Guerrillas and Revolution in Latin America: A Comparative Study of Insurgents and Regimes Since 1956

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Princeton University Press, 1992 - 424 pagine

In this comparative survey of guerrilla movements in Latin America, Timothy Wickham-Crowley explores the origins and outcomes of rural insurgencies in nearly a dozen cases since 1956. Focusing on the personal backgrounds of the guerrillas themselves and on national social conditions, the author explains why guerrillas emerged strongly in certain countries but not others. He considers, for example, under what circumstances guerrillas acquire military strength and why they do--or do not--secure substantial support from the peasantry in rural areas.

 

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Indice

Introduction
3
Who Are the Guerrillas?
19
The Social and Political Origins of the Guerrilla Movements
30
Constructing TheoryThe Outcomes of the First Wave 19561970
49
Variables and Models
51
The Role of Military Power
60
The Sources of Peasant Support I Agrarian Structure and Its Transformations
92
The Sources of Peasant Support II Rebellious Cultures and Social Ties
130
The Origins of the Second Wave
209
The Structures of Peasant Support in the Second Wave
231
Regime Weaknesses and Revolution in the Second Wave
263
Winners Losers and AlsoRans Toward an Integration of Revolutionary Theories
302
Profiles of Guerrilla Leadership
327
Social Origins of Guerrilla Leadership Post1970 Period
335
Notes
341
Select Bibliography
407

Regime Weaknesses and the Emergence of Dual Power
154
Guerrillas and Revolution since 1970Testing Theories on the Second Wave
207

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Informazioni sull'autore (1992)

Timothy P. Wickham-Crowley is Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Georgetown University.

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