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TWIIETHER OIR NO. (Continued from page 835.)

lay there. His hair was close cropped, but a long silky mustache and beard covered half his face with dark luxuriance. His eyes were closed, and the well-cut features looked like marble in that dim light and their own pallor. .

Jim eyed him with an odd expression. This was a new experience to him. He could not quite understand how a strong young fellow could lie in a moment so inert, so passive.

Mother Goose came to his aid. Softly he murmured, to a tune of his own,

“‘Jack fell down
And cracked his crown,
And Jill—"

She didn't, nuther. The' ain't no Jill.”

“You shut up !” said Aunt Polly, in a fierce whisper that startled her comrade into silence.

It was a long night, but the watchers were faithful. When the dawn streamed in at the window the young man did not see it. Aunt Polly had administered another draught of opiate according to orders, and still he slept; so she felt it safe to leave him in Jim's care while she went to get the breakfast. After a while Jim seemed seized with an idea. Stealing to the bedside he bent over the patient and studied every feature. Suddenly, perhaps moved by that odd instinct which tells us even in sleep that some one is gazing at us, the patient opened his eyes– clear, deep gray eyes. Jack uttered a low whistle;

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ran out of his lips involuntarily; but he turned away as the heavy lids dropped again, let down the green paper shade over the window, and fell into deep thought. Pretty soon Aunt Polly sent Ceph Walker to relieve him; and then a hapless widow, recently come to the house, fetched up a cup of coffee and some toast, and fed the young man, who was too stiff and lame to help himself. For Aunt Polly was too busy getting dressed to go to her daughter's, as usual, to come up again; the doctor would come soon; and then Mrs. Pratt, who had already administered his breakfast, would stay by him the rest of the day. Dency and Florinda were in the kitchen at an early hour; Jim had curled up on the hay-mow to think out a certain matter, and gone to sleep there in spite of himself; but the loud peals of the dinner horn roused him, and hastily brushing off the hay, he entered on the scene he had so often dreamed of. Yes; there was the long table spread with clean white cloths, two great turkeys stood side by side at the head, and behind them Dr. Allen was brandishing his carver. A boiled ham occupied the next place, beyond it was a vast chickenpie, and at the other end of the table were the roast ducks, set before old Cephas, while all the spaces between were filled in with potatoes, onions, turnips, cranberry sauce, pickles, and plates of bread, both white and brown. “The poor and the maimed and the halt and the blind” for whom this feast was made, the waifs of the hedges and the highways, were ranged along the sides of the table, clean, smiling, and furbished up to a degree of neatness unusual for their careless natures. “Let us be thankful,” said the doctor, uttering a short grace, and then falling upon the turkeys. Florinda and Dency served the tables; they were to have their dinner set aside for them, and take it with Mrs. Pratt, who would be “spelled” by Jim in her care of the sick man. Words would fail to describe the thorough enjoyment with which that Thanksgiving dinner was eaten; epicures who daily pick and choose their viands from the choicest markets know nothing of food's true sweetness and savor; that is a blessing reserved for those who well know hunger and thirst. Here, when the meats were disposed of, there were still keen appetites left for the pies, the cake, the strong tea, and the rich coffee. In an almost gorged condition the sated guests at last left the table, and Dency went to call Mrs. Pratt, for she could not find Jim. He was hiding behind the shed door, and as soon as she disappeared out popped his queer head, and he called in an audible whisper, “Miss Florindy—say, come here!” Florry went, wondering. “You come up the back stairs into the loft 'long o' me. I've got your Thanksgivin' up there.” Florinda laughed and followed him; they came through the dim little loft into the unlatched door of the spare chamber just as Dency and Mrs. Pratt had left the other door to go down the front stair. “There!” said Jim, “there's your Thanksgivin’; there, on Aunt Poll's best bed. Hooray! ‘Jack fell down And cracked his crown, An' Jill come tumblin' after l'” The figure on the bed raised its head, Florry made one step forward, then a rush, and she was in Harry Dennis's arms: neither beard nor pallor disguised him from her faithful vision, her longing heart. Yes, it was just like a story; but where do people get all their stories? Are they not incidents of life? And do they ever dare to write out the most startling and sensational they know? I do not! After all, was it very odd that Harry,

hastening home to Thanksgiving after one of

those harrowing experiences of shipwreck, rescue on an outward-bound ship, fever from exposure and starvation; experiences which slaughter so many, but do spare a few, should be agon wrecked—only from a horse this time? No more voyages, though, for Harry, just yet, and by the time he was a sound man again the doetor had taken him into his good graces, and persuaded him to become his pupil and succeed him in the care of Dalton people's bodies, if not their

souls, .

- ----- - - --~~~~ because she was now going to demonst

Who shall paint Florinda's joy 2 There are words for it, but they are faint; there are no words to image, even, the deeper, purer, holier rapture of the mother's heart, to whom, widowed, lonely, and so long hopeless, her only son had returned. For what love dares compare itself with a mother's 2 What other does the Creator compare with His own 2 Only less faithful, tender, and exhaustless is it than the infinite heart of God. And other people were thankful too, for never again was the poor farm at Dalton suffered to pass by Thanksgiving Day without celebrating it. Harry and Florinda took care of that. And the day after this Thanksgiving Jim stalked up to old Cephas, with an inexpressible air of exultation and capacity. “There ! now didn't I tell ye we'd hev Thanksgivin' dinner, whether or no?” “How was I to know thet “whether or no’ meant Florindy Allen?” growled Cephas.

“THEM CITYFIED AIRS.”. See illustration on double page.

THE old couple do not like the young man

from the city, judging from their faces. They are plain, matter-of-fact people, and “them cityfied airs,” as the old man calls them, are not what they are used to. The girl, however, regards the stranger with more interest, as she has stopped in her work to listen to the marvellous tales that he is telling of the railroads and other great inventions that he has seen. The boys are amused and fascinated, but the stout countryman who stands behind the chair of the elegant visitor sees in him a formidable rival. The young man is the most self-satisfied of the lot, and affects an easy manner that is out of place with the surroundings. If the honest suitor, who regards the new-comer with suspicion, has read the poem of Burns, perhaps he is saying to himself,

“The rank is but the guinea's stamp; The man's the gowd for a’ that.”

KATHARINE REGINA’

By WALTER BESANT,

Autiloit or “ALI. Sotts AND Coniditions of MEN,” “Tiio WoRLD WENT Writy WELL THEN,” “Thk Chaplain of Till FLEET,” ETO.

CHAPTER XI. A NIGHT OUT.

THE breakfast at Harley House was served, to suit the convenience of those whose work begins early, at half past seven. This was the last breakfast for which the girls had paid. They were the first to sit down, because they wished to avoid questions. “This is the last breakfast paid for, Katharine,” said Lily. “Let us eat as much as we possibly can. When shall we get another breakfast, and where?” Katharine drank the tea, but unfortunately could eat nothing. “You are taking a mean advantage, Katharine,” said her friend. “You know you are not half so strong as I am, and yet you are taking three hours' start in the starving race. Put something in your pocket. Never mind the rules. You must and shall.” She cut off half a dozen great crusts and slices of bread and crammed them into her bag, the little hand-bag that carried absolutely all the possessions of the two girls. Their watches, their wardrobes, even Katharine's engagement ring, everything was gone except the clothes they stood in. Never was wreck more complete. Never had Misfortune made a cleaner sweep of everything. Friends, work, wardrobe, money—what more could she take 2 In a warmer climate she would have torn the clothes off their backs, but in Great Britain this is not allowed to Misfortune, who leaves grudgingly their clothes upon the backs even of the shirt and match makers. One thing more was left to Misfortune. She could separate the two girls. You shall see presently that she even accomplished that. “Now,” said Lily, “we have eaten our breakfast—at least I have. Let us go at once, before the Matron comes down, and while there is nobody to ask questions. Come, Katharine, we have left nothing upstairs. Come.” Now that the supreme moment had arrived, when there was no longer any room for hope, Lily assumed a defiant air, much as one who is led forth to the stake and blasphemes the Holy Inquisition to the last. “Come, Katharine,” for she lingered and trembled. “Come, I say. It will not help us to wait—and cry. We have done our best; we have prayed and there has been no answer. Let us go out now and starve. Come, dear Katharine—oh ! my dear—. it will not help to cry. Let us go out and find a place where we can sit down and wait.” . . . It was eight o'clock. When the door closed

behind them, Katharine sank upon the doorstep;|.

and broke into sobs and moaning.

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be happy in heaven while I am so miserable.|

here? If I am to join you, ask them to kill me quickly.” - - “They'll do that,” said Lily, grimly. “Come.” She put her hand in Katharine's arms and dragged her away. ‘. . Five minutes later Miss Beatrice, came downstairs, her face full of sweetness and satisfaction, these two girls, by means of her collection offif.” teen shillings and tenpence, how faith and patience and resignation are always rewarded.

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seen them leave the house. left nothing. Perhaps they would return in the evening. But they did not. The evenings came and went at Harley House. The girls came home at night heavy of eye and head, tired with their day's work; Miss Augusta played to them; Miss Beatrice talked to them. For a week or so they remembered the two who had sunk under the waters; then they forgot them. As for the collection, it was all returned to the donors, and only Miss Beatrice remembered the girls, and prayed for them that they might yet be saved. At nine o'clock Katharine began to be tired. “Are we to walk about all day long, Lily?” she asked. “Can we not find some place to sit down and rest ?” “We will go to the British Museum. quiet there at least.” They did. They went to the room where are the great pictures of Assyrian battles. Here they sat down. The place was very silent and peaceful. There were very few visitors so early; the attendants with their wands sat about already disposed for the gentle doze which helps them through the day. Presently Katharine leaned her head upon Lily's shoulder and fell fast asleep. But Lily slept not. She had been awake nearly all night, but she was not disposed for slumber. She sat looking at fate with wrathful eyes, and continually putting the same question—it has been asked by every unhappy person since the world began—“What have we done—what have we done—that we should suffer so while the rest of mankind escape?” The morning passed—noon came—the attendant woke up and began to saunter about the rooms with the intention of getting an appetite for dinner. One o'clock struck—Lily sat motionless, unconscious of the time—Katharine still slept beside her. The attendant went away to his dinner, and returned refreshed but languid, and disposed for another doze. When he awoke at three the two girls still sat there, one asleep, and the other bolt-upright, her dark brow contracted, her black eyes full of rage. It is not an unusual thing at museums of the scientific kind for tired visitors to sit down and go to sleep in them, nor is it quite unknown, in collections which are free, for people to drop in for the sake of rest. Bethnal Green Museum is naturally considered in the neighborhood as erected mainly for the convenience of children and a place of safety for them in bad weather. The custodian therefore regarded the sleeping damsel without surprise. - It was about half past three that Katharine awoke. “Well, dear,” said Lily, “you have had a long sleep. Do you feel better ?” “Yes; I am quite well now. But oh! Lily, I am so hungry!” -- “It was a good thing that I remembered to put some bread in my pocket. Let us eat our dinner.” - They did so, and were strengthened by the bread. “And now, Katharine, we may move on. I don't quite know where we are going. But we had better go, I think.” They went outside and turned westward. Fortunately it was a fine afternoon and warm. Af. ter, the bread they felt strong again and able to walk. - They found themselves, after wandering for half an hour, in St. James's Park. It was then five o'clock. - “Katharine,” said Lily, “do you see those seats? There is a whole row of them outside the railings. They are to be our bed to-night." To-morrow—no, we must not think of to-morrow —do you think we might break in upon our shilling? Qh, how tedious it is Look at the heaps of people who are doing nothing; I wonder if they are as poor and as miserable as ourselves?” * St. James's Park this afternoon was thronged with people. They lay about the grass; they sat upon the free benches; they leaned over the railings; they stood upon the bridge; they threw crumbs to the ducks; they looked as if they never did any work, and did not want to do any work, and never had any work offered them. They might have been as poor as the two girls, but they were certainly not miserable at all. It may be laid down as a broad principle that nobody is ever miserable who has solved the problem of living without doing any work. . At six o'clock the evening was beginning to fall. Tsen Lily drew Katharine, who was now simply acquiescent, out of the Park. - " . “We will spend threepence,” she said. “We will buy more bread, because that goes furthest. With threepennyworth of bread we shall have a Supper that will carry us on until the morning. Why, Katharine, we shall actually, with care, make our shilling last till Monday morning. That is splendid. After that I suppose we shall fulfil the purpose for which we were born, and be starved to death. Come, dear, don't give in ; hold up your face; try to look as if you liked it.” When the lights were lit in the street and the shops, there began for a few minutes a new insterest, but it lasted a very little while. . . . . . . “Lily," said Katharine, “I cannot walk any more... Take me to some place where I can sit

It is

--

o “Well, then, we must go back to St. James's

Park. It is the ouly place that I know of where

we can sit down.” * . . . . -At this moment-a great piece of luck befell

*them. They met, walking up Waterloo Place, no;

her than Dittner Bock. That young gentle:

man had been turning his Saturday afternoonio

useful account by observing how trade was con

ducted in the West End. “Oh!” cried Katharine. “We are saved, Lily!

Dittmer, you will help us !”

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I go home and leave you here—by yourselves?” He turned and walked with them toward St. James's Park. - --- “Oh, Katharine !” said Lily, “what a difference —what a difference it makes to have a Man with us! I feel somehow as if we should pull through our troubles. I don't know how it is to be done, or why we should think so. But he inspires confidence. Courage, dear, we have a Man with us. Oh! why don’t they keep a Man at Harley House, only in order to inspire confidence?” They began their night at about half past seven, when the place was full of people walking through, but the girls were tired. They tied their handkerchiefs round their necks and sat close together, Lily on the outside and Katharine between her and Dittmer, by which means she was a little protected from the cold. - A night in the open air in the month of October may be enjoyable under certain conditions, which must take the form of thick blankets to begin with. But it cannot by any stretch of imagination be considered warm. The revulsion of feeling, however, with the two girls at meeting with a protector, the change from despair to confidence which Dittmer inspired, made them suddenly gay. They laughed and prattled; they made little silly jokes which pleased them all three; they seemed to passers-by like a party of young people perfectly happy and without a care; just as if their limbs were not aching all over, and their feet were not getting as cold as a stone, and as if they were not desperately hungry. “It is nine o'clock,” said Lily. supper. Herr Dittmer, will you join us? We have a beautiful supper, made altogether of the finest wheaten meal, exquisitely prepared and most delicately baked till it is a beautiful rich brown. It consists partly of crust and partly of crumb. Pray which portion do you prefer, or shall I assist you to a little of both—without the stuffing?” and then these foolish girls laughed. They were safe. Dittmer had them in his charge. They were quite safe now. Dittmer refused to share in their supper, because, he said, mendaciously, he had already made a copious meal of bread and sausage, which would serve him till the morning. Then the girls ate half the bread between them, and wrapped up the rest for their breakfast. . . At about ten the number of passengers greatly diminished. About the same time it grew much colder; a little wind sprang-up, rattling among the sparse leaves of the trees. Katharine kept dropping off to sleep and waking again with a start. Lily seemed sleeping soundly, and Dittmer was smoking a cigar stolidly. At last Katharine dropped her head and fell into a sleep from which she did not awake till midnight, when she started

cigar between his lips, patiently, as if nothing was the matter, * .

* “You are cold,” he said. “Take my hand

and run a little, or jomp, joost jomp.” Katha

rine tried just to jump, but she was too tired eio ther to run or to jump. She was desperately

cold. Lily, for her part, seemed to mind nothing. Also, Katharine longed with an intense yearning

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5-he wore twelves, I think—and put them on

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“Time for

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Katharine's hands, overherown, so that she had a double pair. And then he produced his own

-

Dittmer Bock still sat with a

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Marvellors EFridacy. —Sunburn, Redness, and light cutaneous affections are cured by Crème Simon. 18écommended by all doctors of Paris, and adopted by every lady of fashion. It whitens, fortifies, and perfumes the skin, and gives a velvety appearance. J. Sixton, 36 Rue de Provence, Paris. Depot, at Park & Tilford's, New York.-[Adv.]

-
CATARRH CURED.

A clergyman, after years of suffering from that loathsome disease, Catarrh, and vainly trying every known remedy, at last found a prescription which completely cured and saved him from death. Any sufferer from this dreadful disease sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to Prof. J. A. Lawrence, 212 East 9th St., New York, will receive the receipt free of charge.-L.Adv.]

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Drawers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --------------- 50c. Ladies' and Men's Heavy All-wool Vests and Drawers, scarlet and white. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Ladies' and Men's Undyed Natural Lamb'sWool Wests and Drawers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E. 50 Men's Genuine Scotch Wool Underwear, reduced to. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . each 1.25

IDRESS GOODS.

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shades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44c. 40-inch Genuine French Camel's - Hair, all colors, worth $1.00. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 c. 40-inch French Sebastopol, all colors, worth $1.00. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79c. 52-inch Imported Ladies' Broadcloth, worth 1.75... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . $1.25

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FACTS ABOUT SEAL-SR INS.

In presenting our new fashions for the coming season, we assure our customers that all Seal garments offered for sale by us are made from genuine Alaska Seal-skins, London dressed and dyed, and manufactured in our own workshop on the premises, so that every garment can be relied upon. Our Seal-skins are purchased in large quantities in London, and although we pay for the very best, we find in assorting them that all do not run alike. We therefore grade them strictly according to quality, X, XX, XXX. The X grade we do not use for garments, but for the cheaper grades of caps, gloves, and lap robes. Our XXX grade of Seal-skin garments is the very best that can possibly be produced. Our XX

grade will wear equally as well but is a little

coarser. We quote the prices for XXX and XX only. We do not manufacture or sell any garments made of Victoria, Lobus Island, Copper Island, China, or Japan Seal-skins, for the reason that they do not wear well or give satisfaction. Garments made of Victoria or Lobus Island or Copper Island Seal-skin can be sold 30% less than Alaska Seal, and garments made from China or Japan Seal-skins can be sold for 50% less. A genuine Alaska Seal-skin Sacque, 40 inches long, XXX grade, is worth $200.00. The same length made of Copper Island or Victoria Sealskin can be sold for $140.00, and the same length made of China or Japan Seal-skin can be sold for $100.00. Sacques made from Chinese Seal-skin

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will not wear longer than two years, and seldom more than one. Copper Island and Victoria Sealskin Sacques will wear from two to three seasons, but they do not hold their color, they turn red and look very shabby, and there is no article of dress which looks worse than a shabby Seal garment, whereas, a garment made from genuine Alaska Seal will hold its color from 7 to 10 years and look handsome and dressy. We are receiving Sacques for alteration and repairs this season, which we sold when on Broadway cor. 10th St. 10 years ago, made of genuine Alaska Seal-skin. All Seal-skin will grow light in time, and the Alaska Seal-skin is the only kind which can be re-dyed successfully, the leather is stronger and the fur denser. The Copper Island, Victoria, Japan, and China Seal-skins will not re-dye and hold together, they tear and rip after being worn a few times. Ladies frequently come to our store and complain that they purchased Seal-skin Sacques two years ago from stores that deal in everything (who know no more about furs than the unfortunate customers who buy), and now complain that they are red and wish we would re-dye them. We always refuse to re-dye or alter any garments except Alaska Seal, for the reasons already stated. A good honest London dressed Alaska Seal-skin garment will wear from 7 to 10 years, and after being worn that length of time can be re-dyed and altered over to a new shape, and then will wear longer than garments made from Copper, Victoria,or China skins. These skins are dressed and dyed in London as well as

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Style F. Style E. SEAL-SIKIN PALETOT. Fashionable French Paletot, a style greatly admired. Specially adapted for stout ladies, giving them a graceful appearance, 52, 54, 56, 5S inches long. - Prices same as Style D. Style F. MINK AND SABLE TAIL TRIMMED PALETOT. Same styles as Fig. E. The most elegant Seal-skin garment worn. Made only of the best quality Alaska Seal-skin, 54, 56, 58, 60 inches long, $425, $450, $475, $500. Same in Sea Otter trimmed, $500, $700, $900.

Alaska Seal-skins, and are advertised and sold for Alaska Seal-skins by hundreds of merchants all over this country who do not know what they are offering for sale. They are often advertised like this, viz. – 100 Alaska Seal-skin Sacques, London dye, $140.00; worth $200,00–125 Seal

skin Sacques, $100.00; reduced from $150.00.

How absurd this is, and yet we are sorry to say that many of our American ladies expect to get $200.00 for $140.00 and $150.00 for $100.00. The fact is that this class of Seal garments are manufactured from Copper, Victoria, Chinese, and Japan Seal-skins. All kinds of written guarantees are offered. Now what good is a guarantee after a Sacque has been worn two seasons? The unfortunate purchaser who supposed she had such a tremendous bargain finds when it is too late that she had the dearest kind of a bargain. You cannot buy a gold dollar for less than one hundred cents, and you cannot buy genuine Sealskins for less than their value. We buy Sealskins and all kinds of furs and materials for cash, manufacture our own goods, do business on Prince Street, one block west of Broadway, where rent is less than one third of the price charged on

A CARD FROM C. C. S

HAYNE.

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Broadway, 14th St., 23d St., or 6th Ave., the retail shopping districts, and yet, with all our advantages of small expenses, with large capital invested and twenty-five years' experience in manufacturing and dealing in furs, we cannot sell reliable furs and Seal-skins for less than the prices quoted in this advertisement, and we do business on small profits. We believe that parties who deal with us will find that our prices for strictly reliable furs are much less than those dealers who do not manufacture, thereby saving middlemen profits, and less than manufacturers who make all grades of fur goods, as we make a specialty of fine furs only. Merchants who sell our productions throughout the country are securing the best trade. Reliable furs, well made, that wear well and give entire satisfaction, will always secure confidence and custom. Ladies unable to purchase our Furs in the place where they reside can order direct from us. Goods will be sent C. O. D. with privilege of examination, or, if purchase money is sent, three days' time will be allowed to examine the goods, and if not found entirely satisfactory, the goods may be returned and the money will be refunded, less express charges. All orders intrusted to us will be filled promptly and to the best of our ability and your entire satisfaction. Especial attention paid to Mail orders. Send for any New Illust, ated Fashion Dook, mailed free. C. C. SHHA YNE,

Manufacturing Furrier, 103 Prince St., N.Y. Chicago Agency, 193 State St.

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Four Manufacturer, 103 Prince Street.

A SPIENDI) (HRISTMAS PRESENT

Especially appreciated by Society Ladies who do not care to leave the draping of reception dresses to other hands. Our form fits every member of the family, and is a household necessity well attested by the thousands now in use. Recommended by all Publishers of Fashions. Sent to any address on receipt of price. Bazar Skirt-Form, in * case, $3.00. Complete Form, $6.50. Bazar Skirt-Forn Iron Post, to which bust can be added, $3.50.

HALL’S BAZAR FORM C0, 46 East 14th St.. New York. Send for Illustrated Circular giving full description. Mention Harper's Bazar. These are the only perfect Portable Forms ever introduced.—The Butterick Publishing Co.

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You can, by ten weeks' study, master either of these languages sufficiently for every-day and business conversation, by Dr. Rich. S. RosenTHAL’s celebrated MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM. Terms, $5.00 for books of each language, with privilege of answers to all questions, and correction of exercises. Sample copy, Part I., 25 cents. Liberal terms to Teachers.

MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO.

Herald Building, ston, Mass.

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