Avian Navigation: Pigeon Homing as a Paradigm

Copertina anteriore
Springer Science & Business Media, 12 gen 2005 - 229 pagine

How migratory birds can navigate home from their wintering grounds to their breeding sites over hundreds and thousands of kilometres has been an admired mystery over more than a century. Profound advances towards a solution of this problem have been achieved with a model bird, the homing pigeon. This monograph summarizes our current knowledge about pigeon homing, about the birds' application of a sun compass and a magnetic compass, of a visual topographical map within a familiar area and -- most surprisingly -- of an olfactory map using atmospheric chemosignals as indicators of position in distant unfamiliar areas.

 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Nessuna recensione trovata nei soliti posti.

Sommario

Introduction
1
Why Investigate Domestic Homing Pigeons?
2
On Terms and Definitions
4
Observation Data Used to Investigate Pigeon Homing
7
Homing Performance
11
Homing Routes
12
Recoveries
14
Cage Experiments
16
OutwardJourney Detours
104
Natural Olfactory Misguidance
105
Spatial Range and Variability of OlfactionBased Homing
107
Temporal Variability
110
Varying Home Site Conditions in Aviary Experiments
111
Applying Artificial Odours and Winds
118
A Digression to the Preferred Compass Direction PCD
119
Spatial Structures in the Chemical Atmosphere
120

Basic Features of Pigeon Homing
17
Homing of Inexperienced Pigeons
18
The Problem of Motivation
23
Limited Significance of Exercise Flights at Home
26
Experience Gained by Homing Flights
29
Number and Range of Previous Homing Flights
30
Directions of Previous Homing Flights
33
Familiarity with the Release Site or Area
36
Temporal Variability
38
Aperiodic Fluctuations
41
Accuracy of Homeward Orientation
42
Geographical Variability
43
Distraction by Landscape Configurations
44
Stochastic Noise
46
Multiple and Mobile Home Sites
47
Conclusions and Perspectives
48
Motivation Selection and Homing Experience
50
Inaccuracy and Variability of Homing Orientation
51
Potential Input Signals Exploitable for HomeFinding
53
Indicators of Position
54
The Role of the Sun
59
Linkage Between Sun Compass and Map
64
Orientation Under Overcast Skies
66
Conclusions and Perspectives
68
The Role of the Geomagnetic Field
69
Magnetic Fields Before Release
73
Geomagnetic Irregularities
77
Temporal Magnetic Fluctuations
78
The Interference with the Stress Issue
79
The Magnetic Compass Issue
80
The Magnetic Map Issue
81
The Path Integration Issue
82
Overall Conclusions and Outlook
85
The Role of the Chemical Atmosphere
87
Olfactory Nerve Section
88
Inactivation of the Olfactory Epithelium by Zinc Sulphate
92
Nasal Anaesthesia
93
Occlusion of Nostrils
94
Insertion of Nasal Tubes
96
Air from Different Environments
99
Olfactory Misguidance
101
Gradients in Ratios of Trace Gases
123
Applicability of Atmospheric Gradients to Navigation
128
Assumed Dependence on Geographical Peculiarities
131
The Short DistanceLong Distance Problem
133
Avian Olfactory Perception A Suitable Tool for Navigation?
136
The Problem of Odour Discrimination
137
The Problem of AdaptationHabituation
138
Potential NonSpecific Side Effects
139
Inconsistent Results
140
Conclusions and Perspectives
143
How Does Olfactory Navigation Operate?
144
Unsolved Problems Remaining Challenges
146
The Role of the Visual Landscape
149
Downgrading of Visual Signals
152
Homing with Olfaction and Vision Impaired
153
Interrelations Between Landscape and Sun Compass
155
The Landscape as a Disturbing Factor
157
Conclusions and Perspectives
159
The Neural Bases of Pigeon Homing
161
The Hippocampus and the Olfactory Map
165
The Piriform Cortex and the Olfactory Map
166
Roles of Other Brain Regions and Hemispheric Lateralization
167
10 Homing in Other Birds
169
Compass Orientation and Preferred Compass Directions
171
GoalOriented Navigation
173
Homing in Natural Life
176
NonMigratory Excursions
177
Homing as a Constituent of Bird Migration
179
Conclusions and Perspectives
181
Research History Blind Alleys and an Unexpected Passage
183
Overall Synthesis and Perspective
187
Two Homing Mechanisms
188
Challenges for Future Research
189
Problems of Visual Landscape Orientation
190
Problems of Olfactory Navigation
191
124 Outlook
192
Notes on Selected Particulars
195
References
205
Subject Index
225
Copyright

Altre edizioni - Visualizza tutto

Parole e frasi comuni

Riferimenti a questo libro

Informazioni sull'autore (2005)

Dr. Hans G. Wallraff was scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioural Physiology who investigated navigation and orientation of birds over almost 50 years.

Informazioni bibliografiche