Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece

Copertina anteriore
Cambridge University Press, 17 ott 2013 - 470 pagine
Divination was an important and distinctive aspect of religion in both ancient China and ancient Greece, and this book will provide the first systematic account and analysis of the two side by side. Who practised divination in these cultures and who consulted it? What kind of questions did they ask, and what methods were used to answer those questions? As well as these practical aspects, Lisa Raphals also examines divination as a subject of rhetorical and political narratives, and its role in the development of systematic philosophical and scientific inquiry. She explores too the important similarities, differences and synergies between Greek and Chinese divinatory systems, providing important comparative evidence to reassess Greek oracular divination.
 

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Indice

Form of the inquiry 13
13
Chinese sources 30
30
Sources compared 47
47
Theorizing divination 61
61
Theories of divination in China 74
74
Greek mantic experts 101
101
Comparative perspectives 118
118
The questions 177
177
Comparisons and conclusions 272
272
Mantic narratives 279
279
Humans gods and mantic hermeneutics 302
302
Mantic narratives compared 313
313
The Chinese mantic arts and systematic cosmology 327
327
Divination and Greek systematic inquiry 353
353
What is comparable? 368
368
Social and institutional comparables 374
374

Private queries 194
194
Questions and risks compared 212
212
State questions from Delphi narrow sample 221
221
Private queries from the broad sample 231
231
Consultors 240
240
Private consultors 251
251
Gender and mantic access 262
262
The intellectual operations 381
381
Glossary 388
388
Appendix B The sexagenary cycle 396
396
Narrow Sample of Delphic responses 399
399
Appendix F Selectionsfrom the Shuihudi daybooks 412
412
Index 461
461
Copyright

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Informazioni sull'autore (2013)

Lisa Raphals is Professor in the Department of Philosophy, National University of Singapore and Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature in the Philosophy Department of the University of California, Riverside. She is the author of Knowing Words: Wisdom and Cunning in the Classical Traditions of China and Greece (1992), Sharing the Light: Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China (1998) and many scholarly articles. Her research interests include comparative philosophy (China and Greece), the history of science, religion, gender and science fiction studies.

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