Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

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Hubert Ashton Holden
1876
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Sommario

Letter
45
Reign of Augustus
47
The lacteal system a proof of a designing Creator W Paley
51
Letter
57
too Philosophy its work
63
Difference between Thucydides and Xenophon
70
Pragmatical meddling with other mens matters R South
73
127
79
A Dacier
81
The force of custom
85
Ridicule the talent of ungenerous teinpers
91
Character of the Barbarians
97
210
101
Virtue requires trial and exercise
103
Rhetorical blandishments
111
Lord Digby revealing himself to Sir John Hotham Lord Clarendon
114
Character
117
200
123
202
124
Expectation
130
Profligacy of politicians in the reign of Charles II Lord Macaulay
136
222
138
Do as you would be done
142
Antiquity of the Jews a great prerogative
148
Fortune mistaken notions concerning
153
175
158
Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots G Buchanan
160
265
165
English taste for the Italian opera
166
275 Operations before the battle of Floddenfield Lord Herbert
172
Talent of ridicule in the possession of an illcondi
176
Nature and situation of the castle of Dumbarton G Buchanan
179
tioned
185
E Burke
191
317
196
The dangers of an honest man in much company A Cowley
197
Letter to H Cromwell
202
336
206
Sickness of Queen Elizabeth
208
346
212
A letter from the Earl of Orford to General Churchili
214
300
221
Painful memory of departed folly
227
Letter to his Mother on the loss of his Aunt
233
A field of battle described 388 Literature in the seventeenth century
238
Immorality of the old Romans
239
King Henry VII after the battle of Stoke Lord Bacon
240
The Earl of Essex before Reading A D 1643 Lord Clarendon 392 The searcher after truth S T Coleridge 393 William of Normandyhis character
241
E Burke 394 Miltonhis blindness H Hallam
242
The Buccaneers W Russell 396 The Poet the monarch of all sciences Sir P Sidney
243
Character 398 Massacre during the French Revolution
244
Battle of Marston Moor fought July A D 1644 H Coleridge
245
W Paley 401 Siege of Badajoz A D 1812
246
Motion for the repeal of the American Stanıp Act E Burke 403 The Villa Pliniana on the Lake of Como
247
P B Shelley 404 Repulse of the Tlascalans by Cortes A D 1519 W H Prescott 405 The successive stages of intellectual progress
248
Death of Nicholas di Rienzi A D 1354
249
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation Spectator
250
Political discontents E Burke 410 Moderation in both circumstances 7 Addison
251
41112 The highest prosperity a forerunner of decay C Thirlwall 413 Charles V in the expedition against Algiers W Robertson 414 Letter 415 Letter t...
254
T Gray 418 The origin of mourning apparel 41718 Character of Julius Cæsar
255
Emulation not to be confined to a narrow sphere
257
The sedatives of anger 421 Canning on the Spanish cause A D 1809
258
R Southey 422 Sir John Moore W F P Napier
259
Lord Raglanhis conduct in the Crimean campaign
260
Enterprising spirit of the Carthaginian government T Arnold 425 Distinct species of oratory
261
Sir W Jones
262
Death Sir W Ralegh
263
Edwin and his pagan priesthood A D 597
264
Sir W Jones 430 Marshal Neyhis betrayal of the Bourbons Sir W Scott 431 The Spaniardsjustification
265
Plato and Seneca on the uses of adversity T Hughes
266
Warren Hastings E Burke 434 Preservation of the purity of a languagea great benefit to society
267
7 Milton
268
Proneness to look into futurity 7 Addison
269
Excellencies of the Greek and Roman historians H Felton 438 Defeat and death of Valens A D 378
270
E Gibbon 439 Empire of reason so called E Burke 440 Charles I his escape from Hampton Court Lord Clarendon
271
What constitutes intemperateness
272
Ruskin 442 Spirit of the English Constitution E Burke 443 The reality of what is truly before
273
Pervading influence of ambition 7 Hughes
274
The English languageits gradual improvement S Johnson 446 The retreat from Moscow
275
Scene in Rasselas
276
S Johnson 448 Description of the Campagna of Rome under even
277
ing light 7 Ruskin 449 The ocean dried up T Burnet 450 The world a heap of ruins T Burnet
278
Story of Malcolm III king of Scotland Lord Lyttelton 452 Of Agriculture A Cowley 453 The praise of a country life
280
H Vaughan 454 Qualification of women for rule H Coleridge
281
Sorrow 456 Character of the Emperor Charles V
282
W Robertson 457 Speech of General Wolfe to his army before Quebec
283
The happiness of obscurity A Cowley
284
The Lilliputians mode of selecting public oficers 7 Swift 460 Pleasure of contemplating divine wisdom
285
T Burnet 461 Monte Nuovo G Sandys
286
462 True wisdom E Stillingfieet 463 Despotic governments
287
Addison 464 Evanescence of ideas 465 Preface to Endymion
288
The peoples delegation of power E Burke 481 Sir Roger de Coverley 7 Addison
298
Milton Lord Macaulay 484 Scipio accused of bribery Sir W Ralegh
299
Humiliation E Burke 486 The Norman Conquest
300
Hume 487 Selfdenial for the sake of posterity 488 The discovery of America
301
Lord Bacon 489 Hoc agere Whichcote 490 Infamy
302
G Herbert 491 Great acts and great eloquence 7 Milton 492 The Emperor Charles V
303
W Robertson 493 Democracy
304
Hume Homer and the Homeric age 495 Alexander Severus
305
E Gibbon 496 Character of King Henry VIII
306
Vindication of truth Sir T Browne 498 Charles VII of France
307
W Robertson 499 Story of Callisthenes and Alexander Lord Bacon 500 The Protector Somerset
308
The speculations of Theorists
309
S T Coleridge 502 Escape of Queen Mary Lord Macaulay 503
310
Crimes and punishments C 7
311
The slaves of Africa and those of the West Indies 505 Lord Clive before the battle of Plassy Lord Macaulay
312
The King and Bishop 507 Alexanders homage to learning P Holland
313
The part of the higher classes in war E Burke
314
A Pope 510 Danger of a quarrelsome spirit 7 Taylor
315
Youth not a reproach W Pitt 512 The goodness of the Deity
316
W Paley 573 A Persian law 514 Of Translation
317
Story of Percennius and Vibulenus
318
Lord Bacon 516 Francis Henry Duke of Luxemburg Lord Macaulay
319
1
320
Spectator Lord Clarendon
324
Milton
325
Reason not as some think an enemy to religion R Hooker
326
Of the true use of history
332
Lord Bacon
338
Of the pursuit of happiness
339
Original rights of man in civil society
345
40
351
The earliest poetry of a nation the best
357
Fortune
358
Navigation and commerce of the Romans
364
A Roman funeral
365
E Burke
370
E Burke
379
Prevalent fashion of censuring public officers
385
Forceuse of it temporary
391
The law of Solon
392
T Arnold
395
Story of Canute
396
The ancient critics their employment
402
Eumenes
408
Life a dream
414
Insensibility to the planetary system
420
177
423
Aristophanes
426
1
434
The perceptions of sense
436
Superiority of intellectual pleasures over all other Lord Bacon
442
Reflection on the tombs in Westminster Abbey 7 Addison
447
G Berkeley
448
Of anger
452
The outpensioners of Chelsea College A D 1739
454
Heaven
460
G Canning
466
Barrow
467
259
469
Hume
475
A melancholy
481
Apprehension in wrongs
487
Of happiness
493
The progress of liberty
499
Lord Bolingbroke
505
Character of Philip of Macedon
507
Of Ambition
513
Swift
515
Theodosius the younger E Gibbon
519
Expectation of perfection
520
357
521
A virtuous old
523
Cheerfulness
524
Cromwell
525
The art of government
526
Norris
527
Ignorance of lifes great business
528
372
529
Truth and error
530
The lower animals without fellowfeeling
531
Letter
532
The Emperor Julian
533
Intercourse with the great men of
534
Fortune
535
Sir R Steele
536
The disease of talking
537
Letter
538
Memory E Gibbon Lord Macaulay B Jonson B Jonson B Jonson B Fonson
539
Max Müller
544
Americaher stake in the British Constitution E Burke

Parole e frasi comuni

Brani popolari

Pagina 40 - Crafty men contemn studies ; simple men admire them ; and wise men use them ; for they teach not their own use ; but that is a wisdom without them and above them, won by observation.
Pagina 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
Pagina 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
Pagina 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Pagina 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
Pagina 423 - In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came upon me, and trembling, which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face ; the hair of my flesh stood up...
Pagina 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Pagina 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Pagina 80 - Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom; little did I dream...
Pagina 174 - Then ensued a scene of woe, the like of which no eye had seen, no heart conceived, and which no tongue can adequately tell. All the horrors of war before known or heard of were mercy to that new havoc. A storm of universal fire blasted every field, consumed every house, destroyed every temple.

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