Human Factors and Interactive Computer Systems: Proceedings of the NYU Symposium on User Interfaces, New York, May 26-28, 1982

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This volume reviews mid-1980s research in the development of computer systems that employ advanced technology to meet the needs of an expanding user population, while remaining sensitive to human requirements. Contributions from researchers in such diverse areas as user interface technology through to controlled experimental evaluations of systems and human factors principles are included in this volume. Topics considered includes recommendations for dialogue design, views of organizations on human factors, graphical and multimedia human/computer interaction, perspectives for the future of interactive systems, and the design of languages for applications in teleconferencing, databases for videotex systems and office automation.
 

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Sommario

CHAPTER 3
47
CHAPTER 4
83
CHAPTER 5
105
CHAPTER 6
118
CHAPTER 7
136
field evaluation
163
CHAPTER 9
191
CHAPTER 10
207
CHAPTER 11
223
CHAPTER 12
243
CHAPTER 13
261
AUTHOR INDEX
277
Copyright

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Pagina 14 - ... line-oriented text editors. A typical comment was, "Once you've used a display editor you will never want to go back to a line editor - you'll be spoiled." Similar comments came from users of stand alone word processors such as the WANG system, or display editors such as EMACS on the MIT/Honeywell MULTICS system or "vi" (for visual editor) on the UNIX system. A beaming advocate called EMACS "the one true editor." Roberts (1979) found that, with line-oriented editors, overall performance times...
Pagina 18 - The operator may see a circuit schematic on the screen and with lightpen touches can move resistors or capacitors into or out of the proposed circuit. When the design is complete, the computer can provide information about current, voltage drops, fabrication costs, or warnings about inconsistencies and manufacturing problems. Similarly, newspaper layout artists or automobile body designers can easily try multiple designs in minutes, and record promising approaches until a better one is found. The...
Pagina 13 - Certain systems generate a glowing enthusiasm among users which is in marked contrast with the more common reaction of grudging acceptance or outright hostility. The enthusiastic users' reports are filled with the positive feelings of: • Mastery of the system. • Competence in performance of their task. • Ease in learning to use the system originally and in acquiring new features.
Pagina 16 - instantly calculating electronic worksheet" in the user's manual, it permits computation and display of results across 254 rows and 63 columns and is programmed without a traditional procedural control structure. For example, positional declarations can prescribe that column 4 displays the sum of columns 1 through 3; then every time a value in the first three columns changes, the fourth column changes as well. Complex dependencies among manufacturing...
Pagina 19 - ... between real-world high temperatures or low pressures and screen representations is so close. Further examples. Driving an automobile is my favorite example of direct manipulation. The scene is directly visible through the windshield, and actions such as braking or steering have become common skills in our culture. To turn to the left, simply rotate the steering wheel to the left. The response is immediate, and the changing scene provides feedback to refine the turn. Imagine trying to turn by...
Pagina 19 - My favorite example of direct manipulation is driving an automobile. The scene is directly visible through the front window, and actions such as braking or steering have become common knowledge in our culture. To turn to the left, simply rotate the steering wheel to the left. The response is immediate and the scene changes, providing feedback to refine the turn. Imagine trying to turn by issuing a command "LEFT 30 DEGREES...
Pagina 18 - Honeywell's process control system provides an oil refinery, paper mill, or power utility plant manager with a colored schematic view of the plant. The schematic may be on eight displays, with red lines indicating a sensor value that is out of normal range. By pressing a single numbered button (there are no commands to learn or remember), the operator can get a more detailed view of the troublesome component and, with a second press, move the tree structure down to examine individual sensors or to...

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