Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book about Everything and Nothing

Copertina anteriore
Open Court, 1 ago 1999 - 224 pagine
Designed for philosophers as well as readers with no particular philosophical background, the essays in this lively book are grouped into four amusing acts. Act One looks at the four Seinfeld characters through a philosophical lens and includes Jerry and Socrates: The Examined Life? Act Two examines historical philosophers from a Seinfeldian standpoint and offers Plato or Nietzsche? Time, Essence, and Eternal Recurrence in Seinfeld. Act Three, Untimely Meditations by the Water Cooler, explores philosophical issues raised by the show, such as, Is it rational for George to do the opposite? And Act Four, Is There Anything Wrong with That?, discusses ethical problems of everyday life using Seinfeld as a basis. Seinfeld and Philosophy also provides a guide to Seinfeld episodes and a chronological list of the philosophers cited in this book.
 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Review: Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book about Everything and Nothing (Popular Culture and Philosophy #1)

Recensione dell'utente  - Carlos Rodarte - Goodreads

This has to be one of my favorite books...probably helps that Seinfeld is one of my favorite shows. While reading light versions of deep philosophical issues, I find myself literally laughing out loud ... Leggi recensione completa

Indice

George A Reisch
Title Page
An Aristotelian Analysis
Feminist Icon or Just One of the Boys?
Stages on Lifes
Seinfeld Sophistry and the
Time Essence and Eternal Recurrence
Seinfeld Subjectivity and Sartre
Paradoxes of Subjectivity
The Significance of
Seinfeld and the Moral Life
Virtue Ethics in TVs Seinfeld
Is Doing Nothing Something?
EPISODE GUIDE
A CHRONOLOGY OF SOME BIGTIME PHILOSOPHERS
NOTES ON THE SCRIPT WRITERS AKA THE CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS

Wittgenstein and Seinfeld on the Commonplace
Is it Rational for George to Do

Altre edizioni - Visualizza tutto

Parole e frasi comuni

Informazioni sull'autore (1999)

William Irwin is an assistant professor of philosophy at King's College in Wilkes-Barre, PA. He is the author of Intentionalist Interpretation: A Philosophical Explanation and Defense.

Informazioni bibliografiche