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Wol. XX. —No. 45. Copyright, 1887, by HARPER & Brothers.

THE FINE PART OF A LADY.

HE ebb and flow of each generation may bring certain customs, and lay the foundation for what in time will be the tradition of its period, but neither fashion, custom, nor sentiment can alter the elements which in a woman's nature qualify her to perform that finest part in life which is a lady's, using the term in its most ennobling sense. We recognize her in every century and under all circumstances; we know her by her sense of the fitness of things and her instinctive good-breeding, whether she wears the dress of Queen Esther, the garb of Ruth during her days of “sweet following,” of an Elizabeth, Queen of Hungary, the sober colors of an

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5,

this. Noblesse oblige, say we. The true woman's part in life is to make those around her happier and better, and how is it to be done if there lingers any prejudice against natural kindliness and sympathy with one's fellow-beings? Many a yoke of depression, many an hour of care, have been made easy to endure because of one little word spoken, one friendly look, or one gentle touch of sympathy. And do these things cost time or money? Do they shut one out even from the fashionable pleasures of the day? On the contrary, do they not serve to dignify what might otherwise be only trivial? We know of some who consider a certain silence as the most “elegant” manner in society—a silence which can mean

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stances, a lady will remember her guest or guests first, and if she does not, Spanish fashion, lay her house and all her personal property at his or her feet, she must lay there her sympathies, her quickest comprehension, her most genial manner, and the kindest impulses of her heart—must, that is, if she does her part, and must. most certainly, if she desires the best kind of popularity. She must remember that in this world no two people are alike, and from no two can we expect just the same amount of good-humor, alertness, delicacy, or, to be general, savoir faire, but all these deficiencies in some can be made up by the large-hearted kindliness which distinguishes others, and this our ideal lady must have. And another element in that fine, sweet compo

Elizabeth Fry, or the cornette of a Soeur Rosalie; and we know her as promptly and as surely when we meet her in unheroic fashion, or undistinguished by any of the loftier virtues and abilities which marked those women of abiding name; we know her, whatever her dress or rank, when she smiles genially as she performs some kindly service for a stranger, when she seeks out the forgotten or depressed member of a company to give him good cheer, when she bestows a favor, and, above all, when she accepts one; and if she be all her title should imply, then, rich or poor, high or low, does she right royally deserve to have those familiar lines apply to her— “A perfect woman, nobly planned,

To warn, to comfort, and command.”

Fashion may adorn her outwardly, add to her natural graces some external charm, but it never can enslave her, because primarily, essentially, instinctively, she is natural. There seems to be in the minds of most young people launching forth into society to-day an idea that a certain manner is necessary if one would be “good form.” Just as the girl of the period has learned to hold her shoulders squarely and straight, to dress in tailor-made gowns, and cultivate a fondness for out-of-door sports, so she seems to think that her dignity is imperilled by being frank and gracious, and above all kindly, in manner. She expresses her opinions freely enough in her own “set.” She can laugh and talk and smile and bow where she feels sure of her audience; but would she voluntarily turn to someless prosperous sister to make her feel welcome and - happy and at her ease in a company of comparative strangers? Would she think it worth her while, or indeed even “proper,” to answer the petition of a little street Arab with a kindly word in a gentle tone? Would she thank the servant who rendered her some passing service? Would she give a word of sympathy here, a word of good cheer there? Would she as hostess make her table or her drawing-room bright and happy for all her guests, diffusing the charm of kindness, which is the root of all graciousness, and make of her slightest hospitality something for which her family and friends were happier and better? And yet all of these things suggest the true part of a lady—the lady as opposed to the lower-bred woman, the woman without kindness, graciousness, or tact. Standing hour after hour at her receptions, the first lady in our iand has won all hearts by the uniformity of her kindliness, for every one the genial look and pleasant word, for each outstretched hand the same kindly pressure; and there need be no hypocrisy in

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Fig. 1–Plush CoAT-Front.—[For Back, see Page 761.] For pattern and description see Supplement, No. VII., Figs. 51–57.

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For description see Supplement.

anything, from a downright insult to an intimation that one is bored unless by the very choicest flowers of speech—a silence that can make timid souls shrink into themselves and bolder ones grow weary; and there are others who, to use an expression wafted to us recently from a group at a lawn party, “freeze out” undesirable members in a company not in “their set”—for example, by talking over their heads, or discussing subjects of which the stranger knows nothing. And can anything be more ill-bred than this mo: nopoly of topics? Conversation in a mixed company should always be inclusive; never make references which leave some people out in the cold. And on all occasions, independent of circum

Fig. 2.-Vicuña Cloth Costume. Fig. 3–Turred Wool, MANTLE-IFor pattern - and description see Suppl., No. VI., Figs. 42–50.]

sition of hers—that thing called “temperament,” which is really native kindness and truth—is to be above suspecting others of mean motives, or to be the cause of spreading a scandal. A lady's part shuts all this out. She cannot, it is true, be foolishly credulous or sympathetic, but she can be, nay, she must be, temperate, merciful, and just, and if by her means one scandal ceases, one human being is raised from a cloud of misapprehension, her part has not been an idle or a thankless one, and in pronouncing other hearts and lives clear, she purifies and strengthens her own. There are downright practical bits of “business” for her, too. She has, or ought to have, a kingdom within herself, out of which she brings order and comfort and propriety to those about her. Before all things she should seek to keep her “house in order,” letting charitable enterprises that demand executive talent take only the overflow of her abilities. Her place is among her own, and to them are her first and freshest moments owing. But there is a current of actual charitable work through all this broader stream of domestic life, whether it flows in tiny == ----------- channels, sending only - words and looks rippling across its surface, or broadens with some good impressive and encouraging example. We have known women undertaking this fine part of a lady who could not treat well those whom they employed for money. Such a one engages a governess for her children. Straightway the fact of their relative positions gives the employer a sense that the other woman must be an inferior. “It is only the governess,” she will say, forgetting that she ought not to place her children under the educational care and influence of a woman she regards as beneath her and them. “Those sort of people are this, that, and the other,” will this sham aristocrat say, relegating the paid teacher to a lower stratum where sensitive. ness is unknown. On the other hand, the employée who is not instinctively a lady flounders about helplessly in her position of hireling. She expects slights, consequently receives them. She lacks tact and a large-minded simple graciousness, such as belong to the lady, no matter what her position, and accordingly she considers a sort of resentful hauteur the equivalent for good manners, the shutting up of her sweetest sympathies the most dignified attitude, while she resents what is often meant for kindliness on her employer's part as patronage, thereby losing the chance of creating that most desirable of all gifts of the gods, a true friend. Volumes might be written on the same subject, yet after all the thing resolves itself into something very simple. Whether you wear

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NEW YORK FASHIONS.
FURS.
SEAL-SKIN GARMENTS.

M*. new features are seen in fur garments

this season, both in their designs and in the arrangement of their trimmings. The popular seal sacque is not changed from last year's perfected shape, with its-double-breasted front, fitted back, coat sleeves, shawl collar, and even length of from forty to forty-five inches; but the novelties are seen in the seal jackets, which are fitted with all the precision of tailor-made cloth jackets, and in the fur mantles and long cloaks that appear as supple and flowing as the most graceful velvet garments made by the Paris modistes.

SHORT SEAL. JACKETS.

The fashionable short seal jacket for young and middle-aged women to wear with gowns of any color is made in tailor style, closely fitted all around, single-breasted, closed over the tournure, with a high standing collar and coat sleeves, and its average length is twenty-three or twentyfour inches. This is merely hooked in front, and when new is usually without trimming. If trimming is added to make it more dressy, it is usually of the black Persian lamb-skin, put on not as a border, but lengthwise, as in revers down the fronts, with also a high Persian collar, pointed cuffs, and pointed epaulets of the glossy black fur. Another seal jacket opens over a vest of Persian which has two diagonal bands of the seal across it, also slightly full sleeves curving down in deep close mutton-leg cuffs of the Persian. . A deep rounded fichu collar of Persian trims other jackets, leaving a V and high collar of the seal-skin in view ; to correspond with this the sleeves have a fluted or pleated cuff of Persian turned back from the hand. Very jaunty jackets of seal are made shorter in the back and open on the tournure, with pointed fronts, and pockets for the hands, and some of these slope away from the throat down, to show a vest of the natural seal in its light undyed color. The Beatrice jacket of last year is also still liked, with its straight loose front and short adjusted back.

SEAL MANTLES, VISITES, ETC.

Sling-sleeve mantles of seal-skin are very stylish short wraps, and are made sufficiently warm for midwinter by a close jacket front, which appears like a vest under the turned-up fronts of the cape. The back is closely fitted, like a basque, with large box pleats on the tournure held in place by a belt inside, and the collar is high and warm. Trimming is not added to these short wraps, as it would make them look clumsy. Other very graceful scarf-like mantles of seal-skin are merely elbow capes in the back, with long slender mantilla fronts trimmed up their outer edges with black Persian bands that extend over the shoulders and down the back. The visite, with its short back, square sleeves, and long pointed front, remains the most generally popular of all fur wraps, and is especially liked for stout figures, as it conceals their outlines, and adds nothing to the apparent size. These wraps may be worn plain, but, unlike the garments mentioned above, their beauty is enhanced by trimmings arranged in a border, or with tail fringe, instead of the lengthwise trimmings now fashionable. For such garments black marten remains the popular trimming; Persian and natural beaver are used for short-pile furs, Sable and mink for brown trimmings, and the long fleeces for fluffy borders, such as black fox, blue fox, lynx, bear, and wolverene.

LONG RUSSIAN COATS, DOLMANS, ETC.

For long cloaks of seal-skin, covering the wearer from throat to foot, the elegant choice for a tightfitted garment is the Russian coat. This greatcoat is double-breasted, with bell sleeves, and is open up the skirt in the back; its special feature is its large collar, rolling up by the ears, with the chin sinking in the long fleece of silver-fox, seaotter, Russian sable, or other rich fur used for the trimming. This distinguished garment is a shape in great favor for opera cloaks of fawn or blue plush, with the great collar and lining of white crinkled Chinese lamb-skin. Similar coats for carriage use are of dark green, blue, or terracotta cloth or plush trimmed with black caracal fur —the long-waved fur formerly called Astrakhan, or Russian lamb, which is revived by Paris and London cloak-makers. Plainer long close coats of seal-skin, known as ulsters, have an “over cape” covering their coat sleeves, beginning in the side forms of the back, crossing to the front, and falling open there; these are not trimmed. The dashing Newmarkets of seal-skin are long fitted coats favored by young ladies; they are doublebreasted, are fastened only as low as the waist, are open below in front and back, and have a collar and cuffs of sable or other rich fur. Long easy-fitting dolmans with great fulness in the back of the skirt or else opened up the back are made more comfortable by new arrangements of their sleeves, giving the arms greater freedom. These have square or pointed sleeves, are doublebreasted, and are very widely bordered across the foot with contrasting fur; these, like the visites, are becoming alike to stout and slender figures.

BLACK PERSIAN AND OTHER FUR GARMENTS.

Black Persian lamb-skin, more glossy and wavy than the closely curled Astrakhan fur, is made up in many of the designs in vogue for seal-skin, such as short fitted jackets, the loose-fronted jackets, visites, and long ulsters. These black wraps are worn with colored dresses that are trimmed with the black fur, and indeed without such trimmings as black jackets and black hats are now considered good style with dresses of almost any color. The black Persian and dull Astrakhan are also liked for those who dress in mourning. Prettily spotted fawn-skins are made

in jackets for coaching and for cold-weather hunting. Leopard-skins are also made into jackets, sling-sleeve capes, and pelerines, and there are odd jackets of the light tan-colored undyed seal and of natural beaver. Fur-lined garments are now almost confined to circulars of Sicilienne lined with mink, or with squirrel skins for extra wraps when driving or travelling. Chinchilla linings are used in evening cloaks of plush made up in gathered circulars like those worn by Irish peasants. There are also Astrakhan linings in circulars of black camel's-hair or crape cloth or dull Sicilienne for old ladies, and for those wearing mourning. FUR CAPES.

Fur capes, or pelerines, covering the shoulders well and reaching to the waist line, are in great favor with young ladies, who wear them now with almost any dress, and, as English women do, in

almost any season. They have been used for coaching throughout the autumn, for walking,

driving, and for evening toilette, black monkey capes with black lace dresses being considered very English, and those of seal-skin completing theatre toilettes of light silk, or being worn even with white muslin or veiling gowns. Deep cuffs have been introduced to match these capes, and a small muff is added. Those most used are of natural beaver, Persian lamb, black marten, lynx, black fox, caracal, and the gray Australian opossum, a shaded soft fur just become fashionable in London.

BOAS, COLLARS, AND MUFFS.

Long round boas reaching nearly to the foot are fashionable extra pieces of fur, and with a muff to match are chosen as a “set of fur” to wear with any dress, or else to match the trimming of a special costume. Jackets and long cloaks are trimmed with a roll of fur set down the front and around the neck to represent a boa. Long fluffy furs are chosen for boas, though the richest of all boas are of the Russian sable, and the dark brown mink that so closely imitates sable. The stylish light boas are of natural lynx, the yellowish badger, silver-fox, gray fox, and chinchilla, while those of dark colors are the brown and black bear, black fox, black lynx, and black marten. Muffs are slightly larger, and are quite plain and round, or else they are soft, very nearly flat, and trimmed with ribbon. Fur collars or collarettes are deep and round, with square-cornered fronts like stoles, or else they are pointed low on the bust. A high standing collar is added to collarettes, and young girls wear merely a straight band for a fur collar, sometimes lapping it on the left side, and ornamenting it with a small head of the animal, or with tail tips. All the fox furs, Persian, beaver, and seal, are popular in these small pieces.

FUR TRIMMINGS.

Fur trimmings are arranged in wide borders on the foot of skirts of cloth and velvet gowns, and in still wider borders on long cloaks. The fancy for lengthwise trimmings on jackets extends to those of cloth as well as of seal-skin, borders being reserved for long garments, and indeed many prefer long cloaks trimmed down the front and back instead of in a border across the foot, which detracts from the apparent height. Pipings or edgings of fur, making sometimes a small roll like a binding, are used in short furs such as beaver, seal, and Persian lamb-skin. Russian sable is the costly brown fur chosen by the rich; very pretty brown effects are given in mink by having rows of the dark tails crossing a wide border, or else the dark stripe on the back of the animal passes down the middle of a band of the four-inch trimming width. The new wolverene also comes in brown sable shades, and is very durable for trimming muffs, boas, etc. The oldfashioned stone-marten is again a fashionable brown fur, and natural plucked beaver is still used, notwithstanding its many rivals.

Strong and showy trimmings for large garments are borders of the black bear, or of the lighter brown bears. Imported wraps and tailor gowns are trimmed with black caracal, the glossy fleece with large waves formerly called Astrakhan, and once in vogue for sacques; this rivals the Persian lamb-skin with its smaller waves and shorter fleece. The genuine Astrakhan, closely curled and without lustre, is especially liked for trimming mourning garments. The revived caracal

is originally of dark brown shades, and is shown

thus as trimmings, muff, cape, or boa. The fox furs, blue, gray, silver, black, and the cross fox, all remain in fashion, also the various black furs with long fleece, such as lynx and black marten; colored beavers are less used than formerly. The raccoon is a showy, light, and inexpensive fur, and the prettily shaded skins of the gray Austra. lian opossum are now much used. Krimmer (or gray Astrakhan), chinchilla, and otter, also spotted leopard borders, are chosen alike for ladies

and children's wraps. Wests, waistcoats, plas

trons, and revers of the short-fleeced furs are on many winter garments, and entire lower skirts of furs are among the midwinter luxuries for gowns of cloth and velvet. White fox and the crinkled Chinese lamb-skin (called also mandarin lamb) trim evening cloaks and the white cloaks worn by children. Brown furs, especially natural plucked beaver and brook otter, are also handsome on children's white cloaks. Tail trimmings like fringe are fashionable in the dark furs for edging visites and other mantles of fur, plush, velvet, or cloth.

TURBANS, HATS, AND HOODS.

New turbans of seal-skin for ladies are high slender crowns, flat on the narrow top and edged below with contrasting fur, such as otter or caracal. Other broader turbans have either square or broad crowns with brims half their height, rolled closely, and these may be trimmed with quills, wings, a bird's head, or loops of ribbon.

The fur hats have tapering crowns with wider brims than those of last year, turned up alike on the sides, or else rolled higher on the left. Miniature heads of fur-bearing animals, also their paws and tails, are the trimmings. Hoods for sleighing and winter travelling are in close warm shapes with soft round crown and short cape covering the neck well; they are made of seal or Persian lamb-skin bordered with a contrasting fur, Russian sable, otter, or chinchilla, and are daintily lined with satin.

FASHIONABLE MILLINKRY.

London styles are followed in the round hats which young ladies now wear both for dress and on quiet occasions. A charming novelty is a small Turkish cap of cloth arranged in many graceful irregular folds forming a crown without a brim, and pointing upward on one side in front, with only some small wings for trimming. This is worn to match tailor gowns or in contrast with their colors, or in one of the colors of the bars of a plaid gown, and it is also made of velvet for dressy hats. Shopping hats are low turbans of cloth with a plush or fur brim and an Alsacian bow of ribbon; this is pretty of bright red cloth with black plush border and a black gros grain ribbon bow in which one or two black quills are thrust. More quiet colored cloths are used for these turbans to match travelling dresses. Furtrimmed turbans of embroidered felt or cloth have two tiny heads of the furry animals directly in front between upright points of the cloth, while the brim is covered with the backs of the animal, and its slender tail comes up over the back of the crown for trimming. Arranging all the trimming highest at the back of the crown is in great favor for these small hats, and indeed for large hats as well; this is done with bows of changeable ribbon, with quills or long pins, or perhaps both, thrust through them, or else slender pointed wings are placed high behind. The changeable velvets are chosen for very dressy round hats, and are shown with soft Scotch crowns entirely without a frame, lined only with thin silk, but forming very full graceful folds gathered up to the left in front above a slightly rolled brim of fur. This, in beautiful green and red chameleon velvet, with black Persian brim and black moiré bows, is called the Thistle, while near it is a trim, trig little toque of cloth folded taut over the frame, with some sail-like wings or slender quills for trimming, and this is labelled the Volunteer. Larger hats of black felt have most becoming full soft puffing of velvet inside the brim near the face in some light color, or in two colors changeable, with all the trimming of black moiré ribbon coming up from the back and massed in high loops on top of the crown.

As we have already said, black hats (like black wraps) are worn with gowns of any color, both in close small shapes of cloth or felt for general wear, and in larger graceful shapes of velvet for dress. These large hats have wider brims, but their crowns are low, and are not greatly heightened by trimming. A point or peak as if pinched there is in front of some of the wide-brimmed hats, and these have for trimming bows coming from the back made of the black moiré ribbon, which is the fashionable trimming of the season, being used not alone on black hats, but on those of colored velvet, even in the delicate opalescent tints that are made up as dress and evening bonIletS.

Small pokes of velvet or cloth are the stringless bonnets worn by both young and elderly women. There are also larger pokes of changeable velvet, with rounded cabriolet fronts plainly faced with velvet of contrasting color, and trimmed with changeable moiré ribbon coming up on the back of the crown in loops and hanging in long streamers low behind. These streamers are also seen in many other bonnets, and are one of the features of the season's trimming. Felt made to imitate straw braid is another novelty for bonnets and round hats. Fur trimmings on close-shaped bonnets are arranged in two lengthwise bands on

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not far from the Post-office, but it is in the light and airy top rooms of the building that Mr. BURGESs does his work; not only for the sake of the light and air were these rooms chosen, but on account of their privacy. Mr. BURGESS has great trouble to keep the plans of his boats from becoming known to the public. In future contracts with builders he intends to insert a clause providing for a forfeiture of money in case the plans are given for publication or perinitted to be copied. —It is Bhet HARTE and not Mark Twain who is stopping at Buckenham Hall, Norwich, England. EDMUND YATEs cabled over the story that Mr. CLEMENs had taken this place for the winter, and that he was spending his time entertaining guests and editing a Jibrary of wit and humor; but it was all a mistake, for Mr. CLEMENS is in Hartford, and has no thought of spending the winter abroad. —RobekT BARRETT BIRow NING, the son of the poet, was married recently to Miss FANNY CodINGTON, an American lady. The wedding was a quiet one, and after it was over the guests were entertained by the bride's cousin, Mrs. SchLEsINGER, of Harkwell Place, London. The bride and groom have gone to Italy for their liviney

moon, and it is believed that later they will visit the United States. Young BRowNING is an artist with the chisel as well as the brush, but it is as a painter that he is best known. He paints poetical subjects in heroic style, and shows a good deal of imagination in his compositions. –Dr. CHARLES MACKAY, the author of “Baby Mine,” writes to the London Athenaeum to comiplain that he never received any compensation, honorary or pecuniary, for his words, although when set to music 200,000 copies and upward Were sold in the United States. –J. H. Rhodes, one of the trustees of the Garfield Memorial Fund, says that they have adopted the plan of asking ten cents from each person desiring to be slown over the memorial, which goes toward keeping a guard over the place. Already the hand of the vandal may be traced on the walls of this memorial, and sometling had to be done or it would be destroyed. —Mrs. Joseph TEvy MAN, of Chicago, is trying to build a free kindergarten in connection witli the Lakeside Sanitarium, on the plan, suggested by Rev. E. E. HALE, of raising the money by ten-cent subscriptions. —Mrs. PARKER, the wife of the Rev. Joseph PARKER, is said to be a good musician, and is a pupil of RANDEGGER, of London, and for some time, led the singing in the choir of her husband's church. §: is tall and robust, with brown hair, blue eyes, and white teeth, and has frank, engaging manners. r. O. W. #. says of General CHARLES J. PAINE, of the Volunteer—who, by-the-way, is his kinsman—that he is the only commander he ever heard of who made himself illustrious by running away from the enemy. −Although France and England are only separated by the Channel, they are as wide apart in manners and customs as though the ocean raged between them. In nothing is this more conspicuous than their eating. T A French woman's breakfast consists of a cup of café au lait and a roll. Queen Victori A, according to a recent chronicler, sits down to a breakfast-table laden with Scotch porridge, cold rump-steak pie, hot rump steak, cold rump steak, cold gammon of bacon, boiled eggs, Scotch scones, brown-bread, butter, honey, tea, coffee, and a kind of cocoa specially prepared for her Majesty. —The body of AUDUBON, the naturalist, has been taken from its vault in Trinity Cemetery, New York, and will be laid at the head of a new avenue to bear his name, the place to be marked by a fine monument. Professor D. S. MARTIN, Dr. BRITToN, and Professor Eggleston, of Columbia, have the arrangements in hand. —Lady ANNIE BRAssey, who died September 14th, on board her husband's yacht the Sunbeam (which her pen has rendered famous), of a fever, while on her way to Australia, and was buried at sea, was a woman of varied accomplishments. She was us good a horsewoman as slie was a

sailor, and a charming hostess withal. During the intervals of her yachting cruises with her hus

band she gathered a brilliant circle of prominent politicians, authors, and artists about her at her country house, Normanlıurst Court, in Sussex, and her house in Park Lane, where her receptions during Lord BRASSEY's long career in Parliament were marked features of the London season. She took a lively interest in philanthropic works, and was made a Dame Chevalière of the Order of St. John for the services rendered by her to the St. Jolin Ambulance Association. —Mrs. CLEVELAND makes it a point to go to church every Sunday, and she always walks when it is possible. Slie has a sentiment on the subject, so her sriends say, and she indulges it. —Ex-President HAYES devotes a large share

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stage. Miss ABBOTT, who happened to be in .

the church, arose in her pew and answered the preacher back, to his no little astonishment, and to the delight of his congregation. The neighboring town of Chattanooga has shown its appreciation of Miss ABBOTT's action by presenting her with a solid silver yacht. No doubt the spirit of the testimonial was of the best; but wherein is the appropriateness of a yacht, except that the subject is one at present uppermost? —Miss CLEVELAND, the President's sister, has been regularly installed as teacher of the higher branches of history in Mrs. SYLVANUs REED's school, in New York. Miss CLEveLAND is more than a teacher, she is a partner in the business with Mrs. REED, and if that lady retires, will succeed to the entire control of the school. As Mrs. REED has made a fortune out of her school, Miss CLEVELAND is to be congratulated. It is said that no woman off the stage has ever been paid as large a salary as Miss CLEVELAND will draw in her new position,

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Silk And Wool Combination Toilette

- - - - STRIPED AND PLAIN Wool Costume. For diagram and description see Supplement. WoRk or Scrap Basket. s

For diagram and description see Supplement.

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cloths shown in this illustration, one of plain cream-colored linen with graceful corner designs embroidered in long stitch, the other of linen damask with a canvas-woven border in which a conventional border design is worked in cross stitch with colored Harris (linen) embroidery thread. The fullsized outline design for Fig. 1 is given in Fig. 58 on the pattern-sheet Supplement. The entire design is outlined with terracotta linen thread in stem stitch; the veining in stem stitch and the seeding of French knots are worked in olive green and terracotta thread, and the cornucopia is filled in long stitch and with lines of feather - stitching, both worked in white linen thread. The cloth has a narrow drawn border which is hemstitched, and the edge is finished with a frill of colored Smyrna lace. Fig. 3 gives the working pattern for the border of the damask cloth, Fig. 2, together with a list of the colors which the symbols represent. Instead of the border Fig. 3, that given in Fig. 4 might be used. This is worked in cross stitch for the solid parts, with all the outlines of the figures defined in Holbein stitch of

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PLUSH CoAT.—BACK.—[For Front, see Front Page.]

For pattern and description see Supplement, No. VII., Figs, 51–57.

Monogram For MARKING LINEN. CRoss STITCH.

plement.

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Monogram For MARKING LINEN.—Cross Stitch.

another color. It may be executed in the Russian red and blue of more or less pronounced tones, or in the more neutral cinnamon red, olive, and brown tints. This cloth has a deep fringe with a knotted heading.

Fig. 5.-CAsh MERE Costume. Back—[See Fig. 1.] For pattern and description see Supplement, No. I., Figs. 1-9.

The Teacup,

HILE alcoholic stimulants have been given more largely to the use of the masculine portion of our race, the seminine portion has contented itself with tea, and has had to undergo a good deal of reviling, and of assurance that there is death in the pot, in consequence. It is told them that tea is only to be had in an adulterated condition; that it is dyed, and poisoned, and made over from the tea leaves of the original drinkers. As yet all this has made no difference with the women who depend upon the herb. They will not believe that all the tea grown on all the miles of the Chinese tea farms has to be adulterated, or that enough is used there to make its redrying and coloring worth while. It is told them also that it produces painful excitement and wakefulness, when taken in quantity, from which comes painful reaction, that it acts like tannin in the stomach, that it produces theism— whatever that production may be— and that the professional tea-taster, who does not even swallow the tea he tastes, is always sooner or later ruined physically by

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