The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Volume 1

Copertina anteriore
B. Motte, 1729
12 Recensioni
Isaac Newton's The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy translated by Andrew Motte and published in two volumes in 1729 remains the first and only translation of Newton's Philosophia naturalis principia mathematica, which was first published in London in 1687. As the most famous work in the history of the physical sciences there is little need to summarize the contents.--J. Norman, 2006.
 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Valutazioni degli utenti

5 stelle
9
4 stelle
1
3 stelle
1
2 stelle
1
1 stella
0

LibraryThing Review

Recensione dell'utente  - donbuch1 - LibraryThing

This classic series represents the Western canon not without academic controversy. The latest volumes of the Great Books include some women writers, but they are still definitely underrepresented ... Leggi recensione completa

LibraryThing Review

Recensione dell'utente  - rylltraka - LibraryThing

The texts themselves are priceless, but the translations in this volume are seriously dated and often obscure the meaning of the Greek - especially worthy of disdain are the Aristophanes translations ... Leggi recensione completa

Indice

I
II
41
III
57
IV
79
V
94
VI
104
VII
143
VIII
154
IX
168
X
178
XI
196
XII
218
XIII
263
XIV
292
XV
311

Altre edizioni - Visualizza tutto

Parole e frasi comuni

Brani popolari

Pagina 9 - Absolute, true, and mathematical time, of itself, and from its own nature, flows equably without relation to anything external, and by another name is called duration: relative, apparent, and common time, is some sensible and external (whether accurate or unequable) measure of duration by the means of motion, which is commonly used instead of true time; such as an hour, a day, a month, a year.
Pagina 66 - From the same demonstration it likewise follows that the arc which a body, uniformly revolving in a circle by means of a given centripetal force, describes in any time is a mean proportional between the diameter of the circle and the space which the same body falling by the same given force would descend through in the same given time.
Pagina 36 - ... of a hammer) is (as far as I can perceive) certain and determined, and makes the bodies to return one from the other with a relative velocity, which is in a given ratio to that relative velocity with which they met.
Pagina 19 - The change of motion is proportional to the motive force impressed; and is made in the direction of the right line in which that force is impressed.
Pagina 41 - QUANTITIES, AND THE RATIOS OF QUANTITIES, WHICH IN ANY FINITE TIME CONVERGE CONTINUALLY TO EQUALITY, AND BEFORE THE END OF THAT TIME APPROACH NEARER THE ONE TO THE OTHER THAN BY ANY GIVEN DIFFERENCE, BECOME ULTIMATELY EQUAL.
Pagina 20 - If a body impinge upon another, and by its force change the motion of the other, that body also (because of the equality of the mutual pressure) will undergo an equal change, in its own motion, towards the contrary part.
Pagina 15 - The effects which distinguish absolute from relative motion are the forces of receding from the axis of circular motion. For there are no such forces in a circular motion purely relative, but in a true and absolute circular motion they are greater or less, according to the quantity of the motion.
Pagina 3 - This force consists in the action only, and remains no longer in the body when the action is over. For a body maintains every new state it acquires, by its inertia only. But impressed forces are of different origins, as from percussion, from pressure, from centripetal force.

Informazioni bibliografiche