mischiefs than myself; Must I for that be made a common sink For all the filth and rubbish of men's tongues To fall and run into ? Some call me Witch, And being ignorant, of myself, they go About to teach me how to be one...

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