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Physical Culture Exercises

PREPARED BY HENRY SUDER

I. WAND EXERCISES FOR BOYS Formation of Class.-The class is arranged into ranks of three, the two outer members are supplied with wands, the center member exercises without wand. The outer members are called first division (1. Div.), the center member, who stands one step in rear of the outer, is called second division (II. Div.).

D. All return to standing position, and re

main 1-8 counts. 3. Exercise: Like exercise one, but at B bend

trunk forward and at C raise trunk. 4. Exercise: Like exercise three, but take one

count for each movement.

II. Div. I. Div.

Group II.
A. Boys of I. Div. execute one-fourth turn

inward and raise wand, arms bent
(hands reverse hold), and lunge for-

ward right. Boys of II. Div. execute one step for

ward, arms raised forward in position.

All remain 1-8 counts.
B. Boys of II. Div, grasp wands from below

and move feet backward to rear-hang

stand and remain 1-8 counts. C. Boys of II. Div. move feet forward to

front-hang stand and remain 1-8

counts. D. All return to starting position and remain

1-8 counts. 5. Exercise: Like exercise one, but straighten

arms upward. 6. Exercise: Like exercise five, but take one

count for each movement.

II. Div.

I. Div. PART I. 1. Exercise: I. Div., raise wand forward, arms

bent and lunge forward left.
B. Straighten arms forward and change po-

sition of knees.
C. Return to position A.

D. Return to starting position.
II. Div. A. Raise arms to thrust and lunge

forward left.
B. Thrust arms fo ard and change posi-

tion of knees.
C. Return to position A.

D. Return to starting position.
Note to exercises: Take two counts for each

movement, practice lunging, exercises alter

nately 1-16 counts. 2. Exercise: Like exercise one, but take one count for each movement.

Group I.
A. Boys of I. Div. execute one-fourth turn

inward and lunge forward, left arms

extended downward. Boys of II. Div. execute one step for

ward, arms raised forward in position.

All remain 1-8 count.
B. Boys of II. Div. grasp wands and move

feet backward to front leaning sup-
port, arms extended and remain 1-8

counts. C. Boys of II. Div. move feet forward to

rear leaning support and remain 1-8 counts.

Group III. A. Boys of I. Div. execute one-fourth turn

inward and lunge forward left, arms

extended downward. Boys of II. Div. execute one step for

ward and one-fourth turn left, at the same time placing hands

on front members' shoulders, standing between

both and remain 1-8 counts. B. Boys of II. Div. step on wands carried

by boys of I. Div. and remain 1-8

counts. C. Boys of II. Div. raise arms forward

obliquely upward and remain 1-8

counts. D. Boys of II. Div. place hands on front

members' shoulders at one and jump down at two and all return to starting position 1-8 counts.

7. Exercise: Like exercise five, but at B bend

trunk backward, at C raise trunk. 8. Exercise: Like exercise seven, but take one

count for each movement.

on

Group IV. A. Boys of I. Div. execute one-fourth turn

inward and lunge forward right, arms

extended downward. Boys of II. Div. one step forward and

place hands I. Div. shoulders, standing between, facing frontward

and remain 1-8 counts. B. Boys of II. Div. step on wands (facing

frontward) and remain 1-8 counts. C. Boys of II. Div. raise arms sideways and

remain 1-8 counts. D. All return to starting position (see Group III) and remain 1-8 counts.

Pose.

Boys of II. Div. step between boys of I.

Div. who then lower arms and remain

1-8 counts. B. Boys of I. Div. lunge sideways left and

kneel on right knee, place left wand on

shoulders and right wand on hips. Boys of II. Div. execute one-fourth turn

left, place both hands on left wand and step on right wand,' remain 1-8

counts. C. Boys of I. Div. rise to lunging position.

Boys of II. Div. raise right arm forward obliquely upward, remain 1-8

counts. D. All return to starting position. 3. Exercise: I. Div. like exercise one, but at B

bend trunk sideways right (left) at C

raise trunk. II. Div. like exercise one, but extend both legs

backward. 4. Exercise: Like exercise three, but take one

count for each movement.

PART II.

1. Exercise: I. Div. A. Raise wand arms bent

and lunge sideways left. B. Wind left, move wand sideways left and

change position of knees. C. Rewind left, wind sideways right and

change position of knees. D. Return to starting position. II. Div. A. Bend knees to squatting position,

hands between knees on floor.
B. Extend left leg backward.
C. Return to position A.

D. Return to starting position.
Note to exercise I: Take two counts to each

movement, practice lunging exercises al

ternately 1-16 counts. 2. Exercise: Like exercise one, but take one

count for each movement.

Group II. . Like Group I. but lunge to opposite direction at

C. Boys of II. Div. raise right arm forward obliquely upward and left leg back

ward. 5. Exercise: I. Div. like exercise one, but at B

move wand forward, right hand at left

shoulder. II. Div. like exercise one, but at B extend

left leg and raise right (left) arm. 6. Exercise five, but take one count for each movement.

Group III.
Like Group I., A, at B Boys of I. Div. jump

to side straddle position, arms extended
downward. Boys of II. Div. step on wand.
At C boys of I. Div. raise wand on hips.

Boys of II. Div. raise arms sideways. 7. Exercise: I. Div. like exercise five, but at B

turn trunk left (right). II. Div. like exercise three, but extend both

legs backward straddling. 8. Exercise: Like exercise seven, but take one

count for each movement.

Group 1.
Boys of I. Div. carry wand horizontally

at sides of body, arms extended down-
ward. Moving to the above position
is done in the following manner: Boys
standing in first ranks move their
wands backward to the right, keeping
one end in right hand, while the other
end is taken by boy in rear, who at
the same time moves his wand for-
ward to the left, one end of which is
taken by the boy in front with left
hand. Changing of wands to be done

by two counts. A. Boys of I. Div. jump to side straddle

position, arms raised upward.

Group IV. Like Group III., but at C boys of II. Div.

kneel with both knees on shoulders of rear member, hands placed on shoulders

of front member. Boys of I. Div. raise arms sideways.

Pose.

II.

5. Like exercise one, but practice hand circle

behind body. 6. Like exercise five, but to the right. 7. Like exercise three, but turn and bend trunk

backward. 8. Like exercise four, but kneel right.

Pose.

III.

INDIAN CLUB EXERCISES FOR BOYS

AND GIRLS.

Part I. 1. Arm circle to the left with both clubs, left arm

remains in position, sideways obliquely up-
ward, right arm continues circle combined
with three lower hand circles 1-4 count.

Practice 1-16 counts.
Note: At one, execute arm circle to the left

with both clubs, left arm remains in posi-
tion sideways obliquely upward. At two,
the right arm continues the arm circle
combined with one lower hand circle; at
three and four practice two more lower

hand circles. 2. Like exercise one, but to the right. 3. A. Arm circle, inward with both clubs, tip

clubs, arms extended sideways and lunge

sideways left. B. Move forearms toward chest, change posi

tion of knees and bend trunk forward. C. Raise trunk, move arms sideways and

change position of knees. D. Return to starting position, 1-4 counts.

Note: Practice lunging exercises 'alternately. 4. A. Move arms sideways, tip clubs, and kneel

on left knee. B. Move arms sideways right. C. Move arms sideways left. D. Move arms sideways right 1-4 counts. E. Practice four horizontal hand circles and

at the same time move arms sideways

left 1-4 counts. Repeat the above movements 1-16 counts. 5. Like exercise one, but practice hand circle

behind shoulder. 6. Like exercise five, but vice versa. 7. Like exercise three, but bend trunk sideways. 8. Like exercise four, but kneel right.

Pose.

Part II. 1. Like exercise one, part I, but practice upper

hand circle. 2. Like exercise two, part I, but practice upper

hand circle. 3. Like exercise two, part I, but turn and bend

trunk forward. 4. Like exercise, part I, but tip clubs, arms ex

tended sideways, move forearms toward

chest and return 1-4 counts. Practice four horizontal hand circles and at

the same time move arms outward 1-4

counts.
Repeat above 1-4 counts-1-16 counts.

DUMB-BELL EXERCISES FOR GIRLS.

PART I. 1. Exercise: A. Raise bells over shoulders, and

place left foot sideways. B. Swing bells sideways downward (cross arms

in front of chest) and cross left foot

backward with bending of knees. C. Return to position A. D. Return to starting position 1-4 counts. Note: Practice foot exercise alternately 1-16

counts. 2. Exercise: A. Raise left bell over head, arm

bent, right arm sideways obliquely downward and execute four glide loops side

ways left 1-4 counts. B. Change position of arms and execute two

hops in place on right foot, left foot raised forward, change position of arms again and two hops on left foot, right

leg raised forward 1-4 counts. C. Repeat A, but vice versa, 1-4 counts. D. Repeat B, but vice versa, 1-4 counts—1-16

counts. 3. Exercise: Like exercise one, but at B, bend

trunk forward, at C raise trunk. 4. Like exercise two, but begin to the right and

at B raise foot backward. 5. Exercise: Like exercise one, but swing bells

down and in a circle over head. 6. Exercise: A. Raise left bell over shoulder,

right bell on hip and execute four side steps left with crossing of right foot for

ward 1-4 counts. B. Place toes of left foot near toes of right

foot at one, hop on right foot, swing left leg forward at two (knee kept slightly bent), place toes of left foot near toes of right foot at three and hop and swing left foot forward at four, 1-4

counts. C. Repeat A, but vice versa, 1-4 counts. D. Repeat B, but vice versa, 1-4 counts—1-16

counts. 7. Exercise: Like exercise five, but bend trunk

sideways left (right). 8. Exercise: Like exercise six, but begin to the

right. Pose.

Best to be found

LIBRARY books: It is fine to have books Mental fatigue in children.-Bellei has to loan to the children for home reading in studied mental fatigue in children, as the third grade. When the book is re- evidenced by the character of their afterturned, require a small book review from noon lessons. He states most positively the child, as to the contents of the story that the work done by children continuing and how he likes it. This is most whole- their lessons on into the afternoon, is, on some work, instilling in the mind of the

account of the great mental fatigue that child a lasting taste for good literature. it involves, of no advantage to their in

struction but is full of danger to their ANCIENT RIDDLES:- What do liars do health.-J. Bellei, Lancet, Feb. 3, 1906. after death? Lie still.

Jour. review, New York Med. Jour. Why is an egg overdone like an egg underdone? Because it is hardly done. Little Doris is four years old.

She What is that which works when it plays lives in Minneapolis. Her nurse's name is and plays when it works? A fountain. Freda. At the kindergarten, she has

Which is the greatest riddle in the world? learned our national anthem and she sings Life, because we must all give it up. it with gusto to her dolly at home. Here

Why is a street car a safe place in a is her rendition of the first stanza: thunder storm? Because it has a con- Our country is of thee ductor.

Sweet land of levity

Of fleas I sing. "Next to paternity and maternity come

Land is the pilgrim's pride the responsibilities of the school teacher, Land where our fathers die, and Wordsworth wished to be remembered From every mountain sigh as a teacher or nothing.

Let Freda reign. “People of antipathies, prejudices and

-School Education. strong dislikes cannot make successful

LATIN confers on the student a knowlteachers. It is essential that a teacher, to be a success, should love boys and girls and edge of the English by enlarging his vocabalso love his profession. A kind word has ulary, and gives judgment in choosing often decided a boy's fate.Dean Penni- synonyms.

synonyms. It confers a knowledge of man, University of Pennsylvania.

English by study of grammar. English has no inflections; Latin has. It teaches

diagramming. It teaches a mastery of IN

KINDERGARTEN: Ernest had English from the standpoint of rhetoric. been absent for several days. His teacher It gives the effect of emphasis by the asked the “circle" if any one could tell arrangement of words in the sentence. It why Ernest did not come to school. One gives further knowledge of English by little hand went up and its owner said, paraphrasing. In some respects there is "Please, teacher, he's sick-he's got the better drill in Latin than in English-it chicken coops."

teaches precision.Prin. A. H. Speer, A little girl' was absent. Can

any one

Atchison, Kan. tell me why Marie is away?” asked this same teacher. Patsy gave the reason as There is no surer way to win the respect he piped out, "Marie's got an illustrated and confidence of children than by fair and tooth."

impartial dealings under all circumstances

THE

and at all times. The sense of justice is a pessimistic opinion that had been exstrong even in the vicious child. None, pressed. more than a pupil, recognizes the fact that "To be so unreasonably and so resocertain abuses of school regulations deserve lutely hopeless is unwise,” she said. "It punishment, and little resentment will be reminds me of an old woman I used to cherished toward you, provided the punish- know. ment is commensurate with the offense. "This old woman was always ill, always Do not make a personal issue of every in- ailing. Her various diseases were to her fraction of school rules and when it is found the most interesting topic in the world necessary to deal with refractory pupils, do and she must have thought them most so as far as possible in private.-Supt. S. interesting to others also, for she always S. Murphy, Mobile, Ala.

talked of them—she talked of nothing

else. THE ESSENTIAL factor in any school is “One day I found her eating a hearty the teacher, and his personality and char- meal and asked her how she was. acter count for more than mere book

“She sighed and answered: knowledge, more than fine buildings, ex- 'I feel very well, ma'am, but I always pensive apparatus, or great libraries. All

feel bad when I feel well, because I know these things are exceedingly desirable, but

I am going to feel worse afterward.' without the inspiration of the enthusiastic teacher they amount to little. In a teacher It may be that some spiteful person says the wisdom of the heart must ever rank unkind things about your work that you above the wisdom of the head. He must do not deserve, but every sensible person be more inspirational than informational. knows just how much to believe from It was the love and respect that the boys people with reputations for that kind of of Rugby had for the fine character of talking. If Mrs. F-tells everywhere Dr. Arnold, that gave to that school its that her Johnny is not learning a thing in success.-West Virginia School Journal. your room, remember that she has said

that about every other teacher Johnny The very best and most practical and ever had, and don't take it to heart. It definite way to promote the public school is impossible for you to supply Johnny interests in any locality is to elect the right with brains, and if the majority of your kind of men on the board of education. pupils are making progress it is safe to Pay no attention to party or church affilia

suppose their parents will not pay much tion-elect only the wisest and most pro- attention to the mother of one dull boy. gressive men. In many sections the school There are fathers and mothers in every interests are being retarded rather than community who complain about everypromoted by the boards of education. A thing and every body, but the world at somewhat wide acquaintance with the large turns a deaf ear to their endless tales school conditions in the state leads us to of woe.--American Primary Teacher. say that wherever there is a progressive school board there the schools are good, A SUBJECT of keen interest is that of the the teachers are fairly well paid, and the incorrigible child. And here, more than community is proud of its schools.-West anywhere else, the personality of the Virginia School Journal.

teacher is of paramount importance. In

deed, with the right kind of a teacher, it MRS. CLARENCE H. Mackay at a meeting would almost seem as if there were no such of the Roslyn school board disagreed with thing as an incorrigible child. In a school

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