The North American Review, Volume 61

Copertina anteriore
Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, Henry Cabot Lodge, James Russell Lowell
O. Everett, 1845
Vols. 227-230, no. 2 include: Stuff and nonsense, v. 5-6, no. 8, Jan. 1929-Aug. 1930.
 

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Pagina 13 - ... to hold forth a lively experiment, that a most flourishing civil state may stand and best be maintained, and that among our English subjects, with a full liberty in religious concernments...
Pagina 479 - Live! fear no heavier chastisement from me, Thou noteless blot on a remembered name! But be thyself, and know thyself to be!
Pagina 279 - Anon out of the earth a fabric huge Rose, like an exhalation, with the sound Of dulcet symphonies and voices sweet, Built like a temple, where pilasters round Were set, and Doric pillars overlaid With golden architrave ; nor did there want Cornice or frieze with bossy sculptures graven ; The roof was fretted gold.
Pagina 483 - It puts the individual for the species, the one above the infinite many, might before right. A lion hunting a flock of sheep or a herd of wild asses, is a more poetical object than they ; and we even take part with the lordly beast, because our vanity, or some other feeling, makes us disposed to place ourselves in the situation of the strongest party.
Pagina 477 - How, indeed, it could ever be doubted that thought is only of the conditioned, may well be deemed a matter of the profoundest admiration. Thought cannot transcend consciousness; consciousness is only possible under the antithesis of a subject and object of thought, known only in correlation, and mutually limiting each other...
Pagina 515 - The Miscellaneous Works of Thomas Arnold, DD Late Head Master of Rugby School and Regius Professor of Modern History in the Univ. of Oxford.
Pagina 482 - The language of poetry naturally falls in with the language of power. The imagination is an exaggerating and exclusive faculty: it takes from one thing to add to another: it accumulates circumstances together to give the greatest possible effect to a favourite object. The understanding is a dividing and measuring faculty: it judges of things not according to their immediate impression on the mind, but according to their relations to one another. The one is a...
Pagina 517 - A Dictionary of the English Language, containing the Pronunciation, Etymology, and Explanation of all Words authorized by Eminent Writers. To which are added, a Vocabulary of the Roots of English Words, and an accented list of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names.
Pagina 465 - ... and odours, and dews and clear waters, and soft airs and sounds, and bright skies, and woodland solitudes, and moonlight bowers, which are the Material elements of Poetry — and that fine sense of their undefinable relation to mental emotion, which is its essence and vivifying Soul — and which, in the midst of Shakespeare's most busy and atrocious scenes...
Pagina 268 - The Czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at 10 o'clock and 6 at night, is very seldom at home a whole day, very often in the king's yard or by water, dressed in several dresses. The king is expected there this day, the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in. The king pays for all he has...

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