The Fourth Estate:: Contributions Towards a History of Newspapers, and of the Liberty of the Press, Volume 2

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David Bogue, 1850 - 298 pagine
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Pagina 42 - Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Pagina 260 - Johnson long afterwards owned that, though he had saved appearances, he had taken care that the Whig dogs should not have the best of it...
Pagina 238 - The gallery in which the reporters sit has become a fourth estate of the realm. The publication of the debates, a practice which seemed to the most liberal statesman of the old school full of danger to the great safeguards of public liberty, is now regarded by many persons as a safeguard tantamount, and more than tantamount, to all the rest together.
Pagina 170 - Newspaper, which were taken off last night by a mechanical apparatus. A system of machinery, almost organic, has been devised and arranged, which, while it relieves the human frame of its most laborious efforts in printing, far exceeds all human powers in rapidity and despatch.
Pagina 43 - Here I wrote and read in fine weather, sometimes under an awning. In autumn my trellises were hung with scarlet runners, which added to the flowery investment. I used to shut my eyes in my arm-chair, and affect to think myself hundreds of miles off.
Pagina 37 - ... event of a total change of system. Of all monarchs, indeed, since the revolution, the successor of George the Third will have the finest opportunity of becoming nobly popular.
Pagina 14 - One asylum of free discussion is still inviolate. There is still one spot in Europe where man can freely exercise his reason on the most important concerns of society, where he can boldly publish his judgment on the acts of the proudest and most powerful tyrants. The press of England is still free. It is guarded by the free constitution of our forefathers. It is guarded by the hearts and arms of Englishmen, and I trust I may venture to say, that if it be to fall, it will fall only under the ruins...
Pagina 17 - ... moral sentiments, obliterate the distinctions between right and wrong in their understanding, and teach the multitude to feel no longer any reverence for that justice which they thus see triumphantly dragged at the chariot wheels of a tyrant ; — even then, when this unhappy country, triumphant indeed abroad, but enslaved at home, had no prospect but that of a long succession of tyrants wading through slaughter to a throne...
Pagina 171 - ... fresh coat of ink, which itself again distributes, to meet the ensuing sheet, now advancing for impression ; and the whole of these complicated acts is performed with such a velocity and simultaneousness of movement, that no less than 1,100 sheets are impressed in one hour.
Pagina 18 - Till the destruction of their country, no danger can fall upon them for the performance of their duty ; and I do trust that there is no Englishman so unworthy of life, as to desire to outlive England. But if any of us are condemned to the cruel punishment of surviving our country — if, in the inscrutable counsels of Providence, this favoured seat of justice and liberty, this noblest work of human wisdom and virtue, be destined...

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