Immagini della pagina
PDF
ePub
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Auerbur

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

THE GALLIC WAR.

BOOK I.

INTRODUCTION: Description of Gaul (Chap. 1).

THE HELVETIAN WAR.- Orgetorix, an Helvetian chief, plans the invasion of Gaul: he conspires with the chiefs of several Gallic tribes; is brought to trial, escapes, and is put under the ban; soon afterwards dies (2-4). The Helvetians complete their preparations, and gather near the Rhone, requesting leave to pass peaceably through the Province. Cæsar delays them by pretexts, while he hastily throws up an earthwork to prevent their crossing the river. They attempt the passage, but are repulsed (5-8). Forming a league with the Sequani, they penetrate and ravage the territory of the Ædui, friends of Rome, who solicit protection. Cæsar, levying a force of upwards of 30,000, overtakes and cuts to pieces their rear-guard (Tigurini), at the crossing of the Arar (9-12). An embassy of the Helvetians, headed by the aged Divico, leads to no result. A cavalry skirmish, in which the Romans are worsted, together with the delay of supplies, shows the bad faith of a party among the Ædui, headed by Dumnorix; who is arrested, but spared on the intercession of his brother Divitiacus, and put under close guard by Cæsar (13-20). Cæsar makes preparations for attack, but is prevented by a false alarm, and moves towards Bibracte. The Helvetians, now well in advance, turn about for battle. They are forced to retreat to a hill, and attempt to flank the Romans; but are completely routed, and fly towards the north (21-26). They are at length forced to surrender. Six thousand escape, but are retaken, and put to death. The remainder are compelled to return to Helvetia, and rebuild the villages which they had destroyed (27-29).

THE WAR WITH ARIOVISTUS.· - The chief populations of Gaul seek terms of amity, representing the condition of the country, especially under the invasions of the German Ariovistus, by whom the Sequani are chiefly oppressed (30-33). Cæsar sends envoys

« IndietroContinua »