James Joyce and the Language of History: Dedalus's Nightmare

Copertina anteriore
Oxford University Press, 29 set 1994 - 208 pagine
"History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Stephen Dedalus's famous complaint articulates a characteristic modern attitude toward the perceived burden of the past. As Robert Spoo shows in this study, Joyce's creative achievement, from the time of his sojourn in Rome in 1906-07 to the completion of Ulysses in 1922, cannot be understood apart from the ferment of historical thought that dominated the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Tracing James Joyce's historiographic art to its formative contexts, Spoo reveals a modernist author passionately engaged with the problem of history, forging a new language that both dramatizes and redefines that problem.
 

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Sommario

INTRODUCTION
3
Rome 19067
14
A Metahistorical Reading of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
38
3 Teleology Monocausality and Marriage in Ulysses
66
History Language Intertextuality
89
5 Aeolus Rhetoric and History
113
Oxen of the Sun Circe and Beyond
135
NOTES
163
INDEX
187
Copyright

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