Immagini della pagina
PDF

themselves to this work, have a field of labour around them to which their physical powers are utterly unequal; and perhaps the excitement naturally produced by this state of things may have been among those second causes which have led to too great exertion on the part of those who have learned to feel deeply for the wretchedness of their Heathen Neighbours. Mr. Davey's feelings on this subject are thus expressed in his Report of the District with which he is charged, made to his Brethren at Christmas. He says— It requires no small share of faith and patience, under the labours more abundant laid upon me, to remember, that for want of assistance I am prevented from giving either the Inhabitants of this or the other Villages in this District, that attention which, as a Messenger, Watchman, and Steward of the Lord, I am enjoined to give, in feeding the Lord's Family, and :* the sheep of Christ scattered abroad in this naughty world. Far be it from me, my Dear Brethren, to be the cause of your relinquishing a single post which we already occupy, if it shall be considered by you that our strength is such as to warrant our continuing to labour at it: but I would rather suggest the propriety of conducting a few Stations on an effectual plan, than ineffectually to aim at supplying many. I should rejoice to see every Station of this Colony occupied, and excursions made in the surrounding country: but neither can be done, till we are very much re-inforced in numbers. In the mean time, it is highly important, I humbly conceive, to concentrate our exertions as much as possible: perhaps for want of this, in times past, our efforts have not been so productive as, humanly speaking, they might have been. Mr. Davey adds— Although it may not appear to be part of my Report, yet I am constrained to notice, with humble gratitude to the Father of all Mercies, the very timely arrival of our dear Brethren on the 9th instant. May their lives be spared, their talents imi proved, their zeal employed, and their love abound, to the glory of God! May we, my Dear Brethren, rejoice with trembling, cease from men, and be kept from resting upon the creature! May we look alone to the Lord of the Harvest, not only to send forth Labourers, but also to preserve those La; bourers, and make them wise men that need not to be ashamed: May grace be imparted to us all, day by day, to make us stedfast, unmoreable, airays abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that it shall not be in rain in the Lord! *...* Since the Anniversary Meeting, the Annual Report of the

West-Africa Mission, drawn up by the Rev. C. L. F. Haensel, has been received; and is printed in the Appendix, No. II. p. 142.

MEDITERRANEAN MISSION.
Malta.

THE arrival at Malta of the Rev. C. F. Schlienz, the Rev. Dr. Korck, and Mr. John Kitto, together with the departure of Mr. Peter Brenner for this Station, has been already mentioned.

The individuals connected with the Mission at Malta are, besides Mr. Jowett and his family, Mr. Schlienz, Mr. Koelner, Mr. Kitto, Mr. Brenner, and Mrs. Andrews. Mr. Jowett and Mr. Schlienz are occupied in the preparation of Publications; Mr. Koelner and Mr.' Kitto in the Printing Office; and Mr. Brenner is designed to assist Mr. Jowett in the secular concerns of the Mission, especially those connected with the Press. The house occupied at Valetta having been found too small for the increasing business of the Mission, another has been engaged, which is large and commodious, very airy and cool, and situated in a quiet street. The Printing Establishment has two large rooms; and accommodation is afforded for all the Members of the Mission.

Mr. Jowett is engaged in a Greek Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistle to the Romans. Mr. Schlienz, with the aid of Phares Shidiak, an Arabic Youth, is preparing, in Arabic, a Commentary on the Parables. Ysa Petros has completed, at Jerusalem, an Arabic Translation of the Pilgrim's Progress. Various considerable works are printing in Italian and in Greek; and Arabic Tracts, with a large quantity of Translations, are ready for the Press.

On the subject of Arabic Translations, Mr. Jowett remarks—

Arabic, as you will perceive from the demands of our Brethren in Egypt and Syria, is likely to occupy a large share

of our attention. Should Providence smile upon our Oriental

Translations, I see no limits to our Arabic Works for many years to come: in fact, I see no limits at all. However, I would not indulge a presumptuous spirit: He, whom we serve, alone knows how far it will be good for us to proceed

in any of our best-intentioned undertakings: we can only say, If the Lord will, we shall live, and do this or that.

The Press did not come into effective operation till January 1825. The following Abstract of its labours for three years, to the end of 1827, has been sent home by Mr. Jowett:—

ITALIAN. Copier.

Abdool Messia . . . . . . ................... ... 1000
Select Stories (Two Editions) .......... - -
First Six Centuries, abridged from Milner ... -500

Conversion of Augustine ...... - - - - - - - - - - - - 1000
The City of God, by ditto.......... - - - - - - - - 500
Meditations. . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... 1500
Life of Swartz......... - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . 1500
Hale's Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000

[blocks in formation]

Distri. On

buted. hand. ... 358 .. 642 ... 824 .. 676 ... 466 .. 34

... 988 . . 12 ... 500 .. • ... 645 .. 855. ... 1268 . . 232

- 90.1 .. 99 ... 132 ... 368 ... 147 ... 353 . . . 262 .. 48 ... 102 ... 398

... 133 ... 367 ... 646 ... 104 ... 223 .. 777 - - ... ... 1000

13,500 7535 5965 Greek. Short Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. 1000 ... 1000 .. -Short History of Three Centuries........... 1500 . . . 1232 . . 268 Nine Dialogues . . . . . . . . . . . --- - - - ... ...... 1000 .. 877 ... 123 Meditations (Two Editions).... 2000 ... 1120 ... 880 Nature and Grace ......... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1000 . . 996 . . 4 Hale's Rules ... . . . . . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ... 1000 . . 836 ... 164 Life of David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - ... 1000 .. 644 ... 356 Baxter's Call (abridged)... - - - - - - - ... 1000 .. 744 .. 256 Commentary on Acts... 1000 . . 246 .. 754 Church at Ephesus..... . 1000 ... 364 .. 636 Ditto at Athens........ . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - ... 1000 . . 494 .. 506 Ditto at Thessalonica...................... 1000 .. 533 .. 467 Converted Jailor ........ . . . . . . ... 1000 .. 523 . . 477 Abdool Messia...... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1000 ... 334 .. 666 Tract on Education ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000 . . 219 .. 781 Philanthropos : Jan. to Dec. 1826 ... ::::... 1000 . . 925 .. 75 Philanthropic Gazette: Jan. to June 1827... 500 .. 450 .. 50 18,000 11,537 - 6463 ARABIC. Primer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - ... 1000 ... 1000 . . -Primer, and Sermon on the Mount . . . . . . . . . 1000 ... 1000 .. -Primer,Proverbs, & Lokmann's Fables..(2.Ed.) 5500 ... 1215 .. 4285 Primer, and Scripture Texts........ . . . . . . . . 500 . . 500 .. - Sermon on the Mount..................... 2000 .. 2000 .. St. Peter's Epistles..... ... 1000 ... 1000 . . -St. John's Epistles ... . 1000 ... 1000 . . -Green's Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1000 . . 975 . . 25 Dialogue between a Traveller and Yourself... 1500 ... 1450 .. 50 Dairyman's Daughter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1750 .. 755 . . 995 Prayers for Morning and Evening, for every day in the week..... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .... 500 .. 421 .. 79 Life of William Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 1750 ... 1164 .. 586 Dr. Watts's First Catechism for Children .... 2000 ... 1232 .. 768 Life and Death of Rev. Pliny Fisk......... . 500 . . 150 . 350 The End of Time......... -- ... 500 . . . . .. 500 Acts, the Second Chapter... ... 1000 ... 1000 . -Address to Children.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 . . . . . . 500 23,000 14,862 8138 sumi MARY. Total Total Total of Copies - - - remainting in Languages. of: so, o

Italian ..... .....| 13,500 7535 5965

Greek ..........] 18,000 11,537 6463

Arabic........ ..] 23,000 14,862 8138

Total......... 54,500 33,934 20,566

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

In a recent Letter, Mr. Jowett requests to be furnished, as early as possible, with founts of Ethiopic and Amharic Types: he also states that Mr. Schlienz was about to prepare an Amharic Spelling Book, with Reading Lessons from the New Testament.

It will be heard with pleasure, that the British and Foreign Bible Society is now printing the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles, in Amharic and Ethiopic.

Turkey and Greece.

The Rev. John Hartley's visit to Malta at the beginning of last year, and his return to Constantinople, were noticed in the last Report. Early in June, he removed to the Island of Prinkipo, in the Sea of Marmora, for the purpose of intercourse with Mr. Brewer, one of the American Missionaries; and, in July, he accompanied Mr. Brewer to Smyrna. Dr. Korck, whose arrival at Malta has been noticed, left that place on the 11th of August for Smyrna, where he joined Mr. Hartley on the 26th. During his residence at Smyrna, he was engaged in the study of Turkish, and the circulation of the Scriptures and Tracts. His health had for some time been declining; but appears, from the last accounts, somewhat better.

Mr. Hartley's chief reason for removing to Smyrna was, that he might take the place of the Rev. Mr. Arundel, the Chaplain to the British Factory, in order to enable that Gentleman to visit England: but circumstances occurring to prevent his visit, Mr. Hartley engaged in a Modern-Greek Service every Sunday, in the Chapel of the Dutch Consulate.

The last Report noticed the painfully affecting condition of the Jews who had confessed Christ at Constantinople. Full particulars have been given in the Missionary Register (pp. 205,210, and 328, 329,) by which it will be seen, that, while one of them has returned to Judaism, the others have been enabled, by Divine Grace, to remain firm in avowing themselves disciples of Jesus of Nazareth, and have witnessed a good confession. There seems but little hope of the termination of their sufferings: on this subject Mr. Hartley writes—

The two Converts, John B. Castro and John Cohen, are still faithful. They have suffered six months' imprisonment for the sake of Christ; but we have great reason to fear that they will either be delivered into the hands of the Jews, or have their imprisonment perpetuated. In a subsequent Letter he remarks— I have not the shadow of hope that they will ever emerge from the walls of their prison. The diabolical hatred of the Jews against Jesus of Nazareth, the deadly hostility which the Turks at present cherish against the English, and doubtless the malice of that Evil Spirit who is the original source of all sin—these are all combined to effect the ruin of our suffering friends. He afterwards adds— Men, who enjoy all the rights, the privileges, and the comforts of England, can form no conception of the weight of misery which crushes the human race in these unhappy countries. My heart is sick with the habitual instances of flagrant injustice which pass within my observation. Do not imagine that the sufferings of the two Converts are a solitary example. It appears, from Mr. Hartley's communications, that many other Jews have secretly embraced the Christian Faith. The state of things at Constantinople is thus noticed by Mr. Hartley, in a Letter written in the month

of June— The Roman Catholics are exceedingly violent. A young Roman Catholic from Poland visits me continually, and is embracing the truth in a very zealous manner. Ever since I came, I have been engaged, as much as I could attend to, in conversation, reading, and prayer, with Greeks and Catholics, Jews and Armenians: thus has some seed been scattered ; but we must earnestly entreat God to bring about a great change: without this, there will be but little good done. The sale of Books is but little: we distribute, however, a considerable number, not without hopes of benefit. Send me a moderate supply of Greek Books. We must, if possible, do something for Bucharest. I am informed that 30 Jews Were ...i there, not long since, by the Greeks. Besides the public exercise of his MIN 1stity at Smyrna, Mr. Hartley has pursued his accustomed plan of private instruction. Of his proceedings he gives the following account, in September:— I have found opportunities of visiting families from house to house, to a considerable extent; and I have given o: instruction in religion to some of the younger individuals of the Dutch Congregation. Amongst the Greeks, I have had the

« IndietroContinua »