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GREEK READER,

,

SELECTED CHIEFLY FROM

JACOBS' GREEK READER,

ADAPTED TO

BULLIONS' GREEK GRAMMAR,

WITH

AN INTRODUCTION ON THE IDIOMS OF THE GREEK
LANGUAGE-NOTES, CRITICAL AND EXPLANA-

TORY-AND AN IMPROVED LEXICON.

BY

REV. PETER BULLIONS, D.D.,

LETE PROFESSOR OF LANGUAGES IN THE ALBANY ACADEMY; AND ACAOR C
THE SERIES OF GRAMMARS, GREEK, LATIN, AND ENGLISH,

ON THE SAME PLAX, ETC. ETC.

THIRTY-FOURTH EDITION, REVISED,

NEW YORK:
PRATT, OAKLEY & COMPANY

21 MURRAY STREET.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year eighteen hundred and anty-three, do

PETER BULLIONS,
Ole Clerk's Office of the Northern District of New-yuin.

PREFACE.

Taus work has been prepared especially for the convenience of those who rise the author's Greek Grammar. The object aimed at is, to furnish to the attentive student the means of solving readily every difficulty he meets with in his preparations, by referring him to that part of the Grammar in which the necessary explanation is contained, and to supply him with that assistance at his desk or in his room, for which he might otherwise have to apply to his teacher. In this way the teacher is relieved from much labor and interruption while engaged in other duties, much time is saved to the student, and he is gradually led to a thorough and practical acquaintance with the grammatical structure and idioms of the language.

This work is on the plan of the Latin Reader, published two years ago, and which has been so favorably received by the public. It contains a similar Introduction on the leading idioms of the Greek language, so arranged that reference to any part is easy, and is constantly made in notes at the foot of each page. The Introductory course consists of two parts:

- First, Exercises in Etymology, beginning with those of the most simple character, and, following the order of arrangement in the Grammar, supplying ample means of drilling on the various forms of inflection, contraction, and euphonic changes which words undergo ;-Secondly, Exercises in Syntax, consisting of easy sentences, from Classic authors, intended to illustrate, and, by repetition, to render familiar the rules and leading principles of Greek Syntax in regular order. By due attention to this part of the work, pupils will soon become familiar with the forms of words, and the construction of the language, and be prepared to enter, with much greater advan'age, on the reading course which follows.

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The text, from page 91 to page 160, is the same as the corresponding part of Jacobs' Greek Reader, with the addition of a few Æsopic fables. Instead of the Compilation on Geography, and the Extracts from Plutarch, which occupy the remainder of that work, there have been substituted here, a few selections from the Incredibilia of Palæphatus,-“ Counsels to the Young,” from the epistle of Isocrates to Demonicus—“ Evidences of design in Creation and Providence," and the “Choice of Hercules," from the Memorabilia of Socrates, and a few extracts from the First book of Xenophon's Anabăsis, containing an account of the leading events in that expedition up to the death of Cyrus. In the poetical extracts, those from Homer have been omitted, as properly belonging to a more advanced stage of the student's course, and a few additional odes from Anacreon have been inserted. These extracts have been preferred to those for which they have been substituted, both on account of their being more simple, and consequently more suitable for students at an early stage of their studies, and also on account of their intrinsic excellence.

In the numerous references to the Grammar, and to the Introduction on Greek Idioms at the foot of each page, the diligent student will find more important and useful aid than could be furnished by many pages of “ Notes." With ordinary attention to these he can hardly fail to acquire a thorough knowledge of the principles of the language in a comparatively short time, and be prepared to prosecute his future course with more advantage and pleasure. In the references, at the foot of each page, those preceded by a section mark ($) refer to the Section in the Grammar and its subdivisions indicated. In those not preceded by such a mark the first number directs to the corresponding number in the Introduction, and the second to the example under that number. Thus for example, 29. 1, directs to the example, rò còv pôvov dupnju, page 16, and shows how the possessive pronoun is to be rendered in such phrases.

As a further assistance to the pupil, “ Notes,” partly original and parıly selected, have been prepared, explanatory of such difficulties as would be apt to impede his course, and to these reference is made in the text, by numbers corresponding to the numbers in the Notes on each page. In preparing these a proper medium has been aimed at, that they might not be, on the one hand, so meagre as to be of little use, nor, on the other, so copious as to supersede mental effort on the part of the student. They are designed, not to carry him passively through the difficulties in his way, but, to furnish such suggestions as will enable him, by a proper exercise of his own powers, to master these difficulties for himself.

In the Lexicon appended, the derivation and composition of words have been given so far as they could be ascertained with certainty. In simplo verbs, the root or stem is specified. The quantity of doubtful

rowels before a simple consonant is marked where there appeared to be any danger of mistake ; but before a vowel they are to be considered short or doubtful, unless where marked otherwise. The primary and leading meaning of each word is given first, and after that, its secondary and more remote or figurative meanings, in their order, so far as the brevity required in such a compend would admit. In all these, Donnegan's Greek Lexicon, and Anthon's Lexicon to Jacobs' Greek Reader, have been chiefly relied on as authorities.

No pains have been spared to ensure accuracy as well as beauty ial the typographical execution of the work. On this point it is only justice to say that much credit is due to A. H. Guernsey, A. M., who has, with great care, and a thorough knowledge of the subject, revised the proofsheets as the work advanced.

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