An Inquiry Into the Poor Laws: Chiefly with a View to Examine Them as a Scheme of National Benevolence, and to Elucidate Their Political Economy

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R. Hunter, 1824 - 162 pagine
 

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Pagina 46 - ... competent sums of money for and towards the necessary relief of the lame, impotent, old, blind and such other among them being poor and not able to work...
Pagina 138 - Now, in the present state, all which we enjoy, and a great part of what we suffer, is put in our own power. For pleasure and pain are the consequences of our actions ; and we are endued by the Author of our nature with capacities of foreseeing these consequences.
Pagina 46 - ... (by taxation of every inhabitant and every occupier of lands in the said parish in such competent sum and sums of money as they shall think fit) a convenient stock of flax, hemp, wool, thread, iron, and other necessary ware and stuff to set the poor on work...
Pagina 48 - ... for setting to work all such persons, married or unmarried, having no means to maintain them , and use no ordinary and daily trade of life to get their living by...
Pagina 144 - Commentaries, remarks, that this law of Nature being coeval with mankind and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries, and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid derive all their force and all their validity and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Pagina 68 - ... one shall remain in the custody of the parson, vicar, or curate, and the other two in the custody of the churchwardens...
Pagina 139 - I know not that we have any one kind or degree of enjoyment, but by the means of our own actions. And by prudence and care we may, for the most part, pass our days in tolerable ease and quiet ; or, on the contrary, we may, by rashness, ungoverned passion, willfulness, or even by negligence, make ourselves as miserable as ever we please.
Pagina 30 - This season gave jovial ecclesiastics an opportunity of trying different countries. An Archbishop of York, in 1321, seems to have carried a train of two hundred persons who were maintained at the expense of the abbeys on his road, and to have hunted with a pack of hounds from parish to parish.
Pagina 6 - ... a most unspeakable oppression to poor tenants (who if they give not bread, or some kind of provision to perhaps forty such villains in one day, are sure to be insulted by them) but they rob many poor people who live in houses distant from any neighbourhood. In years of plenty...
Pagina 48 - Children; and also for setting to work all such Persons, married or unmarried, having no Means to maintain them, and use no ordinary and daily Trade of Life to get their Living by...

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