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WALKING SUIT AND RIDING-HABIT-ISEE PAGE 779.

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she was in the habit of giving him for the same pieces, inquired of the meat merchant his reason for this. The reply was cool and unabashed: “I merely thought, madam, that you were better able to pay two cents more in the pound. But”— condescendingly—“if you really object to doing so, I will charge you only the same I do others.” It is needless to say that that butcher lost one customer forthwith. In view of such occurrences as these, the bills should be watched closely and paid weekly. Allowing them to run longer furnishes more opportunity for cheating. If the tradesman gives any cause to be suspected of trickery, it is wise either to pay as you go, or else in his presence to make a note of the amount of meat bought and of the price charged for it. With a grocer the same plan should be pursued or a pass-book used. Most women have a delicacy about seeming to doubt the honesty of shopmen, which is often quite thrown away upon those with whom they have to deal. In any occasion it is unnecessary to show suspicion, but merely to express a preference for the ready-money system. In preparing for going to market it is always wise to make out one's memorandum before quitting the house. Trouble and confusion are thus saved, as well as the danger of purchasing for meals already provided. A list should be written of all the groceries that will be required during the day, that the trouble of sending out for them in a hurry may be saved. If the cook's memory is defective, it may be supplemented by a slate or small black-board hung in the kitchen. Upon this she may jot down a memorandum of anything that may be needed as soon as she discovers that the supply is exhausted. * - " -The advice given by various house-keeping writers to purchase meat at large markets, like Fulton or Washington markets, in New York, is excellent—when it can be followed. There are householders who make all their purchases for the ensuing week on Saturday night, sallying forth laden with a huge market basket, which they bring home packed. These supplies, stored in a good cellar or refrigerator, keep perfectly in cold weather, and money is saved to an appreciable degree by pursuing this course. But in many cases such a plan is impossible, either from the absence of large markets in the vicinity, or because of the inability of the house-keeper to provide means of transportation without increasing the cost of the provisions to what they would be bought in small amounts. Often want of space in which to keep the eatables after they are at home is the drawback. Under such circumstances all that one can do is to economize by skilfully buying and cook1I] go. TA certain amount of knowledge that cannot be taught by books must be acquired before one can market judiciously. Only experience can inform one whether fish, meat, and vegetables are in good condition instead of stale and unwholesome. Such general rules may be laid down as that the eyes and scales will be bright if a fish is fresh, that vegetables must not be wilted or flabby in texture, that beef must be bright red, with white veins and marble-like fat, mutton dark in color, and veal light. However valuable such instructions may be as hints, they give the tyro less help than will a few weeks’ regular daily marketing, aided by close observation.

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supple as cashmere; hence it is excellent for drapery, and is used as over-skirts on lower skirts of plain cloth. A gay youthful gown is of blue and red changeable cloth draped on a skirt of bright red cloth, and there is also a red vest in the shot cloth basque. Embroidery of silk cords done on the red vest and skirt is in the shades of the darker changeable fabric, and the scallops at the foot rest on a border of natural beaver fur. Another novelty is twilled wool with a fleecy selvage two or three inches wide, which serves as trimming for the dress, edging the over-skirt, and forming a border around the lower skirt. This selvage is on plain and on changeable cloths, and is sometimes of a contrasting color; for instance, a gray fleecy selvage on a red and gray shot twill is around the deep apron over-skirt, and also heads a border of seal fur which is on the lower skirt; the basque has the fleecy band sewed down its fronts, opening on a narrow vest bound with seal-skin. Palm-figured woollens are also used for lower skirts of gowns that have plain twilled fabrics for the upper part. These large palm leaves have the effect of embroidery, and the skirt is made up very simply to display the figures, being very full and straight all around, or else mounted in the round pleats called organ-pipe pleats.

PLUSH SKIRTS.

Plush fabrics in stripes and large figures are revived for the skirts of cloth and of silk dresses. These have stripes of contrasting colors, or large balls or shaded spots, or else they are mottled to imitate the skins of beasts, the leopard and tiger skins giving beautiful golden brown hues. The fashionable green cloths are very effective over a skirt of leopard plush, and wide bands of this prettily marked plush trim wraps and gowns of darker brown and terra-cotta cloths.

LIGHT TRIMMINGS. Trimmings lighter than the fabric of the gown

are a feature of new toilettes seen especially in passementeries of silk cords or of shaded beads. For instance, an elaborate garniture of iridescent beads and of the crystal beads with gold centres is put on black net dresses, covering the collar, forming epaulettes and a point in front and back. Then Suede-colored cord gimps in vine and leaf patterns are on dark drab camel's-hair or seal brown cloth dresses, being put around the skirts in two rows, and forming a vest by many lengthwise pointed rows. The open-patterned galloons, though made of black or dark cords or beads, are lightened by being placed over light silk, bright red, or fawn, or blue, matching part of the dress, but usually in direct contrast to the trimming. Gilt cords and passementerie on black silk and velvet dresses also carry out this caprice, which is offered as a rival for the very prevalent fancy for black trimmings on bright-hued cloths.

Sleeves of different fabric from the corsage are seen on cloth and silk gowns, velvet being used for the sleeves to match the vest and lower skirt. This requires a plain fabric usually for the combination, yet figured stuffs are occasionally seen in the sleeves when used for the petticoat. A good model has a Louis Quatorze basque of brown cloth with brown velvet coat sleeves, vest, and petticoat. The coat-basque is long and square around the sides and back, and is striped lengthwise from the waist line to the end with rows of gold galloon, and slopes open on a pointed vest of velvet, with velvet sleeves and collar. A pointed gold galloon girdle edges the vest, and is tied with a bow. The velvet lower skirt is without trimming, but is set on the foundation skirt very full to give the effect of a full plain round skirt. The cloth over-skirt hangs in flat pleats down the middle of the front and back, and is pointed deeply before and behind, but is very short on the sides.

BROCADES.

Three fabrics are employed in many rich costumes, and among these brocades are used in combination with repped silk and velvet. These brocades have satin figures sunk in repped grounds, in striped designs usually, or else they are rich matelassé fabrics which come in Persian patterns, with many dark gold and copper-colored figures on black or brown grounds. The brocaded silk and satin goods form the full breadths on the back of the skirt, the velvet is on the foot and up the sides, while the soft Bengaline forms short draperies on the hips and pointed wings on the sides. Other brocades of rich silk have designs like soutache braiding in a lighter color on a dark ground; these are liked for combining with cloth draperies and trimming with the lighter passementeries mentioned above. There are also very stately trained dresses made of the brocades that have but one broad figure in each breadth, and these rich fabrics are used in very handsome tea gowns. Long flowing lines are given to the skirts of these fabrics, their trimmings being flat passementeries of beads and open cut-work of velvet with beads. Indeed, the tendency is toward closer outlines for many gowns, the exaggerated tournures that came out abruptly below the waist line being abandoned for those that slope more gradually, and are more slenderly bouffant when tied back.

TEA. JACKETS AND GOWNS.

Tea jackets or matinée Sacques are charming garments, made of soft surah or India silks, trimmed with much gold embroidery and with lace. Some of them have blouse fronts with jacket backs, and are made of the silk pleatéd throughout in pressed accordion pleats sewed to shoulder bands of the silk, and held by a girdle in front; this is lovely in robin's-egg blue silk with gold cording on the shoulders, the turned-over collar, and on the cuffs of the full pleated sleeves. Bright red surah silk jackets with black dotted net and lace are pretty to wear with skirts of the same, or else black skirts of silk or of lace. The dotted net forms the draped front of the corsage, and is also in puffs in the sleeves. Tea gowns sent out from Paris are more closely fashioned than the picturesque gowns worn by English women, for whom these graceful toilettes were first designed. An excellent model of these princesse gowns, as worn by Parisiennes, was given in Bazar No. 44, on page 740, and is repeated here in Bengalines, rich brocades, and in soft woollens of the most exquisite fabrics. Bright red Bengaline with gold galloon and white lace front is a favorite gown for young ladies, while those more elderly use black gowns of the richest brocades.

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Ostrich-feather boas are among the tasteful novelties of the season; they are made of the feathers in their natural shades, or all black, or else black and white together. To wear with them are entire bonnets of the feathers, made to lie flat like fringe, or in small loops in rows. These are in small poke shapes, and when made of black feathers are becomingly faced with a torsade of red or green velvet, which forms a brim; a pompon is added for trimming, with a high aigrette the color of the velvet, and the strings are of black watered ribbon. Fringes of ostrich feathers in single and double rows are also used for edging plush and velvet cloaks for dressy day wear and for evening wraps.

EVENING DRESSES.

Embroidered crêpe lisse in stripes and dots is used in combination with satin, moiré, and Bengaline for evening dresses. Bridal dresses of moiré antique have gathered panels of white lisse on which are large dots of silver, while for bridemaids the white lisse has ribbon stripes of colored moiré embroidered with sprays of white flowers on their hale hlne, rose, or yellow ground. . Large spots are wrought on the newest black and white

nets, and on the colored nets that trim evening dresses of repped silk or brocade. There are also black velvet brocaded stripes on black Spanish laces for trimming black and colored dresses, and white net with gold-wrought stripes for white Satin gowns.

SMALL BOYS' clothes.

The first short dresses put on baby boys are mainsook yoke slips precisely like those made for girls, and these are worn until the child is two years old, when he is put in more boyish-looking dresses of white piqué cut all in one piece, yet simulating a jacket with pleated vest and pleated skirt. These piqué one-piece dresses may be worn until he is five years old, if the mother chooses, but many mothers prefer to put colored dresses on their boys when three years old, especially in the autumn, when warm woollens are to be used. Cashmere and camel's-hair in Gobelin blue, terracotta, and golden brown shades are then made up in one-piece frocks (lined only as far as the hips), with the vest of three box pleats fastening under a revers on the left side, the back either plain or pleated, and the skirt sewed on in box pleats. Rows of black braid are the trimming. A square sailor collar of the material may be added, or else the child wears a wide round linen collar, or one of embroidery in open designs finished with a scalloped frill, scantily gathered. At three years of age well-grown boys also wear a gathered or pleated skirt of cashmere attached to a silesia waist, and above this a short squarecornered jacket matching the skirt, with a wide vest of a contrasting color. This is pretty in blue cashmere with a Suede-colored vest, and either brown or black braid in curled or straight rows around the jacket. It is also liked in red cashmere with a black vest of pleated cashmere, and with black soutache braiding. Black or brown buttoned shoes without heels, and stockings of the color of the shoes are worn by these small boys. At four years of age the kilt suit is donned in all its varieties of materials—cashmere, serge, cloth, velveteen, or velvet, in plain colors, checks, stripes, or plaids. For general wear dark blue Serges or the new striped twills are made with wide kilt pleats and the broad flat front, on which braiding may be set down the sides and at the foot in curled design or in fence rows. The short jacket slopes open from the throat to show a vest cut in one or in two points, and has a narrow braiding border. The Louis Quinze blouses of white muslin are also worn with a similar jacket and kilt skirt (instead of a vest). The Rob Roy plaids in small blocks of black with red make pretty kilt suits for boys of five or six years, while more quiet colors are given in the striped twills and fancy plaids where brown prevails, with some threads of blue and crimson, For dress are black velvet or velveteen kilt suits, and the English fancy is to add a spotted vest of bright scarlet or blue velvet with white or black dots wrought in silk. Caps and overcoats are chosen to match in color. The baby boys wear white outside garments, the cap of cloth or silk in close bonnet shape like a girl's cap, or else a turban of the soft embroidered felt forming a Scotch crown pointed highest on the left side, with a brim of velvet and perhaps a ruche of lace next the face. The walking coat is of white cloth, pleated down the middle of the front and back, with a deep collar and belt of plush or fur, which may be either white or brown. Boys two and a half or three years old wear Turkish caps or turbans of dark cloth or velvet, with the crown dropping over on one side, to be finished there with a tassel. To wear with these are great-coats of cloth, red, blue, or brown, edged with Astrakhan or beaver, and with brandebourgs across the front, also long brown ulsters of plaid rough cloth, with wide collar, capes, or a hood. Pea-jackets are again made of navy blue diagonal cloth that is thick and warm, and are worn over the midshipman suits so long in favor, with sailor caps, which patriotic boys insist shall be labelled Volunteer. For information received thanks are due Mrs. C. DoNow AN; and Messrs. ARNOLD, CoNSTABLE, & Co.; JAMEs McCREERY & Co.; LoRD & TAYLoR; AITKEN, SoN, & Co.; and E. A. MoRRison.

PEIRSONAL.

PROFESSOR MARIA MITCHELL on Commencement Day at Vassar gives a breakfast party in the Dome of her Observatory. The guests are those who have been students in astronomy. After breakfast, which is served on little tables in the Dome and in the Meridian Room, come poems, sonnets, epigrams, and other rhymes, chiefly anonymous, most of them from the pen of Professor Mitchei,L herself. Each student has a rhyme addressed to her, and each student in turn has one for Professor MITCHELL. —TEREsin ATUA, the young violinist, who has just made her début in New York city with so much success, is but twenty years of age. She was born in Turin, of poor but honest parents. At the age of six she made a tour through the south of France, but after that she began the serious study of music, and won the first prize at the Paris Conservatory. Mlle. TUA has a most attractive personality, and has the sympathy of her audience before she pulls the bow across the So I'll loss. —ijr. ANNA Kingford advocates the use of ostrich feathers for ornaments and the imanufacture of ladies' cloaks and boas. There has lately been a decline in ostrich feathers, which from being $300 a pound, now find few who want them at $35, of the best variety. —JULIETTA PERKins, the heiress of MYRA CLARK GAINEs, seems to have inherited the le: gal troubles of that lady. Mrs. GAINES's will disposed of a property worth two and a half millions of dollars, but Miss PERKINs has applied for a receiver, and there seem to be difficulties ahead. —Mrs. E. D. GILLEspie has arranged to hold a festival of the year at Horticultural Hall, at Philadelphia, for the benefit of the School of Industrial Art. Each table will be uamed after

a month, and decorated to correspond. Mrs. GILLESPIE, although a # andmother, is an unusually active woman. There is scarcely a public movement connected with Philadelphia with which she is not conspicuous. She is, it may be remembered, a direct descendant of BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, and on state occasions she wears a miniature of the famous printer and statesman attached to a chain about her neck. —Mlle. MELVA, otherwise Mrs. ARMSTRONG, of Australia, is said to be the coming PATTI. She recently made an appearance in Brussels with great success, and her friends and admirers all predict a brilliant future for her. —President HAYES is said to be looking remarkably well. His step is elastic, his eye is bright, and he wears his beard longer than when he occupied the White House. His daughter FANNY, who was a little girl in those days, is now a bloomi:\g maiden of eighteen, and bears a striking likeness in features and in character to her mother. —Dr. Norvin GREEN, President of the Western Union Telegraph Company, is a native of Kentucky, and has the appearance of a Kentuckian. He is tall and loosely built and thin. He graduated at the Medical Department of the University of Louisville, but has given more attention to telegraphy than to medicine. One of his sons is a graduated physician, but does little or no practising. He is rather a gentleman of leisure, and spends most of his time in Europe. —BENJAMIN HARRIs BREwsTER, of Philadelphia, has given his law library to the University of Pennsylvania as a memorial to the late GEORGE: BIDDEL, a brilliant young lawyer, and who was a son of Professor GEORGE W. BIDDEL, of the University. The library consists of upward of eight thousand volumes, and is said to be one of the best and finest in the country. Mr. Blti-WSTER does not wish it understood that the reason he parts with his library is because lie proposes retiring from his professional duties. —The Rev. JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE, of Boston, took the latc Miss DoROTHEA. L. Dix for the subject of a sermon preached a few Sundays ago. During his sermon he told how once in Scotland, while staying with GEORGE CARE, a phrenologist, Miss Dix tried in vain to make any impression on the Lord Advocate concerning the abuses in the Scotch law in regard to the insane. Finding that the Home Secretary was the highest authority in the matter, she went to London and expounded the case to him in full. He promised that the needed changes in the law should be made. When the Lord Advocate came to London he found the whole matter settled according to her plans. —A novel entertainment was given a short time ago at Newport. It was a dance in the stable on Mrs. GIBERT's estate on Bellevue Avenue. The stalls were adorned with flowers, and transformed into charming little sitting-rooms with rugs on the floors, small tables with lamps, and comfortable chairs. There were flowers in the mangers and flowers on the sides, and bunches of straw tied with ribbons in the corners. There were also flowers in the carriage-house, which was used as the ballroom. Saddles and bridles, tennis nets, balls and bats, bows and arrows and oars, were artistically arranged, and the effect was as picturesque as it was unique. .. —Mrs. E. E. BURNSIDE, M.D., is the first woman to run for an office in Buffalo. She has been nominated for a position in the Board of Education on the Prohibition ticket. Mrs. BURNSIDE is a middle-aged lady of rather slender build, with an unusual face and prematurely gray hair. She is President of the Woman's rollibition Alliance, but disclaims any desire for notoriety. —JAMES Gou DII, of North Evanston, Illinois, claims to have built the first real steam-ship that crossed the Atlantic Ocean. The name of this ship was the stoyal William, and she made her trial trip in the year 1831, but it was not until two years later that, commanded by Captain John McDoug A1, she steamed from Halifax to Liverpool, where she arrived in twenty-five days. Mr. Goudis is nearly eighty years of age, but he is in excellent health, and his wife, who is seventy-five years of age, does all her own work, and plays the piano just as well now as she used to fifty-five years ago, before slie was married. —Rich ARD A. PROCTOR, the astronomer, is said to be a man of very domestic tastes. His present wife, who is his second, is an American lady, and niece of General JEFFERSON THOMPson, of Virginia. Professor PRoctor has recently joined the ranks of naturalized Americans, and is building a perinament residence at Orange Lake, Florida. - —Mrs. TYLEit, who was the first bride of the White House, still lives at Richmond, Virginia, and is now well on to her seventieth year. Her portrait in bridal dress and veil is hanging in the White House, and was the second portrait permitted to lang there. —It is remarked that a number of aristocratic English ladies have taken up different branches of trade for the sake of eking out their incomes. Aristocratic Englishmen have long replenished their pocket - books through the channels of trade, Lord ShkEwsbulty AND TALBOT being one of the most conspicuous of these. His hansom cabs and coal-yards are among the most patronized in London. —The idea that women who take up professions do so to the detriment of their matrimonial chances seems to be exploded. We constantly hear of lady presidents of colleges who marry blushing young Bachelors of Arts; now Miss Pitiscii.i.A. H. BHAisi,IN, Professor of Mathematics at Wassar, is about to wed Mr. TIMOTHY MERRick, a wealthy manufacturer of Holyoke, Massachusetts. Mr. MERRICK is sixty years of age, and has been twice married, and has a faulily of seven children. —Miss JENNIE Hopkins, of the Denver Republican, is said to be the best “newspaper man” in Colorado. According to the accounts written of her slie is an accomplished journalist, but her position is not a unique one. Nearly every New York and Boston daily paper llas one or two young women on its staff, either in the editorial or reportorial departinent. As newspaper correspondents women ate in the ascendeucy, but even in the walks of daily journalism there are any number of them. Those who go about their work in the proper spirit—that is, regardless of sex—are popular among their male associates, and are successful in their profession. The others drop out, and try their hands at something else.

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Embroidery Designs from the Royal School of Art Needle-Work.

Fo 1 of the designs illustrated on this page is a sketch of a beautiful mantel valance of deep crimson plush. The design is of conventional peony, and is solidly worked in silk throughout. The flowers are in pale pink or beautifully shaded white, and the leaves in a variety of olive greens. It is finished off with a heavy fringe. This valance would be very handsome and effective for a large room, as it is wide, and the pattern

Fig. 8.—WALLPOCKET.

design, are also solidly worked in various rich and delicate shades of crewel picked out with silk. An enlarged illustration of this design was given in Bazar No. 42 of the current volume. The colors themselves and the skilful blending of them both serve to mark in no small degree the progress of knowledge and the importance which ornamental art has attained, as the crewels are from time to time specially dyed to meet the requirements of the school. Figs. 3 and 4 are wallpockets of most useful size, which at the same time are strikingly ornamental objects for a morning room. They are of velvet, with a Japanese design in gold thread; the use to which each pocket is put is also worked on it in gold thread. The pockets are made in various colored velvets, so that they may be chosen to match the ornaments of any room by the purchaser. These are some of the latest novelties produced by the inventive brains and fingers of the members of the school. Fig. 5 is a table cover intended to be worked on cloth in crewel brightened with silk, and if desired it may have a little fine Japanese gold used in outlining the flowers. As the flowers are quite conventional the whole design should be worked in shades of one color, or an olive green may be used with blue for the flowers, but the ground must be selected with taste, and be at once neutral and harmonious to suit such treatment. A notched edge of stitches surrounds it. .

is particularly bold in style. It would not be suitable for a small Lantel board, because it would necessitate other ornamental work in the same room being on an equally large scale. The next sketch, Fig. 2, represents a two-panelled screen, which is strikingly beautiful in its design and execution. Here we have a design such as our greatgrandmothers would have delighted to work in the last century. It is Italian in style. The material is biscuit-colored linen, which is mounted in a plain frame of black ebonized wood. The scroll pattern is solidly worked in all manner of harmoniously blended shades of brown and green crewel, the lights only being cleverly pointed by means of a few stitches of silk. The festoons of flowers which hang from the scroll, and the birds which are introduced to lend interest to the

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Fig. 2. —TWO-PANELLED SCREEN.—ITALIAN

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Fig. 1. –MANTEL VALANCE–CONVENTIONAL PEONY DESIGN.

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Slang in Common Use.
THE extent to which slang phrase prevails in conversa-
T tion and in the newspaper prints is a matter for grave
alarm to those who have at heart the purity of the English

tongue.

Slang has always prevailed among illiterate people; the turf, the ring, and even the Money Exchange have long had a phraseology belonging peculiarly to each. But it is only when great newspapers import this slang to their columns, and spread it among millions of readers who are apt to repeat glibly what they see in print, that the purity of the

language is menaced and a protest is in order. Let me enumerate some of the most common of the phrases and state the manner of their use. A person deft in any performance and able to outwit his fellows was said to “take the cake.” The slang-mongers soon tired of this form of the expression, and changed it to “takes the bun.” This did not last either, and the phrase now is, “he takes the cracker.” If a person of a waggish turn tells a story which is manifestly untrue, one of the auditors will stop him by saying, “Come off.” If any explanation is needed the wag will be asked, “What are you giving us?” A great boaster who brags about his exploits, or a brawling fellow, is said to “fire off his mouth.” When a bank director, a treasurer, or a bad alderman

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suddenly starts for Canada and leaves other people's affairs in an unsatisfactory condition, the public is informed the next morning that he has “skipped out.” The ring has some very choice phraseology; and when Paddy Doran gets worsted in a bout with the invincible John L. Sullivan, the newspapers put upon their bulletin - boards that he has been “knocked out.” After the contest is ended Mike Doolan goes to a tavern and “sets up” the drinks for the crowd. You will learn still further from the newspaper report that before the party dispersed several of them “blew out” all their money. A long-winded person deserves to be suppressed, whether by slang or nice speech, and a sentence has been coined for his benefit. It is, “Give us a rest.” The airs of dudes and other languid persons are often very trying, and after one of the tribe has aired himself for an hour or two, and retired, some charitable person will say, “That fellow makes me tired.” This phrase, I think, has some justification. When a young gentleman from the country arrives in town with short trousers and hay seed in his hair, and goes about looking at everything with his mouth, he is said to be “fresh.” The phrase is by courtesy extended to anybody who is forward or presumptuous. If the pretty nurse-girl “makes eyes” in a pronounced way at the dude of the household, he at once declares that she is “fwesh.” Almost everything at present, from a hieroglyph to a sermon, is declared to be a

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