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THE

WORKS

OF

JOHN OWEN, D. D.,

EDITED

BY THE REV. WILLIAM H. GOOLD,

EDINBURGH.

VOL. V.

ON JUSTIFICATION.

GRACE BE WITH ALL THEM WHO LOVE TIB LORD JBSU8

CHRIST IN SINCERITY."'-Eph. vi. 24:

OFFICE FOR THE SALE OF
THE LEIGHTON PUBLICATIONS,

AT THE DEPOSITORY OF
THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL BOOK SOCIETY,

IN
PHILADELPHIA.
1 2 2 4 CHESTNUT STREET.

M.DCCC.LXII.

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“ Honoramus eos charitate, non servitute : nec eis templa construimus. Nolunt enim se sic à nobis honorari : quia nosipsos cùm boni sumus, templa summi Dei esse poverunt.”

AUGUSTINUS, DE VER. RELIG. CAP. LIV.

Πώς γαρ ουκ άτοπον, υπέρ μέν χρημάτων μη ετέροις πιστεύειν, αλλ' αριθμώ και ψήφω τούτο επιτρέπειν υπέρ δέ πραγμάτων ψηφιζομένους απλώς τους ετέρων παρασύρεσθαι δόξαις και ταύτα, ακριβή ζυγόν απάντων έχοντας και γνώμονα και κανόνα, των Θείων νόμων την απόφασιν;

CHRYSOSTOMI HOMIL. XII. 2 COR.

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PRE FACE
TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

It was remarked by one who did not receive the theological views of Owen, that he was a man “who had sounded the depths of practical religion.” Another, who accepted the theology of the great non-conformist, called him “the mountain" from which the writers of subsequent ages have digged. These two remarks combined express the views of the present writer. There are perhaps no theological writings in the English language so rich, full and comprehensive as those of Owen, while yet the principles of religion are never stated as mere theoretic truths, but are so conceived and expressed as to carry in them, and put forth upon the mind that reads them the greatest possible practical force.

To the student who takes up the works of this great Author, they are likely at first to prove unattractive. The style is prolix and without the least attempt at ornament. The ideas are not distinct, sharply defined, each occupying a narrow compass of expression and hence falling in rapid succession like coins from the mint, but spread themselves over a wide surface of remark, with innumerable elements springing from the wonderfully prolific mind of the writer, augmenting as they flow and perhaps not reaching a complete development until the whole subject is exhausted and the treatise closed.

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