A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Grape Vine on Open Walls

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Mason and Son, Chichester, 1835 - 164 pagine
 

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Pagina 11 - And Judah and Israel dwelt safely, every man under his vine and under his figtree, from Dan even to Beer-sheba, all the days of Solomon.
Pagina 18 - Introduction ; Observations on the present Method of Cultivating Grape Vines on open Walls ; on the capability and extent of the Fruit-bearing Powers of the Vine; on Aspect; on Soil ; on Manure ; on the Construction of Walls ; on the Propagation of Vines ; on the Pruning of Vines ; on the Training of Vines ; on the Management of a Vine during the first five years of its growth; Weekly Calendarial...
Pagina 19 - Nor let it be supposed that this estimate is madehypothetically ; on the contrary, it is the result of actual inspection and careful observation, and is considerably within the mark as to the quantity of grapes that might be annually grown. Every moderate-sized dwelling-house, having a garden and a little walling attached to it, may with ease be made to produce yearly a quarter of a ton weight of grapes, leaving a sufficient portion of its surface for the production of other fruit...
Pagina 86 - ... and the branches, the buds begin to elongate and unfold. From this time the fluid becoming more expanded every hour, its ascent is simultaneously increased in force and velocity. The vessels in the branches being filled to repletion, the buds quickly open, and shoots and leaves rapidly protrude. " The leaves attract the sap as soon as it reaches their vicinity, and, by one of the most wonderful processes that can be conceived, the result of exquisite organization, elaborate and prepare it, and...
Pagina 47 - One of the principal causes of grapes not ripening well on open walls in this country, is the great depth of mould in which the roots of vines are suffered to run, which, enticing them to penetrate in search of food below the influence of the sun's rays, supplies them with too great a quantity of moisture ; vegetation is thereby carried on till late in the summer, in consequence of which the ripening process does not commence till the declination of the sun becomes too rapid to afford a sufficiency...
Pagina 30 - July many of the bunches measured eleven inches from the shoulders to the extremities, and when matured, would have weighed a pound and a half each. They hung close together, forming as far as they extended on the wall, an entire and compact mass of grapes, the weight of which, if ripened, would have exceeded sixty pounds. The middle of that month arrived, and the berries had only reached the size of small peas, while those on other vines, not subjected to any such trial, were full grown, and had...
Pagina 96 - Prune so as to leave as few wounds as possible, and let the surface of every cut be perfectly smooth.
Pagina 58 - Bones, however, on account of their prolonged effect, are by far the most valuable manure that can be deposited in a vine border. They should be buried in the soil whole, and as fresh as possible. Every variety of size may be procured, from the smallest bone of a fowl, to the largest bone of an ox. The small bones will decompose in a few months, but the largest will remain for twenty, thirty, and even fifty years, before they are entirely decayed, while the intermediate-sized ones, according to their...
Pagina 73 - Hoare regulates by the height of the wall and its aspect. " If the height be less than four feet, and the aspect south, the coping ought not to project at all, as the light and solar heat excluded by it will be a serious drawback on the healthy vegetation of the vines. But if the wall be four feet high, then the coping may project as many inches ; and if this width be increased an inch for every foot that the wall increases in height up to twelve feet, the principal advantages arising from the protection...
Pagina 68 - There is a disadvantage, however, in training grapes near the ground, as it respects their remaining on the vine after being ripe. If grapes can be kept perfectly dry, they will hang on the vine and improve in flavour for a long time after they are ripe; but if dampness or moisture of any description reach them, the consequences are quickly seen in the decay of the berries. After the middle of October, therefore, it will be found a difficult matter to preserve grapes that hang within two feet of...

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