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nitatem, cognationem, praeterea foedus intervenisse; ad hoc metuere, ne fluxa fide usus popularium animos averteret, quís et Jugurtha carus et Romani invisi erant. Denique saepius fatigatus lenitur et ex voluntate Sullae omnia se facturum promittit. Ceterum ad simulandam pacem, cujus Numida defessus bello avidissimus, quae utilia visa, constituunt. Ita composito dolo digrediuntur.

112. At rex postero die Asparem Jugurthae legatum appellat dicitque sibi per Dabarem ex Sulla cognitum, posse condicionibus bellum poni;' quamobrem regis sui sententiam exquireret. Ille laetus in castra Jugurthae venit; dein ab illo cuncta edoctus, properato itinere post diem octavum redit ad Bocchum et ei denuntiat, 'Jugurtham cupere omnia, quae imperarentur, facere, sed Mario parum confidere; saepe antea cum imperatoribus Romanis pacem conventam? frustra fuisse. Ceterum Bocchus si ambobus consultum et ratam pacem vellet, daret operam, ut una ab omnibus quasi de pace in colloquium veniretur, ibique sibi Sullam traderet; quum talem virum in potestatem habuisset,3 tum fore, uti jussu senatus populique Romani foedus fieret, neque hominem nobilem non sua ignavia sed ob rem publicam“ in hostium potestate relictum iri.'

113. Haec Maurus secum ipse diu volvens tandem promisit, ceterum dolo an vere cunctatus, parum comperimus. Sed plerumque regiae voluntates, ut vehementes, sic mobiles, saepe ipsae sibi adversae. Postea tempore et loco constituto, in colloquium uti de pace veniretur, Bocchus Sullam modo, modo Jugurthae legatum appellare, benigne habere, idem ambobus polliceri. Illi pariter laeti ac spei bonae pleni esse. Sed nocte ea, quae proxima fuit ante diem colloquio decretum, *Maurus adhibitis amicis ac statim, immutata voluntate, reBocchus being married to Jugurtha. Respecting their cognatio (relation by blood) nothing is known, but there must have been a family connexion between the neighbouring kings. Intervenissethat is, factum esse—referring especially to foedus.

1. That the war could be brought to a close by mutual conces. sions.'

2 Pax conventa, 'the peace which is agreed upon.' Observe the rare use of the passive participle ; for convenire is commonly intransitive-as pax convenit, a 'peace is concluded.'

3 In potestatem habere is ungrammatical for in potestate habere, but is found now and then. See Zumpt, 0 316.

* The expression is somewhat contorted; for the inserted clause non sua ignavia sed ob rem publicam should have a verb of its own, which, however, would be a part of the leading verb-namely, qu in hostium potestate esset.

5. In contradiction with themselves,' 'contradictory.'

motis ceteris,' dicitur secum ipse multa agitavisse, vultu? corporis pariter atque animo varius, quae scilicet tacente ipso occulta pectoris patefecisse. Tamén postremo Sullam accersi jubet et ex ejus sententia Numidae insidias tendit. Deinde, ubi dies advenit et ei nuntiatum est Jugurtham haud procul abesse, cum paucis amicis et quaestore nostro quasi obvius honoris causa procedit in tumulum facillimum visu insidiantibus. Eodem Numida cum plerisque necessariis suis inermis, uti dictum erat, accedit ac statim, signo dato, undique simul ex insidiis invaditur. Ceteri obtruncati; Jugurtha Sullae vinctus traditur, et ab eo ad Marium deductus est.4

114. Per idem tempusó adversum Gallos ab ducibus nostris

years.

1. The king first summoned his councillors, then dismissed them immediately, and for a long time meditated by himself. Ceteris refers to the preceding amicis, but is used instead of iis, to form antithesis to himself: . after the removal of all the rest, he deliberated by himself.'

Vultus, chiefly 'the look of the eyes,' but also the features of he countenance,' by which the inward emotions are manifested; hence Sallust here, by the addition of corporis, opposes the outward expression to the emotions of the mind : He changed (varied) in the expression of his bodily features as much as in his sentiments.' Quae scilicet patefecisse, which, as could be seen, revealed his mental emotions.' Quae is the neuter plural, and scilicet contains the leading verb.

3 That is, ut praeceptum erat, and not dictum in the sense of edictum; for according to the deceitful agreement, the condiciones pacis were to be determined peaceably.

*Sallust passes very rapidly over the catastrophe of a king who had worn out, by simulation and war, the Roman armies for six

He was taken prisoner in B. c. 106, when Marius was no longer consul, but yet remained in Africa as proconsul. Sulla considered the capture of Jugurtha to be an event so important, and to himself so glorious, that he had engraved on his sealing ring.

s! During the same time;' that is, ihe time during which Marius, as proconsul, was still in Africa, occupied no doubt with the regulation of the affairs which, owing to the long war, had fallen into disorder. Bocchus received a part of western Numidia, as far as the river Ampsaga; and Numidia was divided between Hiempsal and Hiarbas, two princes of the family of Masinissa. These and other matters detained Marius in Africa during the year B. c. 105, in which the Romans under the consul Gn. Manlius and the proconsul Q. Caepio, suffered a great defeat from the Cimbri, on the river Rhodanus. This led to the second consulship of Marius, in B. c. 104. The people whom Sallust here calls Gauls (Galli) are the Cimbri and Teutones, German tribes coming from the countries about the Elbe. This mistake must be accounted for by the general difficulty of distinguishing Celtic (Gallic) from Germanic tribes, and also by the circumstance that the Cimbri had for many years been wandering about in Gaul.

Q. Caepione et Gn. Manlio male pugnatum; quo metu Italia omnis contremuerat. Illiquel et inde usque ad nostram memoriam Romani sic habuere, alia omnia virtuti suae prona esse: cum Gallis pro salute, non pro gloria, certare. Sed postquam bellum in Numidia confectum et Jugurtham Romam vinctum adduci nuntiatum est, Marius consul absens factus et ei decreta provincia Gallia; isque Kalendis Januariis magna gloria consul triumphavit. Ea tempestate spes atque opes civitatis in illo sitae.

· Illique; that is, the Romans then living, as opposed to those in the time of Sallust. Sic hubuere, 'entertained this opinion.'

? Certare ; supply se; unless we read certari, to which it is easier to supply a se.

3 On the 1st of January B. c. 104. We may here observe, that Jugurtha, after he had adorned the triumphal procession at Rome, was put to death in the public prison near the Forum-which is described by Sallust, Cat. 55—at the same hour in which Marius offered up his thanksgiving to Jupiter Optimus Maximus in the Ca. pitol.

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