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VoI. XX. —No. 50. Copyright, 1887, by HARPER & Brothers.

OUR THANKSGIVING DECORATIONS.

T was Nellie who asked it of dear old Dr. Burgoyne—Nellie, who is always brave in such matters—that our thanksgiving for sparing to us yet longer the dear little mother might find speech in the church decorations; so the very best of all the bountiful year had given us was brought together. The late-blooming chrysanthemums that so defiantly flaunt their rich coloring of yellow and deep gold in the very face of the early frosts and rude boisterous winds, as well as those of more dainty delicate coloring which almost seem to be apologizing for making their appearance so far behind; all these were gathered before they lost their freshness, and, with stems well set into buckets of water, placed in the cool

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10,

firmly, and making a perfect net-work across the top to keep the heavy fruit from slipping. When some of the larger leaves had lost their stems we used small hair-pins to put them in, and found the substitute better than the reality. Next came the windows nearest the chancel—deep high Gothic ones, with sloping window-shelves that only admitted a certain style of decoration. We had long plumes of pampas grass for these, some of them with stalks that would admit of extending up the window four or five feet; light wires were passed across to serve as support, and we arranged the feathery masses to conceal the stems and yet admit the play of light and shade upon their creamy surfaces. At the base were great heads of scarlet geranium of the same variety, to avoid confusion of color. How lovely

TEN CENT'S A COPY. WITH A SUPPLEMENT.

dows, using for a bordering the foliage and berries of the asparagus. Dahlias of the dwarf variety are always a success, either as a border, or for lettering when texts are desired; the rich maroons are most effective on a background of golden coleus, while the white are still more snowy against the red variety of these foliage plants. Groups of palms, that do not wilt with furnace heat nor rebel if placed in dark corners, should be massed around the readingdesk in corners where a mass of green, light and feathery, is needed. Here comes too the green of the Spanish-chestnut, with its rough-looking fruit that will serve to festoon the sprays of the many-hued Virginia creeper, just in its glory of foliage and dark purple berries. Those of the mountain-ash, if gathered long before they are needed, should be hung

airy cellar where furnace heat could not affect them.

Once a week they were carefully lifted into

pails of fresh water, which was all the care needed to keep them just as fresh as when first taken in. Great heavy masses of them bordered the lower edges of the hangings on both pul. pit and readingdesk; black pins, both large and small, kept them in place, working in more and more of the flowers where they seemed to be needed after the first had been pinned down. We first attempted needle and thread, but the latter tangled, and besides it was not always easy to

give them the proper twist and turn. Here and there we pinned

them as if a shower of the blossoms had been wafted over the rest of the hanging, massing more toward the left-hand side, with lighter effect on the right. Row after row of stout wire passed around the broad heavy moulding of the pulpit; a few tacks at either end gave purchase and kept each succeeding row taut and the right distance apart; and when this was accomplished we looked over our flowers, for it was to be a perfect harmony of color, this deep pulpit border. There were the dark shades of old-gold almost passing into the browns, with the tawny yellows and warm glowing ones that really gave out a light of their own; the different tones of lemon, even down to white, for it was by subtle gradations of color we intended to work from base to top, just as the clouds at sunset seem to melt and blend into each other. The high gray-stone font, standing as it did well out from one of the front corners, made a most delightful bit of coloring against the neutral tint of the side walls. Do you know the exquisite tints the leaves of the Ampelopsis veitchii take on with the early autumn 2 If for nothing else than its lovely coloring, one could afford to give it a place; they range in size from those of the smallest sort of ivy to the large maples, each one bright and glossy as if a light coat of wax had been given it. Imagine a broad border of this wealth of color against the cool gray of the stone, with great bunches of purple and white grapes surmounting all! For the support we twined the heavy wire round and round, securing it

Fig. 1–FUR-LINED CLoAK witH
SEAL TRIMMING.
For description see Supplement.

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it was when the sunlight streaming through the one cast a faint glow over to the other There could be no prettier contrast than the clear wood brown of some of the autumn foliage with the late-blooming pink gladiolus. Try it if there are any left, and another season plant the bulbs so the flowers will come when wanted: not all the pinks are available, only those with a suspicion of salmon, or the rose pinks that are free from any purple tinge. The hop-vine with its clearcut foliage, bold and decided, is fine for bordering, while the blackberry, rich in red-brown coloring, is most exquisite. The mountain-ash and thorn, if too sharp a frost has not tendered the stems, give brilliant colors. The delicate fern-mosses, with fanciful red and gray lichens, blend admirably in the broad bases of the win

Fig. 3.-FUR-LINEd Russian Cloak-FRONT.—[For

For pattern and description see Suppl., No. I., Figs. 1-7.

with the berry down, so all thesap may run into them, not out, and if soaked in water a day will plump very much. The barberry keeps nicely in very strong salt and water. In the centre of the chancel we massed the wheat, the rye, and the oats tied loosely together, with base broad enough to keep it firm. Do not have it fastened too tightly, with the straws straight and stiff, but carelessly twisted, with the ears of corn, large and golden, some

| | | husked entirely, ||| others partially, | put here and there around. Apples,

both yellow and brilliant red, here find their proper place, while the deep-toned pumpkins may be made effective if used in moderation. All along the choir stalls we put a deep fringe of the grains, using a broad piece of Canton flannel or heavy canvas for the base, securing on the oats, wheat, rye, and barley to form deep sharp points. The top was edged with bulrush, its superb brown standing out well against the color below, as well as the feathery grasses that surmounted it, while the capsicum hung as tassels here and there among it.

THE UGLY GIRL.

T is a strange fact that the ugly girl is rather a favorite than otherwise, although a thing of beauty is a joy forever. When we look at her we lament the shape of her nose, we sigh over the cast in her eye, we deplore the dulness of her complexion, we can find nothing to praise: but perhaps she smiles, or she has a witching manner. She knows the spell which puts every one at his ease; she owns the charm which makes others pleased with themselves; and then we are wont to say that there is no such person as the ugly girl. But to those who do not know her, who do not come under the magnetism of her presence, she remains the ugly girl to the end of the chapter; and when she marries carries off the best match of the season, perhaps—prettier women are at their wits' end to know what attractions she possesses superior to their own. What is it that redeems the ugly face and makes it shine with comeliness, so that we sometimes would not exchange it, with all its misshapen features, for the beauty of Aphrodite? The plain face which is alive with intelligence, which beams with an expression of refine

Back, see Page 852.]

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| | No. | | o // o | |Iso so | o | | o, o | o o H. | || *Ayo off £o FUR-LINED RUSSIAN Cloak.-BAck. PEAU DE Soie AND MoIR£ RECEPTION Toi- PLAIN AND STRIPED Wool, CoS- BENGALINE SILK AND PLUSH RECEPTION Toi[For Front, see Front Page.] LETTE.-BACK.—[For Front, see Page 861.] TUME. LETTE–Back–IFor Front, see Page 861.] For pattern and description see Supplement, For description * Supple- For description see Supplement. - Inell

For pattern and description see Supplement, No. I., Figs, 1–7.

Fig. 1–MoRNING CAP MADE of A SILK HANDRERCHIEF.

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PLUSH MUFF.
For description see Suppl.

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Fig. 1.-CoAT For GIRL FROM 7 to 9 YEARs
CRoCHET LEGGING For CHILD FROM

CHILD’s LEGGING. old.—FRONT—[For Back, see Page 853.] DREss. u or pattern and description see Sup- For pattern and description see Supplement, For description see Sup- For pattern and description see Supplement, No. VI., Figs, 38–47. plement. No. VIII., Figs, 50–57. 2 To 3 YEARs old.

plement, No. X., Figs, 65-67.

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Embroidered FootMuff.

See illustration on page S52.

The outside of this foot-muff is of black mohairplush. The front is decorated with a design in embroidery, for which the solid work is executed in tapestry wool, and the outlines are defined with laid gold cord. The inside is lined with fur, and a band of fur edges the opening. The bottom of the muff is made of leather, and the edges are bound with leather.

Embroidered Hassock. See illustration on page 852.

The embroidered decoration for the top of this low hassock is worked on a ground of light olive cloth. The fullsized design is given in outline in Fig. 37 on the pattern-sheet Supplement. The leaves and stems are executed in olive green tapestry wool, the leaves partly in solid satin stitch and

BEADEd YokE JERSEY. For description see Supplement.

Coat For GIRL FROM 7 to 9 YEARs old.—Back. [For Front, see Page 852.]

For pattern and description see Supplement, No. VI., Figs. 38–47.

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Corsage for House DREss.
For description see Supplement.

partly in open fea-
ther stitching, and
the stems outlined
in feather stitch and
studded with French
knots. The flowers
are worked with ter-
ra-cotta wool in Ja-
nina stitch, which is
a long close herring-
bone taken from side
to side of the petals,
and are veined with

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Young Lady’s Tailor JackET. For pattern and description see Supplement, No. IX., Figs. 58-64

BRaided Yoko Jersey.

long stitches of dark terra-cotta chenille. They are outlined with couched gold cord, while the leaves are surrounded with dark olive chemille. The scroll ornaments in the top of the design are outlined in laid gold cord, and surrounded outside the cord with a thick couching of double threads of terra-cotta wool, sewed down with silk stitches at even intervals. The cloth ground is cut away along the outer edge of the scrolls, and this space is underlaid with dark olive plush. Two scarfs of terra-cotta plush are draped on the upper two sides of the cushion above the

embroidery. The sides are faced with olive plush, and trimmed

with a furniture fringe, which hangs from the upper edge. The gathered ends of the plush draperies are finished with tassels of fringe at the corners.

For pattern and description see Supplement, No.
III., Figs. 13–22.

Coat For GIRL from 13 to 15 YEARs old.—BAck. [For Front, see Page 852.]

For pattern and description see Supplement, No. VIII.,
Figs. 50–57.

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