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NATURE OF THE SUMMER COURSES

No part of the work of the School of Expression has shown greater growth or efficiency than the work done in the Summer Terms.

For forty years, leading teachers in the colleges, normal and high schools have attended. The work has gradually been unfolded, and will be greatly increased this summer to aid the public school teachers, in the personal use of their voices and also with right methods of teaching, reading, conversation, and various kinds of speaking.

Everything has been done to give serious students the most thorough work possible. The inspiration received from these terms as well as information regarding principles and personal training of the voice have been invaluable. :

Many of the very ablest teachers have made a great success of their work on account of the assistance received at these summer terms.

The number of these terms being limited, all are earnestly requested to apply as soon as possible, stating full particulars as to the class of work that is desired, as to individual needs, personal aims, positions held, in short, full information.

GROWTH AND ORGANIZATION OF THE SUMMER WORK

The first Summer Term of the School of Expression was held in 1886 — before the custom of holding summer sessions had become as general as it now is among educational institutions. The seed sown in this first term has grown into a mighty tree, the branches of which extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific Coast. Students come from every state in the Union and from every Province of Canada. There have been in attendance teachers and graduates from nearly all leading universities and colleges, and representatives of almost every calling in life. While it is a school for professional men and women, it offers at the same time training and culture to all.

All of these various terms are organized in vital relation with the School. Each manifests the same purpose and uses the same methods, but applies the principles to accomplish results from the point of view of the subject assigned to each individual term. The tried methods of the School of Expression make its Summer Terms the greatest organized educational movement of the kind in the world.

Organization and concentration in selected subjects, and attention to individual needs, enables the School to accomplish results in training hitherto not supposed attainable except in long terms. Summer students, as far as possible, are offered methods of training, application of principles to needs, and scientific and artistic treatment of expression.

Every regular Summer Term includes courses in the training of the voice, development of the body, vocal interpretation of the best literature, conversation, speaking, and other exercises, which lead students to think for themselves and to express thought and experience in their own way. Students are divided into sections according to their needs and advancement.

WHAT THE SCHOOL DOES The School of Expression has for years been ahead of public thought; it is a school organized to meet present age needs. A report of the National Council of Teachers of English states:

“We have been trying to teach literature through the eye. We can't do it. The public speaking and Expression teachers are on the right track. You can't appreciate good literature without this training in Expression.” Every student is led to develop the best that is in him. “From within out,” “naturalness," “individuality," “ spontaneity," “ creative thinking ” — these are a few of the slogans of the School.

APPRECIATIONS OF THE SCHOOL OF EXPRESSION

A well known Educator once wrote of our work:

“If all our secondary school English teachers were trained in the methods of the School of Expression, if instead of asking a student to tell what he thinks of the reading assignment (and getting merely what he thinks he ought to think) they tested his appreciation and understanding by teaching him to read the assignment aloud with his own interpretation, there would come to our universities an entirely new type of students, young men and women who know how to read and are ready for the advanced study of literature. Just this work is given in the School of Expression. May all high school instructors who are training students for university work in literature be inspired to attend this school and absorb its method.”

A student of the Dramatic Term of 1921 wrote us:

“From boyhood I have often heard my father speak in high terms of what your school did for him. After these six weeks of the Dramatic Term I can appreciate his feeling. As a minister I questioned somewhat the value of such a course for my personal needs, but every day has meant a great deal in enabling me to see my weaknesses, the cause of them, and the way to overcome them.

“I desire especially to commend the positive, constructive character of the teaching and criticism and the great amount of personal attention which I received.”

President C. A. Mock, of Western Union College, Lemars, Ia., in a recent letter to one of our graduates, says:

“I think his (Dr. Curry) system is the only really sensible and efficient one before us today. I studied for two years while at Yale under a man who was a graduate of the Boston School. He was a master and what I have learned in the art of Expression is largely due to the work I had there."

One graduate, a teacher of pantomime in New York says:

* At no other institution in the world is it possible to secure the training one secures at the School of Expression. It is far broader than a mere

BOSTON DRAMATIC TERM

May 12 to June 20, 1924
Personal Direction of Mr. Belford Forrest

FACULTY
John Kennedy Lacock, A.B. (Washington and Jefferson College '01), A.M.

(Harvard '06), President
Belford Forrest, B.A., Director
Eliza Josephine Harwood, A.B. (T. D. 00)
C. Sheldon Holcomb, B.S. (Phil. D. ’14)
Prof. Robert E. Rogers, A.M.
Judith Plummer Huntington (T. D. '93)
Nixon Waterman

COURSES IN INSTRUCTION 1. Contemporary Drama. — This course deals with the historic past of the drama as a literary form and aids the student to read and see plays intelligently. It also draws attention to tragedy, comedy, problem-play, fantasy and the like.

2. Stage Art. — A practical class in make-up, stage rehearsal, costuming, stage business and all things necessary for a successful public presentation.

3. Play Production. — The technique of acting is studied in rehearsals and practical problems are worked out. Special attention to the modern presentation of plays.

4. Dramatic Rehearsal. — Modern drama, one-act plays. A progression from the one-act play, and scenes from the play, to the study of a three-act play.

5. Dramatic Reading. — This course offers vocal expression for dramatic values.

6. Dramatic Modulations of Voice (vocal expression). — This is a study of tone based on imagination and dramatic thinking.

7. Vocal Training. — Practical exercises are given for the development of voice, physiologically and psychologically.

8. Harmonic Training. — Develops the physical organism and the body for flexibility and expression.

9. Rhythmical Balance Movements. Progressive technical training in formal rhythmical movements and dancing for development of poise, grace and freedom based upon the laws of harmonic training.

10. Corrective Speech. — Training of the ear and the speech organism for correct enunciation. Elimination of mechanical and imitative effects in voice and speech.

BOSTON JULY TERM

June 23 to August 1, 1924
Personal Direction of Miss Mary Hollingsworth

FACULTY
John Kennedy Lacock, A.B. (Washington and Jefferson College '01), A.M.

(Harvard ’06) President
Mary Hollingsworth, A.B. (T. D. '14)
C. Sheldon Holcomb, B.S. (Phil. D. '14)
Judith Plummer Huntington (T. D. '93)
Gladys Ray (G. C. '24)
Nixon Waterman

COURSES IN INSTRUCTION 1. Foundations of Expression. — Studies of the actions and conditions of the mind and of their natural signs, — the relation of the vocal expression to vocal and pantomimic training. Textbook; Dr. Curry, “ Foundations of Expression."

2. Vocal Expression. — Studies in imagination and dramatic instinct in reading, and of the modulations of the voice and their relations to speech. Textbook: Dr. Curry, “ Lessons in Vocal Expression." .

3. Vocal Training. — Voice training is pursued for right tone production, and for the improvement of speech. Practice exercises for development of voice, physiologically and psychologically.

4. Public Reading. —- Emphasis is laid upon the material as well as its interpretation. Training of a student's relation, not only to his reading, but also to his audience. Interpretations of forms of literature, narrative dramatic and lyric. Arrangement and organization of programs.

5. Public Speaking. — Speaking for facility and ease is practised in all classes in reading and vocal expression. This course aims to awaken in the student a desire to give expression to his thoughts and to train him to arrange and deliver his thoughts.

6. Story Telling. Development of imagination in vocal expression through the study of folk tales, legendary, historical and modern stories, modern fairy tales, wonder tales, nature tales, stories of real life.

7. Dramatic Reading. This course offers opportunities for dramatic values in platform interpretation.

8. Dramatic Rehearsal. A practical course in the production of modern one-act plays.

9. Rhythmical Balance Movements. — Progressive technical training in formal rhythmical movements and dancing for development of poise,

BOSTON AUGUST TERM

August 4 to August 29, 1924
Personal Direction of Miss Mary Hollingsworth

FACULTY
John Kennedy Lacock, A.B. (Washington and Jefferson College '01), A.M.

(Harvard ’06), President
Mary Hollingsworth, A.B. (T. D. ’14)
Edward Abner Thompson, A.M. (Art. D. '14)
Eliza Josephine Harwood, A.B. (T. D. '00)
Judith Plummer Huntington (T. D. ’93)

COURSES IN INSTRUCTION 1. Vocal Expression. — Studies in imagination and dramatic instinct in reading, and of the modulations of the voice and their relations to speech. Textbook: Dr. Curry, “ Lessons in Vocal Expression.”

2. Vocal Training. A study of thinking and feeling, as determining voice conditions, and systematic exercises for the thorough control of the voice and improvement of articulation.

3. Public Reading. — Emphasis is laid upon the material as well as its interpretation. Training of a student's relation, not only to his reading, but also to his audience. Interpretations of forms of literature, narrative dramatic and lyric. Arrangement and organization of programs.

4. Public Speaking. — Speaking for facility and ease is practiced in all classes in reading and vocal expression. This course aims to awaken in the student a desire to give expression to his thoughts and to train him to arrange and deliver his thoughts.

5. Platform Art. — Principles of interpretation applied to various forms of literature; dramatic modulations of voice and body; appreciations and criticisms; weekly public recitals.

6. Dramatic Rehearsal. — Modern drama, one-act plays. A progression from the one-act play, and scenes from the play, to the study of a three-act play.

7. Methods of Teaching. Arrangement of programs in fundamental subjects for teaching. Practice in presenting the subject to classes.

8. Harmonic Training. -- Develops the physical organism and the body for flexibility and expression; co-ordination of voice and body.

9. Rhythmical Balance Movements. — Progressive technical training in formal rhythmical movements and dancing for development of poise, grace and freedom based upon the laws of harmonic training.

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