Rome the Cosmopolis

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Catharine Edwards, Greg Woolf
Cambridge University Press, 2 nov 2006 - 268 pagine
Ancient Rome was a vast and multifarious metropolis. By coercion and seduction it drew to itself a population from every province of its empire, as well as foodstuffs, building materials and entertainments from all over the world. What impact did the possession of empire have on the city itself? How did its inhabitants, visitors and subjects make sense of its unique role? How did Rome stay Roman when it contained the world? This collection of essays seeks to explore key aspects of the relationship between Rome and its empire.
 

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Sommario

Cosmopolis Rome as World City
1
The triumph of the absurd Roman street theatre
21
Incorporating the alien the art of conquest
44
Inventing Christian Rome the role of early Christian art
71
Slavery and the growth of Rome The transformation of Italy in the second and first centuries BCE
100
Rivalling Rome Carthage
123
Migration and the Metropolis
147
Germs for Rome
158
Embracing Egypt
177
The City of Letters
203
Bibliography
222
Index
245
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Informazioni sull'autore (2006)

Catharine Edwards is Lecturer in Ancient History at Birkbeck College, University of London. Her previous books include Writing Rome: Textual Approaches to the City (1996; HB 0521 550807; PB 0521 559529).

Greg Woolf is Professor of Ancient History at the University of St Andrews. His previous books include Becoming Roman: The Origins of Provincial Civilization in Gaul (1998 HB 0521 414458; 2000 PB 0521 789826).

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