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frankness and shame in his manner and accent, “I should like to pay that money for Mamie, and let her be a princess, if it would make her happy. I should like to shut the lantern jaws of that Don Caesar, who'd be too glad if anything happened to break off Mamie's match; but I shouldn't touch that capital—unless you'd lend it to me. If you'll take a note from me, payable if the property ever becomes yours, I'd thank you. A mortgage on the old house and garden, and the lands I bought of Don Caesar, outside the mine, will screen you.” “If that pleases you,” said the old man, with a smile, “have your way; and if I tear up the note, it does not concern you.” It did please the distinguished capitalist of Rough-and-Ready: for the next few days his face wore a brightened expression, and he seemed to have recovered his old tranquillity. There was,

in fact, a slight touch of consequence in his man

ner, the first ostentation he had ever indulged in, when he was informed one morning at his private office that Don Caesar Alvarado was in the counting-house, desiring a few moments’ conference. “Tell him to come in,” said Mulrady, shortly. The door opened upon Don Caesar— erect, sallow, and grave. Mulrady had not seen him since his return from Europe, and even his inexperienced eyes were struck with the undeniable ease and grace with which the young Spanish American had assimilated the style and fashion of an older civilization. It seemed rather as if he had returned to a familiar condition than adopted a new one. “Take a cheer,” said Mulrady. The young man looked at Slinn with quietly persistent significance. “You can talk all the same,” said Mulrady, accepting the significance. “He’s my private secretary.” “It seems that for that reason we might choose another moment for our conversation,” returned Don Caesar, haughtily. “Do I understand you cannot see me now 2" Mulrady hesitated. He had always revered and recognized a certain social superiority in Don Ramon Alvarado; somehow his son—a young man of half his age, and once a possible son-inlaw—appeared to claim that recognition also. He rose without a word, and preceded Don Caesar upstairs into his drawing-room. The alien portrait on the wall seemed to evidently take sides with Don Caesar, as against the common intruder, Mulrady. “I hoped the Señora Mulrady might have saved me this interview,” said the young man, stiffly; “or at least have given you some intimation of the reason why I seek it. posed my talking to you in the presence of the unfortunate Soñor Esslinn himself, it appears she has not.” “I don’t know what you're driving at, or what Mrs. Mulrady's got to do with Slinn or you,” said Mulrady, in angry uneasiness. “Do I understand,” said Don Caesar, sternly, “that Señora Mulrady has not told you that I intrusted to her an important letter, belonging to

Señor Esslinn, which I had the honor to discover

in the wood, six months ago, and which she said she would refer to you?” “Letter?” echoed Mulrady, slowly—“my wife had a letter of Slinn's?” Don Caesar regarded the Millionaire attentively. “It is as I feared,” he said, gravely. do not know, or you would not have remained silent.” He then briefly recounted the story of his finding Slinn's letter, his exhibition of it to the invalid, its disastrous effect upon him, and his innocent discovery of the contents. “I believed myself at that time on the eve of being allied with your family, Señor Mulrady,” he said, haughtily; “and when I found myself in possession of a secret which affected its integrity and good name, I did not choose to leave it in the helpless hands of its imbecile owner, or his sillier children, but proposed to trust it to the care of the señora, that she and you might deal with it as became your honor and mine. I followed her to Paris, and gave her the letter there. She affected to laugh at any pretension of the writer, or any claim he might have on your bounty; but

she kept the letter, and, I fear, destroyed it. You

will understand, Señor Mulrady, that when I found that my attentions were no longer agreeable to your daughter, I had no longer the right to speak to you on the subject, nor could I, without misapprehension, force her to return it. I should have still kept the secret to myself if I had not, since my return here, made the nearer acquaintance of Señor Esslinn's daughters. I cannot present myself at his house, as a suitor for the hand of the Señorita Washti until I have asked his absolution for my complicity in the wrong that has been done to him. I cannot, as a caballero, do that without your permission. It is for that purpose I am here.” It needed only this last blow to complete the humiliation that whitened Mulrady's face. But his eye was none the less clear and his voice none the less steady as he turned to Don Caesar. “You know perfectly the contents of that letter?” “I have kept a copy of it.” “Come with me.” He preceded his visitor down the staircase and back into his private office. Slinn looked up at his employer's face in unrestrained anxiety. Mul: rady sat down at his desk, wrote a few hurried lines, and rang a bell. A messenger appeared from the counting-room. “Send that to the bank.” He wiped his pen as methodically as if he had not at that moment countermanded the order to pay his daughter's dowry, and turned quietly to Inn. Slim Don Caesar Alvarado has found the letter you wrote your wife on the day you made your strike in the tunnel that is...now my shaft. He gave the letter to Mrs. Mulrady; but he has kept a copy.”

As you just now pro-.

“You

Unheeding the frightened gesture of entreaty from Slinn, equally with the unfeigned astonishment of Don Caesar, who was entirely unprepared for this revelation of Mulrady's and Slinn's confidences, he continued: “He has brought the copy with him. I reckon it would be only square for you to compare it with what you remember of

the original.”

In obedience to a gesture from Mulrady, Don Caesar mechanically took from his pocket a folded paper, and handed it to the paralytic. But Slinn's trembling fingers could scarcely unfold the paper; and as his eyes fell upon its contents, his convulsive lips could not articulate a word. “Pr'aps I’d better read it for you,” said Mulrady, gently. “You kin follow me and stop me when I go wrong.” He took the paper, and in a dead silence read as follows: “DEAR WIFE,-I’ve just struck gold in my tunnel, and you must get ready to come here with the children at once. It was after six months' hard work; and I’m so weak I.... It's a fortune for us all. We should be rich even if it were only a branch vein dipping west toward the next tunnel, instead of dipping east, according to my theory—” “Stop!” said Slinn, in a voice that shook the TOOm. Mulrady looked up. “It's wrong, ain't it?” he asked, anxiously; “it should be east toward the next tunnel.” “No 1 It's right / I am wrong! wrong!” Slinn had risen to his feet, erect and inspired. “Don’t you see,” he almost screamed, with passionate vehemence, “it’s Masters's abandoned tumnel your shaft has struck. Not mine. It was Masters's pick you found. I know it now.” “And your own tunnel?” said Mulrady, springing to his feet in his excitement. “And your Strike?” “Is still there.” The next instant, and before another question could be asked, Slinn had darted from the room. In the exaltation of that supreme discovery he regained the full control of mind and body. Mulrady and Don Caesar, no less excited, followed him precipitately, and with difficulty kept up with his feverish speed. Their way lay along the base of the hill below. Mulrady's shaft, and on a line with Masters's abandoned tunnel. Only once he stopped, to snatch a pick from the hand of an astonished Chinaman at work in a ditch, as he still kept on his way, a quarter of a mile beyond the shaft. Here he stopped before a jagged hole in the hill-side. Bared to the sky and air, the very openness of its abandonment, its unpropitious position, and distance from the strike in Mulrady's shaft, had no doubt preserved its integrity from wayfarer or prospector. “You can’t go in there alone and without a light,” said Mulrady, laying his hand on the arm of the excited man. “Let me get more help and proper tools.” “I know every step in the dark as in the daylight,” returned Slinn, struggling. “Let me go, while I have yet strength and reason. Stand aside l’” - He broke from them, and the next moment was swallowed up in the yawning blackness. They waited with bated breath until, after a seeming eternity of night and silence, they heard his returning footsteps, and ran forward to meet him. As he was carrying something clasped to his breast, they supported him to the opening. But at the same moment the object of his search and his burden, a misshapen wedge of gold and quartz, dropped with him, and both fell together, with equal immobility, to the ground. He had still strength to turn his fading eyes to the other Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready, who leaned over him. “You—see,” he gasped, brokenly, “I was not —crazy!” No. He was dead! THE END.

We're all

UP THE CAMEROON'S RIVER FROM BELL TOWN TO BUDIMAN.

See illustration on double page of Supplement.

ROM the Cameroons Mountains, on the west coast of Africa, in Upper Guinea, flows an estuary with the same name, inhabited by the Dualas, a shrewd, intelligent people, who have long acted as middle-men between the tribes of the interior and the European traders, from whom, as well as from the Baptist missionaries there, they have picked up much English, and even some knowledge of reading and writing. They are a noisy people, however, and Mr. H. H. Johnston, who made the journey illustrated by our spirited sketches, says that while drawing the accompanying sketch of Bell Town Beach, the bathers kept up such a hubbub that he could scarcely hear what was said by his comrade looking over his shoulder. Both men and women are finely developed, and the latter have magnificent hair, which they take great pains in plaiting. The portrait given of Yote Makuri, a young married woman of Hickory Town, in the midst of this lengthy process, shows the abundant growth of hair which is common among these people. Bell Town is the head-quarters of the traders and capital of the chief, Bell, who sent his son and a guide down the river with Mr. Johnston. The course lay for more than twenty miles through a mangrove forest, which was followed by a growth of screw-pine, skirted along the swampy shore by a fringe of tall Lissochilus orchids, which grew to a height of six feet, and reared their lovely heads of large mauve blossoms, and which were finally crowded out by lofty forest trees, acacias, albizzias, parinariums, bombaxes, eriodendrons, and sycamore-figs, while raphia palms were striking objects, with their

mighty plume-like fronds and orange-red midribs, and the oil-palm grew in graceful clusters, often leaning forward over the water for want of space to expand, and the little calamus palm scaled the topmost trees of the forest with its hooked fronds, and when it had clambered to their summits, burst into gray-green blossom, and in some places already exhibited its scarlet ripened fruit. It was a pretty sight in this portion of the river to see the trading canoes sailing up-stream with the sea-breeze, and sticking into the prows of their narrow craft a huge feather-like frond of the raphia palm, which was mast and sail all in One. On the second day they reached the village of Banyong-Bosua, and were hospitably received by the chief, whose house bore marks of civilization scarcely to be looked for in the wilds of Africa. It was built, like all the houses between Old Calabar and the Congo, on a platform of beaten earth raised nearly three feet above the level of the street. The floor inside was quite hard, like cement, and seemed to be of worked clay, hardened by the action of fire. A native bedstead stood in a recess at each end of the one room, and over both bedsteads gay-colored mosquito-curtains hung. In the centre of the apartment was placed a huge table, only raised some eighteen inches from the ground, and covered with a white cloth. On this was neatly arranged all the host's collection of pottery and glass-ware. This included several big claret jugs, “Uncle Toby” mugs, and “sittinghen” butter dishes. There were also, strange to say, two little jugs of Doulton ware. Along one side of the room ran a massive wooden settle, on which were piled rows of tin boxes containing the proprietor's chief valuables. Near the beds were placed high wooden sideboards or buffets. All these articles of furniture—table, settle, and buffet—were entirely of native workmanship, and were made from native woods. There was an unusual amount of skill in their construction, and it was remarkable that they were made by joinery, and not merely carved out of solid blocks, as is the usual fashion in savage Africa. A number of pretty and fancifully designed stools (vide illustration) completed the furniture. A little below, the junction of the river with the Dibomba formed a wide expanse of water, called Hippopotamus Pool, from the extraordinary numbers of these huge creatures that made their appearance. Budiman, which was reached the next day at noon, was a pretty town two miles long, with fine shade trees alternating with short, broad streets, running at right angles to the river. The smiling aspect of the surrounding landscape, with its abundant crops of maize, edible arums, sweet-potatoes, and beans, with here and there the glistening green of the banana fronds and the swaying plumes of the oil-palm, suggested the sketch entitled “Peace and Plenty.” Beyond this was obtained a fine view of a grand chain of peaked mountains at the north, the height of the two largest peaks of which was estimated at ten or twelve thousand feet. Hereabouts was found a curious forge, differing from most African ones, the bellows being made of the broad, pliable leaves of the banana. A man sits astride on the sloping wooden block behind the bellows, and works up and down their upright handles, thus driving a current of air through the hollow cone of wood and the double-barrelled iron pipes (fitted with a stone muzzle) into the furnace, which is a glowing mass of charcoal between two huge slabs of stone. - In the outskirts of Budiman was noticed a gaylooking house painted blue and white, with a strange-looking figure on the door, designed for a pigeon, but equally resembling a dog or antelope. The owner, Nsia, however, was very proud of his drawing, and of his quaint, home-made furniture, as well as his hair-comb, a sketch of which is given, and also of the decorative pigeon. The only inhabitant of one of the last Budiman villages, where the travellers stopped to cook their breakfast, was a little black boy playing with a fallen orange under the shade of an orangetree, the men having all gone to their fishing, and the women to the fields. They made friends with the little fellow, and shared their meal with him, then left him alone with the remembrance of benevolent white goblins with which to astonish his friends. On their return the travellers made an excursion up the Dibomba River, an affluent of the main stream, which was positively blocked with hippopotami, which were so fearless and curious that they had actually to be kept at bay. Among them was a crocodile that crept upon the sandbank where the party was taking lunch, and having wriggled himself into a comfortable position, sat complacently while his picture was sketched.

“PORTRAIT OF MADAME J-.”

See illustration on page 9.

HE type of beauty to which M. Janet introduces us in this portrait bears some resemblance to that of the Sarah Bernhardt order, and was well received at the latest Paris Salon. That the painter is a native of Paris and a pupil of Cabanel seems altogether natural, for in Madame J we see a true Parisian, and in her portrait a reminiscence of a school of which the famous author of “The Birth of Venus” is easily the head —a reminiscence, we say, because Cabanel's influence over his disciple is suggestive rather than effective. M. Janet copies nature much, and is held but lightly by the strings of the École des Beaux Arts. The face that he creates has solid, distinctive features, all of them in attention, and the picture as a whole is endowed with the gift of life and of truth. Its type of beauty does not recall Tennyson's aphorism that all women kick against their lords. One thinks rather of Shakespeare's safer observation, “Praise we may afford to any lady that subdues a lord.”

THE CHRISTMAS TREE. BY HARRIET PRESCOTT SPOFFORD.

ROWN in dark woods and green-gloomed depths Where dewy branches came to sight In shaking emeralds as they stirred Beneath the quick bird's glancing flight—

Grown in the open air of heaven,
Companion of the summer night,

Companion of the wandering winds
And fierce-winged tempests fanning white—

Now, once where tangled stars seemed caught,
Fair waxen tapers flaming bright,

And hung with largess and with flowers,
And hailed with outcry of delight—

O Christmas Tree, art thou the same In all this panoply of light

As that accurséd tree which grew On cruel Calvary's awful height?

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.

A. M. H.-For a combination suit for a girl of fifteen, consult Bazar No. 49, Vol. XIX. HousewlFr.—The white and gold decoration of wood-work and furniture is not a fleeting fashion. Such work has been a stand-by of French decorators who are fond of the Louis XV. and Louis XVI. styles. Such decoration if well done is refined and graceful, but would be quite expensive; cheaply done, it would not be successful. It'should be put in the hands of some good firm of decorators (not amateurs). Your sugo about chintz is very good. It is advisable to et the walls have plenty of time to dry before H.; or papering. Pine imitating cherry would not be goo for the fireplaces, better have the pine stained slightly, or painted in good neutral colors, such as olive, dark reen, reddish-brown, etc., to suit the room. For the hall no hard wood is handsomer than oak stained to tone down the color. If the walls are to be painted, a É. shade of red, such as may be obtained by a comYination of Venetian red, raw umber, chrome-yellow, etc., will be suitable. If you decide not to use white and gold for the drawing-room, but wish to use light colors, such as robin's-egg blue, or yellowish-pinks, the wood-work may be painted an ivory white (this is made by mixing deep chrome-yellow with the white aint in such Po as to take away the cold Sluish look of the plain white without making it a definite yellow). . The dining-room and library may be darker. A good scheme for the dining-room would be wall-paper and furniture-covering of old tapestry design of neutral background, broken up with warmer and brighter colors in the figure; Turkish or Persian rugs could take the place of the carpet. For the library the walls could be olive green with a deep frieze, enriched with a bluish-green, copper bronze, and yellowish-white. The furniture covering should be leather, if possible. PIDEE.—Cream white is best suited to an uncertain complexion. The crystal trimming is in good taste, and the dress may be used in the summer. MARIr D.—Get diagonal silk and wool like that described for a black dress in New York Fashions of Bazar No. 50, Vol. XIX. Little TYooon.-Velveteen is better than corduroy for a suit, you will sometimes use in the evening, and a dressy cloth suit is still better. Read descriptions of such suits in late numbers of the Bazar. Why not have a velveteen basque with cloth skirts, all of one shade of green, golden brown, or dull red 7 The shawl drapery is rather passe. F. B. C.—A cloth suit, red, green, brown, or blue, with some velvet or plush trimming, is appropriate for church for a girl of sixteen. An Astrakhan coat is rather sombre for her; so get seal-skin instead, or else have a jacket of heavy cloth the color of her dress. The Newmarket should be as long as her dress, but not longer. Close-brimmed high-crowned hats are pre.." to Gainsboroughs, though the latter are also used. Suissortiiser.—White silk handkerchiefs are more used than colored ones both by ladies and men. Moxir. –If it is becoming to her, it is right for a girl of seventeen to wear high coiffures, but low plaits are more fashionable for }.}}|..." R. A.—White enamelled or else plain gold studs are best for either old or very young men. Get a white serge or else pale P. or blue cashmere for a house dress for a girl of seventeen; or, if she must have silk, get lead blue or dull red instead of black. EMMA C.—Dermatologists claim that superfluous hair can be permanently removed by applying an electric needle to each hair and thus destroying the follicles., You should, however, consult your physician, and let him advise you whom to employ. A.D.—The wedding and engagement rings are worn on the same finger—the third of the left hand. Jackets, piped with velvet folds half an inch wide, velvet collar, cuffs, and pocket flaps, are made of the imaterial of the wool dress, or else there is a small cape of the wool with sling sleeves showing a fancy sining of striped silk or plush; a fur collar is the only trimming needed for this. , Christmas presents for men are calendars, paper - knives, paper-weights, new books, a picture, a silk muffler in broad stripes of dark colors, or else of cream white silk, an inkstand, toilette bottles, blotters of various kinds, pendants for watch chains, a hanging banner of shaving-papers, a hanging pin-cushion, an upright pin-cushion in money-bag shape, a balsalm-fir pillow, a rug, or any hanging drapery of embroidery or rich old stuffs to arrange on pictures or a cabinet, or to take the place of old-fashioned tidies. . A. F.—The velvet jacket would suit better as a basque for the house. Get the good of your brocade satin by using the dress without altering it, as satin may not be worn another year. J. S.—Have your cards engraved in script, using the first name and initial of the middle name—as * Mr. Henry M. Jones.” IN HASTR.—Your changeable satin will look very pretty made up with a blue velvet plastron, revers, and panels, a plain basque, and long ol. B. J. H.--You cannot wear a seal brown plush wrap of any design when dressing in mourning. Wear the jackets that belong to your cloth suits. Your paper is appropriate for writing regrets upon. Send your visiting card so that it will arrive during the reception, or on the day thereof if in a distant city: this plan is better than sending regrets to large entertainments. A Subsoitiibee.—Your dark red cashmere is a good color, and should be made with a vest and panels of striped plush. Write a note of congratulation to your friend on her marriage; to an acquaintance who sends cards *...; her marriage send a visiting card with “Congratulations” written upon it. ...A. L.-Amazon or ladies' clotl is best for a ridinghabit. ...A cut pattern of a habit will be sent you from this office. Any fashionable hatter will supply you with a high silk hat for riding. MBs. W. B. W.-We have not the patterns you mention. CoNSTANT: READr.R.—A scarf on the mantel, or else a valance falling close and straight below it, is more onable than a draped lambrequin. Plush is still lused. WostroNER.—A boa and muff of badger, lynx, or black marten is a suitable choice for a bride. The ushers and groom wear any white flower for boutonnières. Enclose the invitations in two envelops, unless you leave them at the door, when one is enough. Both envelops are addressed. It is proper to send invitations by mail. The newly married couple send out their cards, as soon as they are ready to receive, announcing their reception days. Address the envelop to “Mr. Smith,” but write your thanks to “Dear Mr. and Mrs. Smith.”

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rTHE reigning Sultan of Turkey, Abdul Hamid,
is the thirty-fourth ruler of the Osman dy-
nasty, and the twenty-eighth since the taking of
Constantinople. He was born September 21,
1842, and is the second son of the Sultan Abdul
Medjid, having succeeded his deposed elder bro-
ther, Mourad W., in 1876. His eldest son, Mo-
hammed Selim, is a lad of sixteen. Abdul Ham-
id is described by one who knows him as a small,
spare man, with an olive complexion, and restless
black eyes that are constantly wandering, as if in
apprehension of some danger. He lives in con-
stant fear of assassination, which is not strange,
since a violent death seems the manifest destiny
of the rulers of Turkey, and never quits his pal-
ace except to go to prayers, when he goes forth
surrounded by an army of guards, carefully con-
cealing from the public the name of the mosque
to which he is going. The annual visit which he
is obliged to pay to the Mosque of St. Sophia is
regarded by him with great dread, and is made
with every possible precaution. He is cour-
teous in his bearing, and very polite to Amer-
icans.
Among the sketches given this week will be
found a fine picture of the Mosque of Suleiman
the Magnificent, the most beautiful mosque in
Constantinople. It was built with the intention
of surpassing St. Sophia, which it far excels in
grandeur, and was thirty-six years in construction,
having been begun in 1550. It has four minarets,
two large ones with three galleries, and two small
ones with two galleries, a large central dome,
equalling that of St. Sophia in diameter, and ex-

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MOSQUE OF SULEIMAN THE MAGNIFICENT.

man blood in him; if good examples of the race are sought, they must be looked for in the Asiatic vilayets. It is possible to live many years in the city and yet know nothing of them but as they appear in the streets. With their women it is almost impossible to become acquainted. Every window of the haremlik, or women's quarters in a Turkish house, is closely latticed, and their retirement, although less strict than with the Persians, has relaxed very little of recent years. During early summer large bodies of them collect at the Valley of the Sweet Waters. This is the best opportunity for seeing them en masse. The richer hanoums are fond of riding about in broughams. At such times as the Bairams, the Mevloud, and the anniversary of the Sultan's accession to the throne, the streets are crowded with these carriages; it is perhaps unnecessary to say that their occupants are not accompanied by their husbands, but under the surveillance of their drivers or mounted attendants; in nearly every case they will be found stout and elderly. Now and again a memorable face may be descried. Intrigues of the sort common in the Levant are practically unknown with Turkish women. However intimate you may become with a Turk, you will never pass beyond the zelamlik. Upon the railways, tramways, and steamers there is a compartment reserved for the fairer sex. This seclusion is not, as might be supposed, against the women's feelings; will has been lost in habit, and a woman who transgressed the proprieties established would be the scorn of every harem. It is a rare thing to see a turban proper upon the head of any person; the fez is worn everywhere; by strict Turks a compromise is ef.

ceeding it twenty feet in height, two half domes, soft/ fected by folding a handkerchief round the fez, and ten small ones. In front of the mosque is a ------- oft o and the head-dress which results is very becomlarge court, surrounded by a gallery formed of & N N § N\o o o o % - ing. The fez suits a man with a finely developed twenty-four columns, each sustaining a cupola. - N N N % % o head; otherwise it gives him a comical orang

All mosques have fountains and washing places §§ N - §o. o* % outang look. So fond of it are its wearers that for the ablutions of the true believers before go- - § N N §§ - soo% they refuse to displace it. It is worn at the theing to prayer. As the washing must be done &N § > -- - o % % atres, at dinner, etc., and, for aught that is known with running water, outside the principal mosques o, - NS$ oft % % % 2. to the contrary, may be slept in, for apart from numerous little taps along the flanking walls pour o soft o 2. the tassel it would form an admirable nightcap. forth narrow streams of water, splashing onto % - ~ When finally off duty it reposes upon a block like

slabs of white marble, giving a cool and very re-
freshing sensation as the liquid sparkles in the
sunlight.
All sorts and conditions of men abound at Con-
stantinople. The Turks, although the ruling peo-
ple, are in the minority. The Constantinople Turk

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a barrister's wig.
A Turk is a fine sight on horseback, for he is
a born rider; he proceeds easily with long stir-
rups and loose rein, balancing his body to every
motion of the horse. Perhaps he relies too much
upon the balance, and would find himself at sea

is a hybrid creature, with very little real Turk- ABDUL HAMID, SULTAN OF TURKEY. where a stiff grip is necessary.

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(13) beautiful colored plates, only Three Dollars go a year. 6 months, 3 colored plates, on trial for 1.00.

Sample copy, with Jack or yellow roses, or beautiful large marine (by Edward Moran), only 20 cents. No Free Copies. Illustrated Catalogue IFREE.

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F. G. OTTO & SONS, Manufacturers of Surgical Instruments, Trusses, lastic Stockings, &c., 345 Fourth Avenue, New York.

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"WASTE EMBROIDERY SILKI

Factory Ends at half price; one ounce in a box-all good silk and good colors. Sent by mail on receipt of 40 cents, 100 Crazy Stitches in each package. Send Postal note or Stamps to Thr brainerd-Armstrong spool, SILK Co., 621 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. or 469 Broadway, New York.

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LADIES, MME, JULIAN'S SPECIFIC Is absolutely the only unfailing remedy for removing radically and permanently all Superfluous Hair from Lips, Cheeks, Chin, Arms, &c., without injuring the skin, which neither torturous electricity nor any of the advertised poisonous stufts can accomplish. Address Mme. JULIAN, 4S East 20th St., New York.

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which is the Priestley trade-mark.

Le Boutillier Bros., and others.

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FIRSTFTSTM

Include a complete line of Camel-Hair Cloths, for both Costumes and Wraps, of extra quality; the Real
India Cloth, uniting the Camel-Hair effect with the graceful folds of Indian draperies, and the new
Silk-Warp Diagonals and Serges, the softest and most luxurious of materials, yet firm in texture and
equally suitable in and out of mourning. None genuine unless rolled on a “Warnished Board,”

They are for sale by all the principal dealers in the large cities, and in New York City by Lord & Taylor, Stern Bros., Jackson's Mourning Store, B. Altman & Co., Simpson, Crawford, & Simpson,

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EL-HAIR FABRICS

THE ART AMIATEUR (Established 1879)

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Single Copies, 35 cents. Yearly Subscription, $3.62.

This is in many respects the most superior Fashion Journal in the world. It is printed monthly in six civilized languages, and has a circulation all over the world. It is the chef d'oeuvre of one of the largest publishing houses in Paris. It is an authority in every respect on the subject of dress. From it there is no appeal. Its English edition is the sole property of this house. It contains from seventy to eighty uncolored cuts, a colored plate, also model sheet from which patterns of the illustrations may be traced with a wheel. For general use for dressmakers, milliners, or the family, it is without a competitor.

LE BON TON

AND T.E IMONITEUR DE LA IMODE

UNITED. (MONTHLY.) Single Copies, 60 cents. Yearly Subscription, $6.12. This journal is printed in Paris, and far surpasses any fashion paper everseen in America. Its principal attractions are four handsome, beautifully and artistically colored steel plates. Besides these, it contains sixteen pages, ten of which are devoted to wood-cuts of the most elaborate and fashionable designs to be worn in Paris, with articles of fashion, description of plates, and other interesting and useful matter. The whole is incased in a beautiful cover.

S. T. TAYLOR2S ILLUSTRATED

MONTHLY FASHION REPORT

appearsabout the Twentieth of every month, inadvance. It contains a large number of wood-cuts, representing the leading styles in Ladies' Toilets, Hats, Bonnets, &c., that are to be worn in Paris during the following months; besides this, an article on Fashions prepared for us with the greatest care by our agents in Paris; and many hints and information invaluable to the professional dressmaker, as well as to the private lady who appreciates elegance and correct style of dress. Single Copy, 6 cents. Yearly Subscription, 50 cents. POSTAGE FREE. For sale at all Newsdealers' and Booksellers’. S. T. TAYLOR, Publisher, 930 Broadway, N. Y.

To gives a profusion of Workfor 3 months' Hing Designs for Oil, WaterColor, and China Painting, trial sub- Carving, Embroidery, and every other kind of amascription. teur art work and Interior Decoration. Superb Designs in Color. Specimen copy, with colored plate, 25c. Prospectus for 1887 free on application. Mention this paper. MonTAGUE MARKs, Publisher, 23 Union Square, New York. “The Best Practical Art Magazine.”

For the cure of Corns use COME-OFF. Four so-os applications, and off they come. Sold by all

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IEXPLORATIONS IN THE RAIAN
DESERT.
See illustration on page 5.
HE Bahr Jousef, or River of Joseph, which
parts from the Nile half-way between Cairo

and Thebes, was reputed by the ancients to contain the two greatest wonders of the world, the

... mysterious Labyrinth, with its 3000 chambers,

and Lake Moeris, the artificial sea into which the Patriarch Joseph drained the Fayoom, and redeemed the fertile Delta. This lake was described as a depression over 250 feet deep, and from 250 to 450 miles in circumference. So Mr. Cope Whitehouse set to work to find it. He visited a part of the desert which had never been explored, and satisfied himself and the scientific world that by the side of the Nile there are two immense depressions, with an area of a thousand square miles, below the level of the Mediterranean. He was strengthened in his faith in the Greek accounts of Lake Moeris by the Arabic stories of the Patriarch Joseph. “When Joseph,” says an Arabic manuscript, which once belonged to Cardinal Mazarin, “was a hundred years old, and Premier of Egypt, high in favor with King Raian, the courtiers became jealous of his power, and applied to the sovereign to dismiss him, alleging that, however able in earlier life, he had now lost all administrative capacity. The King required that before he was deprived of his office he should be put to some test. At that time the Fayoom was a sea, filled with water from the Nile. The courtiers said, ‘Let Joseph drain the Fayoom.’ Joseph accepted the task. He made the Bahr Jousef, with a dike to regulate the flow of the water into the Fayoom, and another canal to take the surplus water into the Western Desert. Then the water in the Fayoom evaporated, and it became the richest province of Egypt,” and so continues to the present day. ii. noble stream, known as the canal of the Patriarch Joseph at Behnesa, the oldest artificial watercourse in the world, discharges at high Nile over twenty million cubic metres of water daily into the canals and basins of Middle Egypt and the fields of the Fayoom. It was visited and photographed by Mr. Cope Whitehouse in March, 1886. He made an expedition into the desert. with the Sheik of the Little Oasis, and photographed the level desert to the west of Behnesa, where the tombs and mosques show that a large population must have lived, but all now is barren Waste. Every great mound in Egypt covers the ruins of a town. On the Bahr Jousef, just before it turns into the Fayoom, is a mound so extensive that the Arabs call it “the mother of mounds.” Under the vast piles of earth are buried the remains of the ancient Hanes, mentioned in Isaiah (Isaiah, xxx. 4). It has hitherto escaped attention. Yet the great City of Hercules contains the portico of the only temple in the Greek style now standing in Egypt, not old for Egypt, and built centuries after the visit of the Jewish ambassadors to Pharaoh. Who can tell what rich archaeological treasures of earlier date lie beneath these heaps? The capital of the Fayoom, Medinet-el-Fayoom, with a handsome palace built by Mehemet Ali, is the residence of the hospitable Mudir, Murad Pasha. One of the principal streams of the Bahr Jousef passes through the town, and issues into the country beyond underneath the bridge and mosque of Kait Bey. The view from this point is perhaps the most attractive in the province. The country beyond is a succession of plateaux, the lowest being about 120 feet below the level of the Mediterranean, and 200 feet below the rushing sea of waters, eight miles wide, when the angry Nile in flood beats vainly against the dike at El-Lahun. In February the government, keenly alive to the importance of a great reservoir of Nile water, lent Mr. Cope Whitehouse a staff of engineers to verify the old tale of the engineering works of Joseph. For, not contented with cultivating the Fayoom, the Jewish Premier volunteered to accomplish the much greater task of running off the surplus water of the high Nile into the Wadi Raian, and storing up each year enough to replenish the scant streams and fill the dry canals of the spring months. The previous observations were fully confirmed. The bushes in the foreground are about 120 feet below the Nile. The steep cliff beyond rises 320 feet above “the sea.” The valley bears the sobriquet of Joseph's Pharaoh, Raian, or “the Irrigator,” as the canal retains the name of Joseph. In the Ain Raian depression, described as the most wonderful Lake of Moeris, all now is waterless desert, except in three places. The Spring of Raian is a bustling little brook, clear as crystal, but strongly sulphurous, which gushes up to lose itself after thirty yards. In a corner of a long valley which trends to the south-southeast are the ruins of a Coptic monastery (Deir Moélleh). On the wall of the chapel is the figure of St. George and his horse; but the archaeologist will regard the Copto-Corinthian capital, half buried in the sand, as of peculiar importance as identifying this spot with the lost city of Dionysias, which stood, we are informed by Claudius Ptolemy, on the shores of Lake Moeris. After the return of Mr. Whitehouse, Colonel Ardagh, of the Royal Engineers, offered to accompany him on a fresh expedition, which was intended to be preparatory to an exhaustive survey of the whole area next November. In this hasty recommoissance in April it was not necessary to provide for more than two days in the desert.

*A* The Bedouin guard, the British soldier, the Ital

ian engineer of the Cadastre, show how many nationali.es are interested in Egypt. Colonel Ar

\dagh is away to the right, too busy to be photo"graphed, and the other chief of the expedition is

behind his camera. *.

--

A NEW VIEW OF CONSUMPTION,

AND ONE which APPEALs To CoMMON - SENSE. MANY CURABLE CASEs. [Medical Stilus.] - . “MANY persons die of Consumption who could easily be cured,” says Dr. S. C. Clark, of Watertown, N.Y., “if they would go at it right. I have a new view of the disease. Consumption is not always of lung origin.” “How so? What is it, then?” “Many cases of Consumption are secondary. The disease itself prevails everywhere, but the best practitioners refuse to attribute it entirely to inheritance or the weather. If a person lives in the most favorable climate in the world and has any tendency to lung weakness, if certain conditions exist in the system, that climate, however favorable, will not prevent development of the disease. The disorder in such cases is only a secondary symptom in the lungs of some other ailment, and can never be cured until approached through its source.” “Yes, doctor; but what is the method of approach * “If you dip your finger in acid you burn it, do you not ?” {{ Yes.” “If you wash this burned finger every second with the acid, what is the result 2" “Why, constant inflammation, festering, and eventual destruction of the finger.” “Precisely Now then for my method, which commends itself to the reason and judgment of every skilful practitioner. You know certain acids are developed in the body. Well, if the system is all right these acids are neutralized or utilized and carried out. If the system is run down by excesses, anxiety, continual exposure, or overwork these acids accumulate in the blood. If there is any natural weakness in the lung, this acid attacks it, having a natural affinity for it, and if the acid is not neutralized or passed out of the system, it burns, ulcerates, and finally destroys the lung. Is this clear?”

“Perfectly But how do you prevent the ac- |

cumulation of these acids in the system *" “Irregularities of the liver and kidneys create this excess of acid, and the supply can be cut off only by correcting the wrong action of these organs. The kidneys alone should carry out in quantity, in solution, enough of this acid daily, which, if left in the blood, would kill four men. When the stomach, the liver, and the kidneys are all conspiring to increase the acid, the wonder is that weak lungs resist death as long as they do s” “But you have not told us how you would treat such cases.” “No, but I will. The lungs are only diseased as an effect of this acid, or kidney poison, in the blood. After having exhausted all authorized remedies to correct this acid condition, I was compelled, in justice to my patients, to use Warner's Safe Cure: though a proprietary remedy, it is now recognized, I see, by leading physicians, by Presidents of State Boards of Health, and by insurance physicians, as a scientific and the only specific for those great organs in which over ninety per cent. of diseases originate or are sustained.” “Is this form of treatment successful ?” “It is wonderfully so, and for that reason I am only too willing that you should announce it to the world of consumptives.”

The above interview came from H. H. Warner & Co., Rochester, N.Y., with the request that we publish it. In a foot-note they say:

“The experience of Dr. Clark is not strange to us. In our correspondence we have found that many thousands of people are suffering from what they think is Consumption, whereas the real difficulty is with the liver and kidneys, proven by the fact that when these organs are restored to health by the use of Warner's Safe Cure, the consumption disappears, and so does uraemic or kidney poisoning, which causes so many symptoms of diseases that the human system is subject to. The same may be said of rheumatism, caused by an acid condition of the system. We insist upon what we always have claimed, if you remove the cause, the system will soon perfect the work already begun. Mrs. Rev. Dr. Theodore Wolf, of Gettysburg, Pa., wife of the editor of the Lutheran Quarterly, said her friends thought her “far gone with Consumption,’ but after a thorough treatment with Warner's Safe Cure, she says, “I am perfectly well.” We can cite thousands of such cases, but one is enough. If you publish the above article, kindly send us a marked copy.”

If any one can in any way stay the ravages of Consumption, which carries away so many millions yearly, it is their bounden duty so to do.

THE FRITSCHE EWER. This superb piece of carved glass, the finest specimen of the So-called “FOCEX CERYSTAL WOREX ’’ that has ever been eacecuted, is on

view at the establishment of

THEODORE B. STARR, JEWELER, 206 Fifth Ave., Madison Square, N. Y.

A CLEAR COMPLEXION |

Cleveland (Ohio). A lady writes: “My skin is improving nicely, and I have been more generally well than in years since using Dr. Campbell's Arsenic Wafers; splendid appetite, and sleep soundly every

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