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Passementerie Tassel.

PassFMENTERIE Tassel. - - Half Size. Fig. 1.-FUR-LINED BRocade Cloak. Fig. 2.-Fur-LINEd Cloth Travelling Coat. HALF Size.

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Mechanically induced, without Cotates. harmless, reliable; no discomfort Per- sons troubled, by steeplessNESSA for

pamphlet on this subject addressio-eougene Pearl,'?3"ijnion Square New York.

The best ever made.

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The Outfitting of Boys, Girls, and Babies our specialty.

Considering the Assortment, Styles, and our Low Prices, there is no other place where they can be fitted out as well with everything from HATS to SHOES.

F you reside out of New York City, we can serve you as well by mail. Please mote our plan. A general Catalogue issued once or twice a year has proved so unsatisfactory to describe our goods (at least so unsatisfactory to us) that we have discontinued it. The time necessary for its preparation obliged us to have the matter in the hands of the Engravers and Printers long before all of the styles for the season were ready, so that by the time the book reached our customers our stock contained very many desirable goods not shown in it, and many of the styles prepared early had been sold out; therefore it never represented what we tried to have it represent, i.e., the goods that we had on hand. The result often was disappointment and delay to those ordering from it. We have found it to be much more satisfactory to give special information in answer to each individual inquiry, and that is our present plan. Tell us by mail what you require for your children —giving us some general idea of the colors desired, what the garments are for, etc., just as you would if you called personally at the store—and we will immediately send you samples, illustrations, and full descriptions of our latest styles, suitable for the purpose discribed.—Your letter of to-day will be answered by illustrations and samples of to-day.

We include Youths' and Misses' sizes up to 18 years.

60 and 62 West 23d St., N.Y.

“PARTED BANG”

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DON'T FAIL

TO EXAMINE THE CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENTS OF

SHEPPARD (NAPP & CD,

Sixth Avenue, 13th and 14th streets.

SHOPPTING § No: of all kinds - y a lady of experience, good taste, &c., without charge. Circular ... Address MISS A. BOND, 2804th Ave., N.Y. City.

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Soo in Phila by a Lady of taste and experience. Miss J. E. Massey, 1706 Walnut St., Phila.

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positively cured by the great German Remedy. Sample

G A | A R R package and book for 4 cents

in stamps. E. H. Medical Co., East Bampton, Conn.

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Announce the initial display of Novelties in Thin Fabrics, for evening dresses. An elaborate assortment of Gauzes, Tułles, Silk Mulle, India and Canton Crepes, and Crepe de Chine in white and new delicate tints. The above materials also in stripes and small figures, and with effective designs in silver and gold tinsel. Also, Superior qualities of White Silk Muslin and Gaze Religieuse for Young Ladies’ introductory dresses. EngIish Brilliantines, in white and cream, at 75 cents, $1.00, and $1.25 per yard. Orders by mail, from any part of the country, will receive careful and prompt attention.

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In Seal, Beaver, Lynx, Sable, Bear, doc., at prices GUARANTEED Low ER THAN ANY OTHER House.

The most economical ; it wears to thinness of a wafer.

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JAPANESEDDUBLESKINGUATRUGS 3x6, White and Gray, $2.59; 3x6, Black, $3.75; the very best imported. Prepaid parcels, $5.00 and upward, delivered free of charge within 100 miles of New York City.

6th Avenue and 20th street, N. Y.

st Atex isi, AND - - - * - - - Fancy Dyeing Establishment, BARRETT, NEPHEWS, & CO., 5 AND 7 JoBIN STREET, NEw Yost K5 1199 Broadway, N.Y.; 27.9 Fulton St., Brooklyn;

215 N. charies st, Baltimore; at N. sinst., Phila.

DYE, CLEAN, and REFINISH DRESS GOODS and Garments without ripping. Send for Circular and Price-list.

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Have purchased at a discount of 33% of the stock of a well-known Lyons manufacturer of rich BLACK CA Co EMI. It E SILKs, and offer same at the following low prices: 75 pieces BLACK Giro's FAILLE, 22 inches wide, at 97 c. 5 worth $1.50. 50 pieces BLACK CACHEMIRE, rich finish, at $1.20. 100 pieces BLACK CACHEMIRE, extra-fine grade, at $1.50. 25 pieces BLACK CACHEMIRE, rich lustre and finish, at $2.00. Also, 100 pieces CoI, ORED FAILLE FRANQAISE, at $1.22; worth $1.50. 50 pieces Co Loro ED FAILLE FRANÇAISE, extra heavy, at $1.48; worth $2.00. Fall Catalogue sent on application.

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SHE WAS SO GRATEFUL.

FAIR PATIENT. “Oh, doctor, you've BEEN so ATTENtive to ME!

die, I would certainly Leave You My Body for VI wise CTION."

FA CETIAE. TWO BEAUX TO HER STRING.

Colia. “Why do you encourage attentions from both Tom and Harry?"

IRENE. “Well, dear, I like Tom best, but he is not very well off, and can't afford a coupé if we go to the theatre. I call him “my fine-weather bean.”

Colla. “Then what do you call Harry?”

IRENE. “My rain-bow.”

THE TELEPHONE CAT.

Though most of the cats on the back-yard fence
Belong to the self-same choir,
And faithfully call and caterwaul,
“Maria 1 Maria 1 Maria 1"
There's one that shouts above all the rest,
At any hour that suits him best,
In a strangely human, familiar tone,
As if he called through a telephone,
“Hello! Hello! Hello!”
His voice we have learned to know;
And whenever we hear it we say, “There's that
Detestable nuisance—the telephone cat!” J.

LOOKS THAT WAY.

“How is your son getting along in New York, Mr. Hayseed " “I guess he ain't doin' as well as he says he is. He was home t'other day; an' had on a colored shirt an’ a white collar. I rayther suspect he's behind with his washer-woman.”

A captain on one of the Bay Line steamers, plying between Baltimore and Norfolk, tells the following story of his old stewardess, well known to travellers on that route as “Aunt Koi." It seems that the old wo. man was skilled in making a certain gargle, and one of the passengers being troubled with a sore throat, the captain sent to ask that she would prepare some of her famous remedy for him. Meeting her in the saloon a short time after this request had been made, the captain stopped her to inquire into his friend's condition. “Well, Aunt Maria,” he said, “how do you think Mr. Smith is now on “Well, sah, cap'n,” replied Aunt Maria, setting her arms akimbo, and 199king, cross-eyed, as was her wo, when about to deliver her opinion, “I thinks, sah, dat de apples of his ears is done fell.” The captain declares that to this day he has never discovered what art of !. human anatomy the apples of one's ears are, nor did he nquire into Aunt Maria's meaning, lest the old woman's explanation should involve the matter in even greater obscurity.

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OWERHEARD ON A FERRY-BOAT.

“What is that, mamma 2"
“Liberty Enlightening the World, my dear.”
“Is Liberty always a woman 2"
“Yes, dear.”
“And do women enlighten the world 2"
“Yes, dear.”
-- Oh !”
—-
A NOVEMBER WAIL.

Oh, the roses that daintily busted
Last May, in the breezes now scoot,

And the robin has just exodusted
And tootled his little last toot.

The landscape is pensive and wistful And purple and hazy by turns,

And the maiden sighs over a fistful Of golden-rods, asters, and ferns.

The shoemaker's now waxing soulful, The poet turns hand-springs of grief,

And the bin in the cellar is coalful, And the lard of the piglet's in leaf.

The light on the far hills is touchful,
The corn-bread is yellow and ripe,

And the gun for the rabbit's too muchful,
And the quail plays his Henry Clay pipe.

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Now the darkness is o'er the land creeping, And the pot-pie envelops the bird,

While the flames up the chimney are leaping, And the bark on the brass dogs is heard.

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Oh, the pig in the blazes is crackling,
Or else in the porkhestra squeals,

And, now the old cook is slapjackling,
While the horse eats his daily oat meals.

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All the leaflets are wrinkled and tarnished, And the sweet-Billiam blossoms no more;

All the apples are cut, dried, and varnished— " They’re a mockery right to the core.

Oh, November, November, November,
November, November, Novem.,
You are not quite as cold as December,
But you're always colder than June.
—-

When the baby once gets on his feet he's sure to go ahead.

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TWO OFFERS.

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man. It was a portière of satin, with three suc

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cessive bands or planes of decoration, the centre one being a composition based upon the fleur-delis, over a decorative band of disks, with a flight of sparrows above. It was not only a fine piece of embroidery, but a valuable lesson in American design. During this period of growth various schools of needle-work were formed throughout the country, under the influence and advice of the New York society. Progressive Chicago was, I believe, the first to take this step. Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Detroit, San Francisco, and others followed, and before long every woman of talent in the land could in some way appropriate this means of expression for any artistic feeling or knowledge she might possess. To a few it was precisely the tool needed. Mrs. Holmes, a woman of great artistic ability, had long before this chosen silks and bits of stuff with which to make to herself pictures, using them as a painter uses the colors upon his palette. A stretch of pale blue silk, with outlined hills lying against it, made for her a sky and background, while a middle distance of flossy white stitches, advancing into well-defined daisies, brought the foreground to one's very feet." Flower-laden apple branches against the sky, the reddening leaves and cones of the sumac: in neglected fence corners—all suffered themselves to be expressed, and well expressed, in these materials. In what one may call pictorial art in needlework, Mrs. Weld has also been most happy. Her bits of swampy soil, where the spotted leaves of the adder's-tongue, the yellow water-lily, with its compact balls, and the flaming cardinal-flower are growing, while swamp grasses are nodding above, are as good in their way as any color sketch of them could be, and affect one with the sentiment of the scene, as it is the mission of art to do. Miss Hannah Weld has also from the first been remarkable for her correct and beautiful use of natural forms, while Miss Caroline Townshend, of Albany, Mrs. William Hoyt, of Pelham, and Mrs. Dewey, of New York, have each contributed very largely to the formation of characteristic and progressive needle - work art in America. There are individuals here and there in the West and South who have also, perhaps unknown to themselves, helped in this progress; indeed, I remember many pieces of embroidery loaned for the Bartholdi Exhibition of 1883 which would have done credit to any period of the art, and each piece undoubtedly had its influence. The work of schools or societies has been much less marked by original development. During the ten years of their existence the four largest societies—those of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Chicago—have been under the direction of English teachers, and have followed more or less closely the excellencies of the English school. Even in Boston, where, owing to the decided cultivation of art, and the early introduction of drawing in the public schools, one would have looked for a rather characteristic develop

ment, English designs and methods have been

somewhat closely followed. In attempting to account for this fact one must remember that it is against the nature of associated authority to follow individual or original suggestions. There must be a broad and well-trodden path for committees to walk together in, and the track of the Kensington School is broad and authoritative enough for such following. It would be impossible to give a true history of modern American embroidery without recog: nizing the influence of the associated artists. It had its beginning in the cohesion of several artists who, in working casually together for the Society of Decorative Art, found their progress

limited by the philanthropic objects of the soci

ety. Feeling the splendid opportunities and encouragements of the time for art, they decided to try the effect of three distinctly decorative branches, carried on together—that of stained glass, under Mr. Tiffany; color decoration and artistic use of textiles, under Mr. Coleman; and the more feminine art of embroidery, the importance of which they fully recognized. Having been the member to whom embroidery and design were committed, I can speak authoritatively as to the effect upon it of the other arts, and I can hardly imagine better conditions for its development. The color influence of glass staining and painting was very great, and the necessity of work worthy to accompany the ef. forts of men so prominent in their professions was a constant incitement. Even after this branch of art developed to a point when it was judged best to place it upon an independent footing the influence remained, and is easily seen in its present work.

Some of the results are before the public in the exhibition of embroideries and tapestriesgiven by the associated artists in November, which shows not only pieces directly from their own rooms, but others from societies and individuals. It is but fair to state that the loaned work very inadequately represents its sources, since the best embroideries of all societies are ordered pieces, which pass at their completion at once into the hands of the buyer.

ADVEERTISEMENTS.

DLEY'S, Grand St., New York.

LOWEST PRICES

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Is the osi-y know N, harmless, pleasant, and absolutely SURE and infallible cure for Pimples. Black Heads, and Flesh Worms. It positively and effectively removes at L, clean, completely, and for good is A Few pays oxily, leaving the skin clear and unblemished always. For those who have so blotches on the face, it beautifies the complexion as nothing else in the world can rendering it CLEAR, FAIR, and TRANSPARENT, and clearing it of all muddiness and coarseness. It is a true remedy to cure, and Not a paint or powder to cover up and hide blemishes. Mailed in plain wrapper for 30 cents, in stamps, or two for 50 cents, by GEORGE N. STODDARD, Druggist, 1226 Niagara Street, Buffalo, N. Y. My FRECKLE-WASH cures Freckles, Tan, and makes the hands white. Sent postpaid for 30 cents. Mention Bazar when you write.

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WEGETABLE GLYCERINE. The ordinary glycerines of commerce are produced from ANIMAL FATS, such as lard, tallow, and often grease, which is even more objectionable. The knowledge of this offensive fact prevents many persons from enjoying the benefits of glycerine. PROCTER & GAMBLE'S VEGETABLE GLYCERINE is produced from SWEET. VEGETABLE OIL, and is of such extreme purity as will satisfy the most fastidious. It is bland to the taste, soothing to the mucous membrane, and healing to irritated sur

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PARKER'S' at

Withit you can stamp more than

1000

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A SET OF DESIGNING PATTERNs.—with a Roses, 12 in., and Daisies, 12 in., for scarf or tidies. 25. this set anyone can design thousands of beautiful pieces cents each; Wide Tinsel Design, 12 in: 25 cents: Strips for Embroidery, Tinsel work, painting, etc. No ex- of Scallops for Flannels; wide and parrow...) *i

erience needed—a child'can do it.” An illustrated Braiding Patterns 10 cents; Splash! Splash! “Goo 3ook shows how to make patterns to fill any space; Night,” and “Good Morning,” for pillow shams, all the flowers used in embrosiery represented. Every two fine outline designs for tidies, 6x3, 50cts;;. Tray one who does stamping wants a set, which can be Cloth Set, 50 cts.; Teapot, Sugar, o and had only with this outfit. This outfit also con- Sauger, etc.; Pond Lilies, 9x12, 25 cts...}, lphabets, tains TWO HUNDRED or more Stamping $1.00; 2 Sets. Numbers, 30 ct; Patterns of Gol o Rod, Patterns ready for use. The following being only Sumac, Daisies, Roses, &c., Tinseland Outline Patterns, a partial list:-Splasher Design, 22 in., 50 cents; Disks, Crescents, &c.

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TION WOWEN WIRE BUSTLE. This Bustle possesses every requisite of a perfect Bustle. It is perfect in shape. It is light in weight, yet so strong it will support the heaviest dress. It is very flexible, yielding to the least pressure, so that the wearer feels no discomfort when sitting against it. It resumes its shape at once when released from pressure. It acts as a perfect cushion, relieving the wearer from the weight of clothing resting upon it. It is the most durable Bustle ever manufactured. It is made of plated steel wire, and will not corrode. Manufactured by the

IRE SPECIALTY CO., 254 S. Second St., Phila, Pa, SOld by áll DBālāIS.

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