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CONTRIBUTIONS TOWARDS

A HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS,

AND OF THE LIBERTY OF THE PRESS.

BY F. KNIGHT HUNT.

IN TWO VOLS.

VOL. II.

“What is it that drops the same thought into ten thousand minds at the same moment ?
--the Newspaper."

DE TOCQUEVILLE.
“There she isthe great engine-she never sleeps. She has her ambassadors in every
quarter of the world-her couriers upon every road. Her officers march along with armies,
and her envoys walk into statesmen's cabinets. They are ubiquitous. Yonder Journal
has an agent at this minute giving bribes at Madrid ; and another inspecting the price of
potatoes at Covent Garden."

PENDENNIS.

LONDON:

DAVID BOGUE, 86, FLEET STREET.

MDCCCL.

LONDON:

HENRY VIZETELLY, PRINTER AND ENGRAVER,

GOUGH SQUARE, FLEET STREET.

CHAPTER VII.

THE PRESS OF THE PRESENT CENTURY.

“Before this century shall have run out, Journalism will be the whole press --the whole human thought. Since that prodigious multiplication art has given to speech-to be multiplied a thousand-fold yet-mankind will write their book day by day, hour by hour, page by page. Thought will spread abroad in the world with the rapidity of light; instantly conceived, instantly written, instantly understood, at the extremities of the earth, it will speed from pole to pole. Sud. den, instant, burning with the fervour of soul which made it burst forth, it will be the reign of the human word in all its plentitude—it will not have time to ripen, to accumulate into the form of a book--the book will arrive too late. The only book possible from today is a Newspaper.”- Lamartine.

Napoleon Bonaparte in Westminster Hall.The Libels of the French

Émigrants. - L'Ambigu.—Macintosh's Speech in defence of M. Peltier.—Leigh Hunt, the Examiner, and the Prince Regent.Cobbett.-Numerous Government Prosecutions." The Battle of the Unstamped.”—Bulwer, and the Taxes on Knowledge. -Reduction of the Stamp.-The Increase of Newspapers.

THE

HE present century found the press surrounded

by difficulties, yet growing in power and usefulness, despite the constant suspicion of the ruling powers, the occasional attacks of the law-officers of the crown, and the weight of still increasing taxation. We have seen how its aid was invoked here by the opponents of the revolutionary party in France; how a Paper was set up in England to abuse the new rulers of the sister country, whilst, in return, a portion of the Parisian press replied to the verbal missiles thus hurled across the Channel, by abuse of England, and all things English. Soon the people of this country were surprised by the curious spectacle of

VOL. II.

B

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