Great Expectations and Hard Times

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Macmillan, 1904 - 639 pàgines
 

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Continguts

I
ix
II
1
III
5
IV
12
V
16
VI
24
VII
33
VIII
34
XLIX
318
L
324
LI
332
LII
335
LIII
342
LIV
346
LV
357
LVI
369

IX
43
X
53
XI
59
XII
65
XIII
76
XIV
81
XV
88
XVI
89
XVII
97
XVIII
101
XIX
108
XX
119
XXI
131
XXII
138
XXIII
142
XXIV
153
XXV
160
XXVI
165
XXVII
171
XXVIII
177
XXIX
184
XXX
189
XXXI
200
XXXII
207
XXXIII
212
XXXIV
217
XXXV
223
XXXVI
228
XXXVII
234
XXXVIII
240
XXXIX
246
XL
257
XLI
267
XLII
278
XLIII
283
XLIV
289
XLV
294
XLVI
300
XLVII
306
XLVIII
313
LVII
375
LVIII
379
LIX
390
LX
405
LXI
411
LXII
415
LXIII
421
LXIV
426
LXV
437
LXVI
442
LXVII
447
LXVIII
453
LXIX
458
LXX
464
LXXI
468
LXXII
474
LXXIII
479
LXXV
485
LXXVI
490
LXXVII
501
LXXVIII
507
LXXIX
512
LXXX
518
LXXXI
523
LXXXII
533
LXXXIII
544
LXXXIV
554
LXXXV
561
LXXXVI
564
LXXXVII
571
LXXXVIII
576
LXXXIX
581
XC
589
XCI
596
XCII
603
XCIII
610
XCIV
619
XCV
628
XCVI
633

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Passatges populars

Pàgina 406 - A man of realities. A man of facts and calculations. A man who proceeds upon the principle that two and two are four, and nothing over, and who is not to be talked into allowing for anything over.
Pàgina 406 - The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.
Pàgina 408 - You must paper it,' said the gentleman, rather warmly. 'You must paper it,' said Thomas Gradgrind, 'whether you like it or not. Don't tell us you wouldn't paper it. What do you mean, boy?' 'I'll explain to you, then,' said the gentleman, after another and a dismal pause, 'why you wouldn't paper a room with representations of horses.
Pàgina 405 - ... in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored...
Pàgina 453 - Nature was as strongly bricked out as killing airs and gases were bricked in ; at the heart of the labyrinth of narrow courts upon courts, and close streets upon streets, which had come into existence piecemeal, every piece in a violent hurry for some one man's purpose, and the whole an unnatural family, shouldering, and trampling, and pressing one another to death...
Pàgina 522 - em as if they was figures in a soom, or machines: wi'out loves and likens, wi'out memories and inclinations, wi'out souls to weary and souls to hope — when aw goes quiet, draggin
Pàgina 405 - ... for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, — nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, — all helped the emphasis. " In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir ; nothing but Facts!
Pàgina 40 - And last of all. Pip — and this I want to say very serous to you, old chap — I see so much in my poor mother, of a woman drudging and slaving and breaking her honest hart and never getting no peace in her mortal days, that I'm dead afeerd of going wrong in the way of not doing what's right by a woman, and I'd fur rather of the two go wrong the t'other way, and be a little ill-conwenienced myself.
Pàgina 469 - Let him who is without sin among you cast the first stone at her ! ' There have been plenty to do that. Thou art not the man to cast the last stone, Stephen, when she is brought so low.
Pàgina xv - The essential value and truth of Dickens's writings have been unwisely lost sight of by many thoughtful persons, merely because he presents his truth with some colour of caricature. Unwisely, because Dickens's caricature, though often gross, is never mistaken. Allowing for his manner of telling them, the things he tells us are always true.

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