Selected Poems of W. H. Auden

Copertina anteriore
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 13 feb 2007 - 384 pagine
This significantly expanded edition of W. H. Auden’s Selected Poems adds twenty poems to the hundred in the original edition, broadening its focus to better reflect the enormous wealth of form, rhetoric, tone, and content in Auden’s work. Newly included are such favorites as “Funeral Blues” and other works that represent Auden’s lighter, comic side, giving a fuller picture of the range of his genius. Also new are brief notes explaining references that may have become obscure to younger generations of readers and a revised introduction that draws on recent additions to knowledge about Auden.

As in the original edition, the new Selected Poems makes available the preferred original versions of some thirty poems that Auden revised later in life, making it the best source for enjoying the many facets of Auden’s art in one volume.
 

Sommario

Who stands the crux left of the watershed
3
From the very first coming down
4
Control of the passes was he saw the key
5
Watch any day his nonchalant pauses see
6
Will you turn a deaf ear
7
Sir no mans enemy forgiving
8
It was Easter as I walked in the public gardens
9
Consider this and in our time
16
Mundus et Infans
132
The Lesson
134
The Sea and the Mirror
136
Noon
180
Under Which Lyre
182
The Fall of Rome
188
In Praise of Limestone
189
A Household
192

This lunar beauty
17
To ask the hard question is simple
18
Doom is dark and deeper than any seadingle
20
Whats in your mind my dove my coney
21
Though aware of our rank and alert to obey orders
22
O Love the interest itself in thoughtless Heaven
26
O what is that sound which so thrills the ear
27
Hearing of harvests rotting in the valleys
29
upon its glittering lake
37
Look stranger at this island
43
Journey to Iceland
49
Johnny
58
Dover
64
In Time of
72
The Capital
86
Museé des Beaux Arts
87
Epitaph on a Tyrant
88
Refugee Blues
91
The Unknown Citizen
93
Calypso
94
September 1 1939
95
Law say the gardeners is the
98
In Memory of Sigmund Freud
100
Epithalamium
103
Eyes look into the well
104
Song for St Cecilias Day
106
The Quest
108
But I Cant
119
In Sickness and in Health
120
Leap Before You Look
123
Jumbled in the common box
124
Atlantis
125
At the Grave of Henry James
128
Song
193
A Walk After Dark
194
Memorial for the City
196
Under Sirius
201
Their Lonely Betters
203
Fleet Visit
205
The Shield of Achilles
206
The WillowWren and the Stare
208
Epitaph for the Unknown Soldier
209
Nocturne II
210
Bucolics
211
Horae Canonicae
224
Homage to Clio
240
The Old Mans Road
243
The Song
244
First Things First 194 243
245
The More Loving
246
Fridays Child
247
Goodbye to the Mezzogiorno
249
Dame Kind
252
You
254
98
256
After Reading a Childs Guide to Modern Physics
257
100
258
IOI Et in Arcadia Ego
261
Thanksgiving for a Habitat
262
104
290
Prologue at Sixty
297
August 1968
304
A Shock
312
A Note on the Text
321
Index of Titles and First Lines
335
Copyright

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Informazioni sull'autore (2007)

W. H. Auden (1907-73) was born in York, England, and educated at Oxford. During the 1930s he was the leader of a left-wing literary group that included Christopher Isherwood and Stephen Spender. With Isherwood he wrote three verse plays. He lived in Germany during the early days of Nazism, and was a stretcher-bearer for the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War. Auden's first volume of poetry appeared in 1930. Later volumes include Spain (1937), New Year Letter (1941), For the Time Being, a Christmas Oratorio (1945), The Age of Anxiety (1947; Pulitzer Prize), Nones (1951), The Shield of Achilles (1955), Homage to Clio (1960), About the House (1965), Epistle of a Godson (1972), and Thank You, Fog (1974). His other works include the libretto, with his companion Chester Kallman, for Stravinsky's opera The Rake's Progress (1953); A Certain World: A Commonplace Book (1970); and The Dyer's Hand and Other Essays (1968). In 1939 Auden moved to the United States and became a citizen in 1946, and beginning that year taught at a number of American colleges and universities. From 1956 to 1961 he was professor of poetry at Oxford. Subsequently he lived in a number of countries, including Italy and Austria, and in 1971 he returned to England. He was awarded the National Medal for Literature in 1967.

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