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tendence which they exercise over them, merits the approbation of the Committee. The pupils, who are 31 in number, besides being instructed in i. doctrines of Christianity, are taught the English and Tamul Languages, and receive lessons in: Geography and History. Native Ciphering is also a subject of their study; and, when they are thoroughly grounded in it, the Missionaries intend to direct their attention to European Arithmetic. The general character of the Students is pleasing, and presents an agreeable prospect of their future usefulness. But the Committee notice, with peculiar delight, the pleasing effects which the devotional and ...; exercises of the Missionaries have been the means of producing on the Seminarists: of whom at least twenty appear to have become true converts to Christianity; and to have evinced, by their conduct, the sincerity of their profession. Mr. Schmid gives the following statement of the daily occupations of the Seminarists, from which it will be seen that they are kept in vigorous and useful employ:— At day-break, they rise; and afterward labour nearly an hour in the garden, for which purpose we have given them a piece of ground to cultivate according to their own taste— then, for a short time, they learn hymns—about seven o'clock, we have Family Prayer with them; and they are exercised, by Br. Rhenius, in singing from notes—at eight, they go to the Central School, where they commit to memory various little tasks—at nine, 14 of them have a lesson in arithmetic, on European principles; and the younger of them attend the Central School, where the Sermon on the Mount, and (every second day) Aveyar's Sentences, are dictated in the sand, and committed to memory—at ten, all are in the Central School, either learning by heart our printed Catetechism and Psalms, or having spelling-lessons—from eleven till twelve, they have English Writing-exercises three days in the week, and three days Native Ciphering—from twelve till one, they have the proper reading-lesson in the School; and a part of the time I employ in explaining, successively, the books which are committed to memory—from one till two, they have their dinner and recreation—from two till three, they are employed in the School—from three till five, they have Tamul Writing-exercises on paper, and English Lessons—from five till half-past-five, they learn a Manual for Catechumens by heart, and attend the instructions which Br. Rhenius gives to the Catechumens—after which, except the Evening Family-prayer at half-past-seven, when Br. Rhenius reads L

and expounds, the evening is at their own disposal; and they carefully employ it in reading and committing to memory, some of them till a late hour. The opportunities for distributing PUBLICATIONs, both in the vicinity of the Station and in Journeys, are abundant. In reference to this subject, the following passage occurs in the Report of the Corresponding Committee:— Regarding the Distribution of Tracts, the Missionaries

make these judicious and gratifying remarks— These Tracts have been scattered in all parts of this Province, among Heathens, Moormen, Itoman Catholics, and Protestants: and, though some of them have been abused, either from enmity to the cause or from wantonness—for what good thing is not exposed to abuse !—yet there are many proofs, that most of them have been and are well used. They have excited the minds of many to inquire about religion : many have been pleased with the truths contained in them; and, from some places in the most distant corners of the district, persons, having heard of them, have come and requested copies. They have come into the hands of females as well as males—among the mountains, and on the plains— in public places of resort; and in others, from which superstition and custom have excluded the feet of strangers, or those of different castes. Idiomatically, clearly, and soberly-written Tracts, are well accepted of the people in general; and are an excellent auxiliary to the Preacher of the Gospel, both preparing his way before him, and making his footsteps to be remembered after him. May Providence enable us to do still more, in this department, next year! - The following Resolution of the Corresponding Committee sufficiently attests their cordial approbation of the proceedings of the Missio

Ilaries :- Resolved, That a Letter be addressed to the Missionaries in Tinnevelly, expressive of the Committee's satisfaction at the accounts of the state of their Mission, the Schools, and the Seminary; and encouraging them to persevere in their assiduous endeavours for rendering their Mission ablessing alike to the Christian and Heathen population of the country. .

TRAVANCORE.

At Cotym, Cochin, and Allepie, among the Syrians and their neighbours, Mr. Bailey, Mr. Fenn, Mr. Baker, and Mr. Norton have pursued their steady course, when not interrupted by sickness; by which, however, they have not unfrequently been hindered. The last reports, indeed, from this Mission have awakened the fears of the Committee, lest a serious interruption should be thus occasioned to their labours. They have long wished to strengthen the hands of the Missionaries by additional help ; and greatly regret that they have been prevented from doing this. With much pleasure, therefore, they have appointed, as before stated, the Rev. Joseph Beddy and the Rev. Samuel Ridsdale for service in this part of India; and they hope, at no distant period, to despatch others to this quarter. The following Resolution of the Madras Committee, while it attests their view of the favourable state of the Mission, forcibly indicates the want of additional aid:— Resolved, That a Letter be written to the Missionaries at Cotym, expressive of the Committee's great satisfaction at the state of their Mission, as described in their recent Reports— assuring them of the continued entire confidence and approbation of the Committee—and encouraging them to pursue their various plans of usefulness with unabated diligence; depending rather on themselves and their own resources, than upon any uncertain additional help from home, where the difficulties experienced by the Parent Society in procuring suitable English Missionaries appear to be so great, as to discourage the expectation of any addition being speedily made to the establishment at Cotym. The Committee, however, will draw the attention of the Society again to the importance of endeavouring to meet the wishes of the Missionaries for additional co-adjutors there, and the nomination of a Missionary for Cochin. The Members will hear with pleasure, that mutual confidence and regard continue, unimpaired, between the Syrian Church and the Missionaries." The improvement of that interesting body of Christians, under their devout and exemplary Metropolitan and the fostering care of Colonel Newall the British Resident, is proceeding steadily, by the blessing of God on the assiduous labours of the Missionaries. The maintenance of such entire harmony, between the Syrians and a body of Clergymen of another Communion whose avowed object is their reformation, while it must be viewed with thankfulness to Him who has graciously bestowed the blessing, yet cannot but be regarded as indicating on both sides a large measure of true wisdom and charity. The Rev.

Mr. Mill, Principal of Bishop's College, Calcutta, in a Journey which he took round the Peninsula in the year 1822, spent some time among the Syrians. His testimony to the spirit and measures of the Missionaries will be heard with pleaSure :- The persons to whom I was chiefly indebted for my intercourse both with the Priests and Laity of this extraordinary people (of whose Indian language I was wholly ignorant), were three Clergymen of the Church of England resident at Cotym, in Travancore; and actively employed in superintending the College and the Parochial Schools; the former of which, by the grant of the Heathen Government of that country, the latter, by the desire and contribution of these Christians themselves, have been recently established in their community. Singular as such superintendence may appear, and almost unprecedented, there is nothing in it, as exercised by these Clergymen, which opposes the order, either of that Episcopal Church which they visit, or, as far as I am capable of judging, of that to which they themselves belong.

Of the considerate and candid spirit maintained toward the Syrian Church by the Missionaries, Mr. Mill thus speaks:—

They do nothing but by the express sanction of the Metropolitan consulting and employing them: their use of the Anglican Service, for themselves and families at one of his . . Chapels, is agreeable to the practice of these Christians (who allowed the same 250 years ago to the Portuguese Priests, as to persons rightly and canonically ordained, even while they were resisting their usurpations), and is totally unconnected with any purpose of obtruding even that Liturgy upon the Syrian Church : while their conduct with respect to those parts of the Syrian Ritual and Practice, which all Protestants must condemn, is that of silence; which, without the appearance of approval, leaves it to the gradual influence of the knowledge now disseminating itself to undermine, and, at length, by regular authority, to remove them.

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Mr. Baker reports on the PARoch IAL schools—

We have just completed the number, which we think at present called for among the Syrians. There is not, strictly speaking, a school to every Parish; but there is not a place where 15 children can be brought together, to which a Schoolmaster has not been appointed.

The following is a List of the Parochial Schools, with their Masters, and the number of Scholars:—

Situation. Masters. Schol. Situation. Masters. Schol. Ancamali......... Verke....... 15 || Curuppampati..... Paulos...... 28 Acaparamba........ Paulo ....... 16 || Ellendur.......... Ittecali ..... 16 Calicheri ......... Immonen .... 18 ll Etatott ........... Govemen .... 21 Callata ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . Kani ............. Cali......... 23 Calluncatare ...... Itte......... 18 || Mamalacheri...... Ittecali...... 17 Callupar.......... Chrishnen ... 25 || Manercatt ........ Shuncaren... 12 Candanatt......... Chrishnen ... 40 || Maramanna ....... Maren ...... 24 Cannacott......... Jacob ....... 19 || Mavelicari......... Govenen .... 36 Carinyacheri...... Isaac ....... 22 || Mulanduratte ... Govenen .... 27 Carticapalli... Narayan.... 40 || Munro Island . Govemen .... 19 Catumpanatt Canan ...... 19 || Nadamel.. Govemen .... 25 Qayanculam . 21 || Nechur..... Ittera... Chinganur. Nedumporum Worke.. Chattanur. Omallur .. Ramen Cheppatt.. Pallicare.. Itte ......... Calancheri. Parenyel .. Atchathen Catamangala Putupalli.. amen Corencheri. Puttanca Narayan ..... 4 Johannen.... 5 Ramen ...... 20 Goveragesa.. 26 -- Teruvilla.. . Ramen ...... 30 Cundere .......... Cashaven .... 50 || Tumbonam ... Goveragesa.. 15 Cunacuruta ....... Ittemani .... 23 || Venida ........... Govenen .... ll Curigni . . ........ Waragesa.... 40 || Wenmani.......... Chandi...... 28

Of these Schools, 27 are situated to the south of Cottayam, or Cotym; and are under the inspection of Govenen Nair: the remainder are to the north, and are superintended by Shuncaren Nair. The Corresponding Committee have been induced, by the increasing prospect of benefit from these Schools, to double the allowance granted for them : the expense is now 400 rupees per quarter. Of the GRAMMAR school, which serves as a nursery to the College, and which contained, at the last dates, 43 pupils, Mr. Baker reports— There is abundant cause for gratitude and praise to God, for the blessing which He continues to bestow on the instructions given. The collec E had '45 Students. Their attendance is punctual, and their application praiseworthy. Their progress, however, has been slower than it would have been if more adequate assistance could have been rendered to the College. From Mr. Fenn's report of the studies of the pupils, the Committee will make some extracts :Marcus is reading Nowell's Catechism and Caesar's Commentaries, both which he translates into English and into his own Language. He also translates from English into Malay

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